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Blue-tipped Damselfly, femal
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Shot in UV light. Scorplings at this instar do not fluorescence under UV yet.

Quote www.sciencedirect.com/science/…
Scorpions are largely solitary, nocturnal arachnids that glow a bright cyan-green under UV light. The function of this fluorescence is a mystery. Previous studies of four species from three families have shown that scorpion lateral and medial eyes are maximally sensitive to green light (around 500 nm) and secondarily to UV (350–400 nm). Scorpions are negatively phototactic, and we used this behaviour to assay the responses of desert grassland scorpions, Paruroctonus utahensis, to 395 nm UV light, 505 nm cyan-green light, 565 nm green light and no light within small, circular arenas. Based on the eye sensitivity data, we predicted maximal response to 505 nm, followed by lower responses to 395 and 565 nm. In our experiments, however, scorpions responded most intensely (abrupt bouts of locomotory activity) to 395 nm and 505 nm. Next, we ran trials under 395 and 505 nm on scorpions with their eyes blocked. Scorpions with blocked eyes were much less likely to move under 505 nm than under 395 nm and were much less likely to move under 505 nm than were control animals (those without their eyes blocked). These results suggest an active role for fluorescence in scorpion light detection. Other studies indicate that photosensitive elements in scorpion tails are sensitive to green light. We therefore propose that the cuticle may function as a whole-body photon collector, transducing UV light to cyan-green before relaying this information to the central nervous system. Scorpions may use this information to detect shelter, as blocking any part of the cuticle could diminish the signal.
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Notonectidae is a cosmopolitan family of aquatic insects in the order Hemiptera, commonly called backswimmers because they swim upside down. They are all predators, up to nearly 2 cm in size. They are similar in appearance to Corixidae (Water boatmen), but can be separated by differences in their dorsal-ventral coloration, front legs, and predatory behavior. Their dorsum is convex, lightly colored without cross striations. Their front tarsi are not scoop-shaped and their hind legs are fringed for swimming. There are two subfamilies, Notonectinae and Anisopinae, each containing four genera.

The most common genus of backswimmers is Notonecta - streamlined, deep-bodied bugs up to 16 mm long, green, brown or yellowish in colour. As the common name indicates, these aquatic insects swim on their backs, vigorously paddling with their long, hair-fringed hind legs.

Backswimmers are predators and attack prey as large as tadpoles and small fish, and can inflict a painful "bite" on a human being (actually, similar to a mosquito "bite", it is a stab with their tubular mouthpart). They inhabit still freshwater, e.g. lakes, pools, marshes, and are sometimes found in garden ponds. Although primarily aquatic, they can fly well and so can disperse easily to new habitats.

In contrast to other aquatic insects that cling to submerged objects, Anisops deanei uses a unique system to stay submerged: using the extra oxygen supply from haemoglobin in their abdomen, instead of using oxygen dissolved in the water. The size of these air bubbles, which provide buoyancy, changes as the nitrogen dissolves into the blood and the oxygen is used in respiration. This allows for regulation of the size of the air bubbles and their concentration of oxygen.

Source [link]
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Manage to lure one out of her nest for a quick shoot! Taken in Fraser's Hill, Malaysia

Tarantulas (as the term is used in North America) comprise a group of often hairy and very large arachnids belonging to the family Theraphosidae, of which approximately 900 species have been identified. Although some members of the same suborder may also be called "tarantulas" in the common parlance, this article only describes members of Theraphosidae.

Some genera of tarantulas hunt prey primarily in trees; others hunt on or near the ground. All tarantulas can produce silk—while arboreal species will typically reside in a silken "tube tent", terrestrial species will line their burrows with silk to stabilize the burrow wall and facilitate climbing up and down. Tarantulas mainly eat insects and other arthropods, using ambush as their primary method of prey capture. The biggest tarantulas can kill animals as large as lizards, mice, birds and small snakes. They can be found in the south and western parts of the United States, Central America, and throughout South America. Tarantulas can also be found throughout Africa, large parts of Asia and all over Australia. In Europe, there are some species in Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy, and in Cyprus. Most tarantulas are harmless to humans, and some species are popular in the exotic pet trade. All tarantulas are venomous, but only some species have venom that, while not known to have ever produced human fatalities, can produce extreme discomfort over a period of several days.

Like all arthropods, the tarantula is an invertebrate that relies on an exoskeleton for muscular support. A tarantula’s body consists of two main parts, the prosoma (cephalothorax) and the opisthosoma (abdomen). The prosoma and opisthosoma are connected by the pedicle, or what is often called the pregenital somite. This waist-like connecting piece is actually part of the prosoma and allows the opisthosoma to move in a wide range of motion relative to the prosoma.

The sizes range from as small as a fingernail to as big as a dinner plate. Depending on the species, the body length of tarantulas ranges from 2.5 to 10 centimetres (1 to 4 in), with 8–30-centimetre (3–12 in) leg spans. Leg span is determined by measuring from the tip of the back leg to the tip of the front leg on the opposite side. The largest species of tarantula can weigh over 85 grams (3 oz). The largest of all, the goliath birdeater (Theraphosa blondi) from Venezuela and Brazil, has been reported to have a weight of 150 grams (5.3 oz) and a leg-span of up to 30 centimetres (12 in), males being the longer and females greater in girth.

T. apophysis (the pinkfoot goliath) was described 187 years after the goliath birdeater; therefore its characteristics are not as well attested.T. blondi is generally thought to be the heaviest tarantula, and T. apophysis to have the greatest leg span. Two other species, Lasiodora parahybana (the Brazilian salmon birdeater) and L. klugi, rival the size of the two goliath spiders.

The majority of North American tarantulas are brown. Elsewhere have been found species colored cobalt blue (Haplopelma lividum), black with white stripes (Aphonopelma seemanni), yellow leg markings (Eupalaestrus campestratus), metallic blue legs with vibrant orange abdomen and greenbottle blue (Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens). Their natural habitats include savanna, grasslands such as the pampas, rainforests, deserts, scrubland, mountains, and cloud forests. They are generally classed among the terrestrial types. They are burrowers that live in the ground.

Tarantulas are becoming increasingly popular as pets and are readily available in captivity.

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Male Amur Tiger | Mirko

Shot through glass

★ Location: ZOO Sauvage de Saint-Félicien [link]

Lens: Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM


___________________________________________________



★ Copyright © Eltasia. All rights reserved
You may NOT use, replicate, manipulate, or modify this image.
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Male Amur Tiger | Sashka, he has around 9 or 10 months

★ Location: ZOO Sauvage de Saint-Félicien [link]

Camera: Canon EOS 50D
Lens: Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6

___________________________________________________




★ Copyright © Eltasia. All rights reserved
You may NOT use, replicate, manipulate, or modify this image.
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Female Amur Tiger | Amurshaya

★ Location: ZOO Sauvage de Saint-Félicien [link]

Lens: Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM | Canon EF 1.4 II Extender



___________________________________________________



★ Copyright © Eltasia. All rights reserved
You may NOT use, replicate, manipulate, or modify this image.
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Taken in Lincoln City, Oregon
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Taken in Leadville, Colorado
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Taken in Seattle, Washington
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:bulletpurple:89/365
:bulletyellow:For more "365 days" photos click here ---> [link] <---
:bulletorange:Facebook Fan Page ---> [link] <---
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Model Vova video [link]
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Model Sergei
New Video [link]


If you want photos in hi res or for ads, you can buy them from this stock shutterstock [link]
Fotolia [link]
Dreamstime [link]
Depositphotos [link]
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My facebook: [link]
Photo by Duy Truong: [link]
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art account: :iconstarbuxx:
facebook: [link]

paint and model = me :)
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Not really from a proper shoot, but I got this little shot snapped at Pinned Miami while I was walking around the con!
Pinned Miami is South Florida's pin up, retro, and rockabilly convention! Find out more here: pinupfestival.com/

Photo by Pedro Heshike :D
Hair and makeup by the lovely Sandy Tang www.facebook.com/sandmuffinmak…
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(c) Myself.
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'cuz I know you love me, baby.

Concept, photography and styling by the fabulous, the amazing, the currently tipsy, MAD DAME. :iconmad-dame:
Modeling by :iconsabbathphotography:
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[link]

Makeup by Claire Steer and Tegan Thomson.
Modeling by Quinn Gatsby Teagle :iconquinnofhearts: and Sabbath. :iconsabbathliterature:
Photography by :iconchurch-of-pye:
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Large Glomeridae millipede from Borneo.

D700, extension tubes, Nikkor Micro 60/2.8D, SB-900 and SB-800
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Original mantis from Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Borneo.

D700, Nikkor Micro 60/2.8D, extension tubes, SB-800 & SB-900
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Swarm of bats. Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Borneo.

D300s, TCx2, Nikkor 70-300 VR
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© 2010 Akif Hakan Celebi
California , USA
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Neri O
Istanbul 2009
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Akif Hakan for Pierre Garroudi
Photography: Akif Hakan Celebi
Hair Stylist: Takanori Yamaguchi
Make- Up Artist : Stephanie Stokkvik
Stylist Assistant: Sarah Thomas
Photographer's Assistant: Alison Cartwright
Model: Andrea Chovanova
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