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Male Amur Tiger | Sashka, he has around 9 or 10 months

★ Location: ZOO Sauvage de Saint-Félicien [link]

Camera: Canon EOS 50D
Lens: Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6

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★ Copyright © Eltasia. All rights reserved
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Lens: Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM


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★ Copyright © Eltasia. All rights reserved
You may NOT use, replicate, manipulate, or modify this image.
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Amur Tigers


★ Location: ZOO Sauvage de Saint-Félicien [link]


Lens: Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM


___________________________________________________



★ Copyright © Eltasia. All rights reserved
You may NOT use, replicate, manipulate, or modify this image.
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in the yard of course.
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With some mites....
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fullview
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Dolomedes is a genus of large spiders of the family Pisauridae. They are also known as fishing spiders, raft spiders, dock spiders or wharf spiders. Almost all Dolomedes species are semi-aquatic, with the exception of the tree-dwelling D. albineus of the southwestern United States. Many species have a striking pale stripe down each side of the body.

They hunt by waiting at the edge of a pool or stream, then when they detect the ripples from prey, they run across the surface to subdue it using their foremost legs, which are tipped with small claws; like other spiders they then inject venom with their hollow jaws to kill and digest the prey. They mainly eat insects, but some larger species are able to catch small fish. They can also climb beneath the water, when they become encased in a silvery film of air.

There are over a hundred species of Dolomedes throughout the world; examples include Dolomedes aquaticus, a forest-stream species of New Zealand, the raft spider (D. fimbriatus), which lives in bogs in Europe, and the great raft spider (D. plantarius), which lives in fens, also in Europe. Many species are large, some with females up to 26 mm (1.0 in) long with a leg span of 80 mm (3.1 in).

Dolomedes spiders are covered all over in short, velvety hairs which are unwettable (hydrophobic). This allows them to use surface tension to stand or run on the water, like pond skaters. They can also climb beneath the water, and then air becomes trapped in the body hairs and forms a thin film over the whole surface of the body and legs, giving them the appearance of fine polished silver. Like other spiders, Dolomedes breathe with book lungs beneath their abdomens, and these open into the air film, allowing the spiders to breathe while submerged. The trapped air makes them very buoyant and if they do not hold onto a rock or a plant stem they float to the surface where they pop onto the surface film, completely dry.

Source [link]
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Tadpoles are young amphibians that usually live in the water, though some tadpoles may be terrestrial. During the tadpole stage of the amphibian life cycle, most respire by means of autonomous external or internal gills. They do not usually have arms or legs until the transition to adulthood, and typically have dorsal or fin-like appendages and a tail with which they swim by lateral undulation, similar to most fish.

As a tadpole matures, it most commonly metamorphosizes by gradually growing limbs (usually the legs first, followed by the arms) and then (most commonly in the case of frogs) outwardly absorbing its tail by apoptosis. Lungs develop around the time of leg development, and tadpoles late in development will often be found near the surface of the water, where they breathe air. During the final stages of external metamorphosis, the tadpole's mouth changes from a small, enclosed mouth at the front of the head to a large mouth the same width as the head. The intestines shorten to accommodate the new diet. Most tadpoles are herbivorous, subsisting on algae and plants. Some species are omnivorous, eating detritus and when available, smaller tadpoles.

Source [link]
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Weevil, a tiny beetle that does enormous damage to growing plants and stored grains. There are more than 40,000 known species of weevils. The mouthparts of a typical weevil are formed into a long snout. There is an antenna on each side of the snout. In a number of species, the snout is longer than the body, which seldom grows to half an inch (13 mm) in length.

The snout is used not only for feeding but also for making cavities in which the eggs are laid in buds, fruits, seeds, stems, and roots of plants. When the grubs (larvae) emerge, they feed within the plant parts. Infested fruits fall from the trees, or become stunted, scarred, or wormy, and are generally unfit to eat. Buds and seeds are destroyed by weevils and their larvae, and plants are weakened by their attacks.

A weevil’s snout, or nose, is curved downward so that it can bore into plants. At the end of the long snout are the weevil’s mouth parts that chew fruits, seeds, and other plant parts.

Different kinds of weevils have different kinds of snout shapes. Each shape is adapted to eating certain plants or parts of plants. For example, the female nut weevil’s snout is often longer than its body. It needs a long snout to bore through the hard shell of a nut and to lay its eggs inside.

The boll weevil is Anthonomus grandis; plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar; alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica; grain weevil, Sitophilus granarius; rice weevil, S. oryzae; acorn weevil, Curculio rectus. These weevils are snout beetles, or snout weevils, forming the family Curculionidae of the order Coleoptera. Seed weevils, which are smaller than snout beetles and lack the snout, form the family Bruchidae. The cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus, is an example.

Source [link]
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:bulletpink:99/365
:bulletpink:For more "365 days" photos click here ---> [link] <---
:bulletpink:Facebook Fan Page ---> [link] <---
:thumb315444676:
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:bulletorange:94/365
:bulletyellow:For more "365 days" photos click here ---> [link] <---
:bulletorange:Facebook Fan Page ---> [link] <---
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Taken in Seattle, Washington
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Taken in Seattle, Washington
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My facebook: [link]
Photo by Duy Truong: [link]
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So my photographer Mike Schalk went shopping and bought a bunch of cool tees, and he loved them so much that he contacted the supplier! The supplier of Bowery Supply Co sent him a few freebies, only asking for a couple photos of him wearing them for his blog. Well, Mike mentioned that he is a professional photographer, and the next day there were 25 shirts at his door!
I cut 3 of them and wore them in this super cool road trip style shoot in a vintage VW buss (thank you Jess for letting us use your sweet ride and for taking care of us in the Florida summer heat haha).
I think the supplier will like the shots! :D

Photo by Michael Schalk www.flickr.com/photos/thatkids…
Buss via Jess
Shirts from boweryclothing.com/
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Photographer: Kendra Paige :iconkendra-paige:
MUA: Adrianna Oneill
Hair: Julia Sullivan of David K Space
Designer: Born Twice
Assistants: Christopher Paul Chetwood
Lindsay Sherer
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Swarm of bats. Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Borneo.

D300s, TCx2, Nikkor 70-300 VR
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Captured yesterday... Cyanistes caeruleus

D300s, Nikkor 70-300VR
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Beautiful scorpion from Borneo, probably Heterometrus. Kornelia found it in Poring Hot springs, in her dressing room. Most people would escape... but not Kornelia ;)

D700, Nikkor Micro 60/2.8D, natural light
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A quick teaser of some of my new customs coming soon!! :D:D

-MHSQ
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Another of Gorgana! Look for her on Ebay soon!

-MHSQ
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She was very lovely when she was young! I think her hair came out very cute :)

-MHSQ
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Model Ilya
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Model Anna
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Model David Lurs @davidlurs
Model Agent Andrei Korniv @esmodelsru
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Not the image quality I hoped for, but okey. I still liked this shot. Bird can be mean!
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Photoshop action by *lieveheersbeestje

Blog: [link]
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Picture taken in Oostmahorn, Anjum, The Netherlands

Blog:[link]
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