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Albatros Dr I

No less than eleven manufacturers produced triplane, single seat fighters in the summer of 1917, including Albatros, whose Dr I simply married a new triplane wing to an otherwise standard DV airframe.
When triplanes seemed to hold the most promise as fighters a number of designs were put forward. This Albalros DrI was built in 1917 - and as can be clearly seen it was essentially an Albatros DV with an extra wing added.


This machine, built in 1917, was virtually a D V fitted with three sets of wings to assess the triplane layout. All wings were of parallel chord with ailerons, connected by link struts, at all tips. It would seem no advantage was gained with this layout, and the type was not proceeded with. Engine, 160 h.p. Mercedes D III. Span, 8.7 m. (28 ft. 6 5/8 in.). Length, 7.3 m. (23 ft. 11 1/2 in.). Height, 2.42 m. (7 ft 11 1/4 in.). Armament, twin Spandau machine-guns.
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In April, the Allies launched a joint ground offensive, with the British attacking near Arras in Artois, northern France, while the French Nivelle Offensive was launched on the Aisne. Their air forces were called on to provide support, predominantly in reconnaissance and artillery spotting.

The Battle of Arras began on 9 April 1917. In support, the RFC deployed 25 squadrons, totalling 365 aircraft, about ⅓ of which were fighters (or "scouts" as they were called at the time). There were initially only five German Jastas (fighter squadrons) in the region, but this rose to eight as the battle progressed (some 80 or so operational fighter aircraft in total).

Since September 1916, the Germans had held the upper hand in the perpetual contest for air supremacy on the Western Front, with the twin-lMG 08 machine gun-armed Albatros D.II and D.III outclassing the British and French fighters charged with protecting the vulnerable B.E.2c, F.E.2b and Sopwith 1˝ Strutter two-seater reconnaissance and bomber machines. The allied fighter squadrons were equipped with obsolete 'pushers' such as the Airco DH.2 and F.E.8, and other outclassed types such as the Nieuport 17. Only the SPAD S.VII, Sopwith Pup and Triplane could compete on equal terms with the Albatros, but these were few in number and spread along the front. The new generation of Allied fighters were not yet ready for service, although No. 56 Squadron RFC with the S.E.5 was working up to operational status in France. The Bristol F2A also made its debut with No. 48 Squadron during April, but lost heavily on its very first patrol, with four out of six shot down in an encounter with five Albatros D.IIIs of Jasta 11, led by Manfred von Richthofen.

During April 1917, the British lost 245 aircraft, 211 aircrew killed or missing and 108 as prisoners of war. The German Air Services lost 66 aircraft from all causes. As a comparison, in the five months of 1916's Battle of the Somme the RFC had suffered 576 casualties. Under Richthofen's leadership, Jasta 11 scored 89 victories during April, over a third of the British losses.

The month marked the nadir of the RFC's fortunes. However, despite the losses inflicted, the German Air Service failed to stop the RFC carrying out its prime objectives. The RFC continued to support the army throughout the Arras offensive with up-to-date aerial photographs, reconnaissance information and harassing bombing raids. In spite of their ascendancy, the German squadrons continued to be used defensively, flying for the most part behind their own lines. Thus the Jastas established "air superiority", but certainly not air supremacy.

Within a couple of months the new technologically advanced generation of fighter (the SE.5, Sopwith Camel, and SPAD S.XIII) entered service in numbers and quickly gained ascendancy over the over-worked Jastas. As the fighter squadrons became able to once more adequately protect the slower reconnaissance and artillery observation machines, RFC losses fell and German losses rose.

This was essentially the last time that the Germans possessed real air superiority for the rest of the war — although the degree of allied dominance in the air certainly varied.

Background by [link]
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On 25th of July, around 19:50, Lothar Freiherr von Richthofen shot down a Camel somewhere over Fismes, France. It was his 30th victory! I have no idea if this is anywhere near to how it could look but surely this report inspired me to create this image, LvR getting his 30th victory.
Lothar gets level again while the poor chap in the Camel, badly wounded, turns his last pirouette trying to control his burning aircraft. The pilot of the Camel will remain unidentified, giving his life just as "No 30".
Rendered in C4D, post processed in Photoshop, 3D model from Pavel Zoch and can be bought here: [link], background from CGTextures and myself, Camel aircraft from RoF.
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Just keep learning settings and testing rendering techniques. This is another one of these test renderings, tried to recreate a well known photo of WWI ace pilot Werner Voss in front of his Fokker Dr.1 F.I Triplane. I know it´s not that accurate, it´s the feeling I was after.
Rendered in C4D, post processed in Photoshop. 3D model of the Triplane by Pavel Zoch, textures are mine, background from piratelotus-stock here at DA.
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Another test rendering with the wonderful model of Pavel Zoch, this time with the colors of Lothat von Richthofen, the brother of the famous "Red Baron". The background comes from rOEN911 [link] and it´s only a small part of the original, which looks fantastic! Thanks mate! I´m not really happy with this rendering, I really have to tweak the materials on this quite a lot but I´m more concentrated at the moment on learning the software than tweaking details, so it´s really just a rough "artwork". Not to forget, the Camel comes from "Rise of Flight".
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Nieuport 17. (WWI)
N2779. Flown by Lt. Rene Carre' of Escadrille N.112 and brought down by the German pilot Ltn. Pfifer
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Aviatik 30.40

WW1..over Europe....1918

[link]
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North American P-51A Mustang
Major R T Smith
1st Air Commando Group
CBI theatre
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Payware corsair from falling pixel. Composited and rendered in Lightwave. It was done as an exercise in compositing using a backdrop and ground plane.
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Two Spitfires roll into the attack over the English south coast
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P-51 heading home.
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A British S.E.5a aircraft attempts to destroy a German supply train locomotive in the French countryside during WWI.

Credit: This is a "screenshot" from "Rise of Flight" game as I atempted to fly several strafing runs in an attempt to destroy the locomotive. Painted and edited with GIMP.

Thanks for Looking. Cheers, Mike
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A British Airco D.H. 2 destroys a German observation balloon but has paid for it. The aircraft has also been destroyed by a German anti-aircraft gun called a "flaming onion" which was a 37 mm revolving-barrel anti-aircraft gun used by the German army during World War I, the name referring to both the gun, and especially the flares it fired. The term could also be applied to any sort of anti-aircraft fire that used a visible tracer.

The actual weapon was a Gatling type, smooth bore, short barreled automatic revolver called a 'lichtspucker' (light spitter) that was designed to fire flares at low velocity in rapid sequence across a battle area. This gun had five barrels and could launch a 37 mm artillery shell about five thousand feet (1500 m). To maximize the chance of a strike, all five rounds were discharged as rapidly as possible, giving the 'string of flaming onions' effect. Because most other rounds were fired slowly due to the nature of anti-aircraft artillery at the time, this gun's rapid rate of fire left many fliers thinking that the rounds were attached to a string and they feared being shredded by it.

Credits: The aircraft, balloon and groundwork is based on a flight from Rise of Flight, the sky is from my collections of mayyang.com skies. All editing done with GIMP.
Thanks for Looking.
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Two Fokker VIII's battle a lone Sopwith Camel, somewhere over France during WW I.

Credits: The aircraft models from "Rise of Flight" and the BG is from mayyang.com sky photo.

Thanks for Loking. Cheers, Mike
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The Sopwith F.1 Camel entered service in 1917 and was one of the most successful Allied fighter of WW1. It was agile and fast, but prone to spinning, but despite that it went on to claim over 1,200 combat victories.

By 1918 it was being replaced by more advanced aircraft, but continued in use in the ground attack role until the end of the war.

The Camel was flown by the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Navy Air Service, and also the RAF in 1918 when it was formed from the two services. Ten other countries also flew the Camel.

The Camel was armed with 2 x 7.7mm machine guns.

This example is an F.I of the Estonian Navy, circa 1920.
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The Sopwith F.1 Camel entered service in 1917 and was one of the most successful Allied fighter of WW1. It was agile and fast, but prone to spinning, but despite that it went on to claim over 1,200 combat victories.

By 1918 it was being replaced by more advanced aircraft, but continued in use in the ground attack role until the end of the war.

The Camel was flown by the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Navy Air Service, and also the RAF in 1918 when it was formed from the two services. Ten other countries also flew the Camel.

The Camel was armed with 2 x 7.7mm machine guns.

This example is an F.I of 28 Squadron RFC, circa 1917.

Print available in the US here:
www.zazzle.com/claveworksusa

Print available in the UK here:
www.zazzle.co.uk/claveworks
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The Sopwith F.1 Camel entered service in 1917 and was one of the most successful Allied fighter of WW1. It was agile and fast, but prone to spinning, but despite that it went on to claim over 1,200 combat victories.

By 1918 it was being replaced by more advanced aircraft, but continued in use in the ground attack role until the end of the war.

The Camel was flown by the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Navy Air Service, and also the RAF in 1918 when it was formed from the two services. Ten other countries also flew the Camel.

The Camel was armed with 2 x 7.7mm machine guns.

This example is an F.I of 9 Escadrille, Belgian Air Force, circa 1917.

Print available in the US here:
www.zazzle.com/claveworksusa

Print available in the UK here:
www.zazzle.co.uk/claveworks
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2 Albatros V in formation.
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A squadron of BF-110 E-2 starting a diving attack bombing on a British airfield somewhere in the lybian desert. Some P40E are stationing on the airfield.
The landscape has been inspired by a photo from the real Lybian desert.
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The final version
a schwalbe of Messerschmitt 262 (JG11) was the world's first operational jet-powered fighter aircraft.
I'm not sure about the markings...
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One pilots fate lies in the hand of an enemy, what will he choose.

I took out some of the sharpness of the planes to try and match the background, so it's not terribly crisp. Models by Bazze.

Rendered in Strata
Finished with Photoshop
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Flight of Spitfires patrols over Malta
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Two 190's cruise over snow covered mountains
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Simple beautiy shot of a Sopwith Camel.
The aircraft isfrom a screenshot taken in Microsoft Flight Simulator and then blended into a photograph background.
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Bazze's Spitfire model (www.colacola.se)
Lightwave 10.1
CS3
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F/A 18G "Growler"
CAG bird

Rendered in LW 10.1
Post processed in CS3

Background photo by B McKain
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Goodyear F2G-1 Super Corsair

The Goodyear F2G "Super" Corsair was a development by the Goodyear Aircraft Company of the FG-1/F4U-1 Corsair design as a special low-altitude version of a fighter equipped with a Pratt & Whitney R-4360 twenty-eight cylinder, four row radial air-cooled engine. Although often cited that the origin of the aircraft was as an interceptor of low-flying Japanese suicide airplanes, its actual beginnings came about in 1939 when the Pratt and Whitney company first proposed its enormous new engine. Thus the F2G lineage was tied to its engine design rather than tactical requirements.

Design and development
A U.S. Navy F2G-1 in 1945.

Using experience from building the fixed-wing FG-1, a version of the folding wing F4U-1 Corsair, in early 1944, Goodyear extensively modified a standard FG-1 airframe, designated the XF2G-1, to take advantage of the 50% increase in take-off power provided by the R-4360 engine. In addition, an all-round vision bubble-type canopy was installed. In March 1944, Goodyear was awarded a contract to deliver 418 F2G-1 and 10 F2G-2 aircraft. The F2G-2 version included modifications for carrier operations.

Armament provisions included alternative wing-mounted installations for four or six 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine guns and eight 5 inch (127 mm) rockets or two 1,000 or 1,600 lb (450 or 725 kg) bombs. The internal fuel capacity was increased greatly over that of the FG-1, and provisions were provided to carry two droppable external tanks.

By the end of the war in August 1945, only five each of the F2G-1 and F2G-2 aircraft were completed. Testing revealed deficiencies in lateral control and insufficient speed, which were bars to further development of the aircraft. Thus, further production of the fighters was canceled.
[edit] Racing

Only three of the "Super Corsairs" are still in existence:

* F2G-1 BuNo 88454, the first production aircraft, was acquired from the Marine Corps by the Champlin Fighter Museum, and later came to the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington, with the rest of the Champlin collection. [1]
* The fifth F2G-1, BuNo 88458, was purchased by Cook Cleland, who went on to finish first in the 1947 Thompson Trophy Race and first in the 1949 Tinnerman Trophy Race. Over time, the plane, registered as NX5588N, went from owner to owner and slowly deteriorated. Finally, in 1996, NX5588N was purchased by Bob Odegaard of North Dakota, and was returned to airworthy condition in 1999. The aircraft is currently on loan to the Fargo Air Museum.Odegaard raced the plane in the Unlimited class at the Reno Air Races from 2006 to 2008 and it was featured in the movie Thunder Over Reno.


General characteristics

* Crew: 1
* Length: 33 ft 9 in (10.3 m)
* Wingspan: 41 ft (12.5 m)
* Height: 16 ft 1 in (4.9 m)
* Wing area: 314 ft˛ (29 m˛)
* Empty weight: 10,249 lb (4,649 kg)
* Loaded weight: 13,346 lb (6,054 kg)
* Max takeoff weight: 15,422 lb (6,995 kg)
* Powerplant: 1× Pratt & Whitney R-4360-4 "Wasp Major" 28-cylinder radial engine, 3,000 hp (2,200 kW)

Performance

* Maximum speed: 431 mph (374 knots, 694 km/h) at 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
* Range: 1,955 mi (1,699 nm, 3,146 km) with external tanks
* Service ceiling: 38,800 ft (11,800 m)
* Rate of climb: 7,000 ft/min (35.6 m/s)
* Wing loading: 42.5 lb/ft˛ (208 kg/m˛)
* Power/mass: 0.22 hp/lb (370 W/kg)

Armament

* Guns: 4× .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns, 400 rounds/gun
* Rockets: 8× 5 in (127 mm) rockets or
* Bombs: 1,600 lb (725 kg)
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Arado E 555-1

Arado Ar. E. 555/1 Overview

The Ar.E.555/1 long range bomber concept was part of a design study conducted by Dr. Ing. W. Laute and an Arado design group at the Arado Werks at Landeshut/Schesien. The E.555 study was looking at the advantages of a jet powered planar flying wing. It would combine the wing and body of the airframe together with laminar flow characteristics to provide high cruise speed and long range. As many as 10 (some sources say 11) different variations were studied. These were limited to study only. The RLM decreed on December 28, 1944, all heavy bomber activities be ended. The strain on the aircraft industry to supply enough defensive fighters to stop the around-the-clock bombing of German war assets was given the highest priority. Thus the E.555 series of designs remained as studies only.
Arado Ar. E. 555/1 Historical Details

As early as 1897, German military thinkers were looking at the United States as a possible adversary. Naval Lt. Eberhard von Mantry looked into the possibilities of a seaborne invasion of New York. In 1903 a study was conducted by the Kreigsmarine’s Chief of Staff to capture the Panama Canal and disrupt US Navy activities. By 1904 the US Navy was beginning a build-up to counter problems arising in Central and South America. This put an end to the Kreigsmarine’s plans. Again in 1917, as US forces became involved in the fight in France, German High Command began to look into aerial attacks on the US using airships and long range aircraft. Airships of the day could fly the required distances, but the weather conditions that would be encountered would have made the missions very dangerous. There were no bomber aircraft capable of the range required.

When the First World War ended, German military aviation was outlawed. Almost immediately, however, plans were put into place to keep military aviation activities continuing out of general view. The 1920’s saw German aviation restricted to some small civil airlines and sport glider activities.

The 1930’s saw the rise of the Nazi party and a complete change of national attitude and the planning of rearming the German military.

The newly reconstituted Luftwaffe began building new aircraft of all types. The leaders of this new air force, for the most part veterans of World War I, saw the Luftwaffe as the air artillery to help the Wehrmacht to apply it’s newly developed ‘Blitzkrieg” tactics. Tactical attack aircraft did not require long range and large bomb load capabilities.

However, there were some in this new organization who saw the coming need for a strategic capability. This new Luftwaffe’s Chief of Staff, Generalleutnant Walter Weaver was one who saw the importance of a strategic capability of the Luftwaffe. The “Ural Bomber” program was developing when GenLt. Weaver was killed in a crash in 1936.

His successor, GenLt. Albert Kesselring believed that the primary need of the Luftwaffe was dive bombers and medium twin-engine tactical bombers. The feeling amongst the German military was that the coming war would be a series of short intense engagements and it would not last very long. Germany’s enemies would be defeated before a need to carry the battle long distances would be necessary.

Nevertheless, a Bomber "A" program was instituted, which resulted in the development of the Me 264, He 177 and the Ta 400 long range bomber studies. The Me 264 “Amerika Bomber” and the He 177 Grief were both constructed. The Ta 400 remained a design study. These aircraft suffered from engine and system problems and were never effective bombers.

The German aircraft industry was not capable of building many highly sophisticated bomber aircraft requiring advanced assembly techniques. Demands for primarily single seat day fighters dominated the production capacities of the aircraft industry. Pressurized crew cabins, engines with turbo and super charging, reliable jet engines, remote optical and radar controlled defensive gun positions were some of the challenges facing them. The capacity to build these complex aircraft quickly to meet the changing war situation did not exist.

The Bomber “B” program was instituted to develop successors to the Ju88, Do17/215, and the He111. Many design studies were submitted. The most promising were the Do317, an improved Do217, the Ar.E.340, the Fw191 and the Ju288. The Ar.E.340 remained a design study because of its unusual twin boom layout. The Do317 did not offer enough improvement over the Do217 to merit production. Both the Fw191 and the Ju288 were not able to reach their full potential because of the failure and cancellation of the Jumo222 engine program. Failure of the German conventional and jet engine industries to deliver the next generation of engines to “B” bomber airframes meant they were doomed to failure.

For example, the Ju288 flew with BMW801G, C, TJ and the Jumo222A/B and the DB606A/B and also the DB610 A/B. Much time and materials were spent mating the different engine configurations to the airframe. The engines themselves suffered production problems and most never produced the power they were designed to.

Starting in 1942, the Luftwaffe, the RLM and even Goring and Hitler seemed to vacillate between the need to develop strategic “Wonder” weapons and the need to produce vast amounts of defensive conventional weaponry. In a Sept.17th meeting with Goring, a plan which became known as “3 x 1000 “was put forth. It called for a design capable of carrying 1000kg of bombs at 1000km/h with a useful range of 1000 km. In the end, the pressure brought to bear on all aspects of the German armament industries by Allied strategic forces prevented most of the “Wonder” designs from becoming reality.

Late in 1943, the development think tank of Arado’s Landeshut/Silesia works under the leadership of Dr. Ing. W. Laute began to study the feasibility of a flying wing bomber. Using a laminar flow planar wing shape and jet engine power, they hoped to develop a bomber design capable of high altitude, high speed and long range. They studied 10 (some sources say 11, 14 or15.) variations of the basic design. In mid 1944 the RLM issued a specification to Arado to develop one of those design studies into a bomber capable of crossing the ocean. They picked the E.555/1 to develop. The E.555/1 explored the concept of a planar wing planform with the fuselage blending into the wing to increase its efficiency. The goal of the study was to design a bomber for transatlantic operations. Due to problems with all the various first generation jet and turbojet engines with reliability and production quality, the engines were mounted on a plinth between the twin tails and at the trailing edge of the fuselage. This configuration eliminated intake and exhaust ducting problems. The exhaust was also clear of the airframe structure. If engine changes or the configurations of engines changed, there is no need to modify the airframe itself.

The crew for this version consisted of a pilot and bombardier/navigator in a pressurized glass cockpit with an engineer/gunner position in the fuselage proper. The gunner had control of both the forward and tail remotely controlled gun turrets His position was to be equipped with both radar and optical controls. He would also monitor and adjust critical aircraft systems and help the pilot maintain optimum balance for changing conditions during very long, high altitude missions to be flown in the very cold stratosphere. The pilot has control of two fuselage mounted forward firing cannons and the bombardier/navigator could also control the forward turret to defend against frontal attack. The design called for the bomb load to be carried completely internally. The range penalty of external bomb and fuel tank racks excluded their use. Because the engines were totally external to the airframe, the E.555 could have a substantial bomb bay. It could be more flexible with bomb loads and the possibilities of extra fuel tanks for super long-range missions. The possibilities of mounting cameras for photo/recon missions would also be considerable. It would have also been capable of carrying an atomic weapon, had one been available.

On December 28, 1944, the RLM bowed to the pressure on the aircraft industries for delivering defensive fighters and announced that all bomber and reconnaissance aircraft production cease to concentrate on fighter aircraft. The Ar.E.555 design studies remained studies and the war ended. The Luftwaffe failed to see the importance of strategic air power and was defeated in part by the Allied use of it. The quality of replacement pilots suffered in part by lack of fuel for training sorties. End of war inspections of factories revealed concealed parks filled with new aircraft with empty fuel tanks. The ability of the Allied forces to use the entire United Kingdom as a gigantic aircraft carrier and put pressure on German industrial infrastructure both night and day helped to shorten the war in Europe.
Luft/Maybe

Picture this in your mind for a moment: If the war had gone a different way, you might have seen E.555s going in one direction and B-36s in the other, over the Atlantic. The B-36 was the ultimate model of the propeller-driven intercontinental strategic bomber. The USAAC leaders saw the importance of strategic airpower and began investing early in the 1930’s. With the XB-15 and XB-19 they studied the harsh realities of the problems involved. The B-17 and B-24 programs were in place as the war began. The B-29 and B-32 programs were moving into position later in the war. The B-35 and the B-36 were to be the next and last prop programs. They would have been truly intercontinental bombers.

By Bruce Van Auken

Type: Long-range bomber Arado acre E.555-1
Drive: 6 jet engines BMW 003
Wingspan: 21.2 m
Length: 18.4 m
Height: 6.4 m
Wing area: 125 m ˛
Maximum speed: 915 km/h
Maximum air route: 4,800 km
Takeoff weight: 24,000 kilograms
Bomb load: 4000 kilograms
Crew 3: Pilot, radar observer and navigator on catapult seats in a pressurized cabin.
Armament: two cannons M 103 - 30mm in the wing roots
two machine guns magnesium 151 - 20mm behind the cockpit
two machine guns magnesium 151 20mm in the tail dome
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With its Me-262 jet fighter being a proven success, Messerschmitt subsequently proposed numerous variations on its battle-tested airframe. One of these was a three-man high-speed interceptor with in-wing engines: the HG III. Ultimately, this was little more than a "paper project," as no HG IIIs were ever produced.

General characteristics

Crew: 1
Length: 10.60 m (34 ft 9 in)
Wingspan: 12.60 m (41 ft 6 in)
Height: 3.50 m (11 ft 6 in)
Wing area: 21.7 m˛ (234 ft˛)
Empty weight: 3,795 kg[84] (8,366 lb)
Loaded weight: 6,473 kg[84] (14,272 lb)
Max. takeoff weight: 7,130 kg[84] (15,720 lb)
Powerplant: 2 × Junkers Jumo 004 B-1 turbojets, 8.8 kN (1,980 lbf) each
Aspect ratio: 7.32

Performance

Maximum speed: 900 km/h (559 mph)
Range: 1,050 km (652 mi)
Service ceiling: 11,450 m (37,565 ft)
Rate of climb: 1,200 m/min (At max weight of 7,130 kg) (3,900 ft/min)
Thrust/weight: 0.28

Armament

Guns: 4 × 30 mm MK 108 cannons (A-2a: two cannons)
Rockets: 24 × 55 mm (2.2 in) R4M rockets
Bombs: 2 × 250 kg (550 lb) bombs or 2 × 500 kg (1,100 lb) bombs (A-2a only)
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