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In April, the Allies launched a joint ground offensive, with the British attacking near Arras in Artois, northern France, while the French Nivelle Offensive was launched on the Aisne. Their air forces were called on to provide support, predominantly in reconnaissance and artillery spotting.

The Battle of Arras began on 9 April 1917. In support, the RFC deployed 25 squadrons, totalling 365 aircraft, about ⅓ of which were fighters (or "scouts" as they were called at the time). There were initially only five German Jastas (fighter squadrons) in the region, but this rose to eight as the battle progressed (some 80 or so operational fighter aircraft in total).

Since September 1916, the Germans had held the upper hand in the perpetual contest for air supremacy on the Western Front, with the twin-lMG 08 machine gun-armed Albatros D.II and D.III outclassing the British and French fighters charged with protecting the vulnerable B.E.2c, F.E.2b and Sopwith 1˝ Strutter two-seater reconnaissance and bomber machines. The allied fighter squadrons were equipped with obsolete 'pushers' such as the Airco DH.2 and F.E.8, and other outclassed types such as the Nieuport 17. Only the SPAD S.VII, Sopwith Pup and Triplane could compete on equal terms with the Albatros, but these were few in number and spread along the front. The new generation of Allied fighters were not yet ready for service, although No. 56 Squadron RFC with the S.E.5 was working up to operational status in France. The Bristol F2A also made its debut with No. 48 Squadron during April, but lost heavily on its very first patrol, with four out of six shot down in an encounter with five Albatros D.IIIs of Jasta 11, led by Manfred von Richthofen.

During April 1917, the British lost 245 aircraft, 211 aircrew killed or missing and 108 as prisoners of war. The German Air Services lost 66 aircraft from all causes. As a comparison, in the five months of 1916's Battle of the Somme the RFC had suffered 576 casualties. Under Richthofen's leadership, Jasta 11 scored 89 victories during April, over a third of the British losses.

The month marked the nadir of the RFC's fortunes. However, despite the losses inflicted, the German Air Service failed to stop the RFC carrying out its prime objectives. The RFC continued to support the army throughout the Arras offensive with up-to-date aerial photographs, reconnaissance information and harassing bombing raids. In spite of their ascendancy, the German squadrons continued to be used defensively, flying for the most part behind their own lines. Thus the Jastas established "air superiority", but certainly not air supremacy.

Within a couple of months the new technologically advanced generation of fighter (the SE.5, Sopwith Camel, and SPAD S.XIII) entered service in numbers and quickly gained ascendancy over the over-worked Jastas. As the fighter squadrons became able to once more adequately protect the slower reconnaissance and artillery observation machines, RFC losses fell and German losses rose.

This was essentially the last time that the Germans possessed real air superiority for the rest of the war — although the degree of allied dominance in the air certainly varied.

Background by [link]
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Ok another Historical Art,the story.....At 14 Jun 1918 09:00 with Jasta 6 Capt. Hans Kirschstein Destroy His first and last observation Balloon above Villers-Cotteręts which belonged In French observation unit....
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Nieuport 17. (WWI)
N2779. Flown by Lt. Rene Carre' of Escadrille N.112 and brought down by the German pilot Ltn. Pfifer
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Aviatik 30.40

WW1..over Europe....1918

[link]
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FIATG55
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On 25th of July, around 19:50, Lothar Freiherr von Richthofen shot down a Camel somewhere over Fismes, France. It was his 30th victory! I have no idea if this is anywhere near to how it could look but surely this report inspired me to create this image, LvR getting his 30th victory.
Lothar gets level again while the poor chap in the Camel, badly wounded, turns his last pirouette trying to control his burning aircraft. The pilot of the Camel will remain unidentified, giving his life just as "No 30".
Rendered in C4D, post processed in Photoshop, 3D model from Pavel Zoch and can be bought here: [link], background from CGTextures and myself, Camel aircraft from RoF.
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Another test rendering with the wonderful model of Pavel Zoch, this time with the colors of Lothat von Richthofen, the brother of the famous "Red Baron". The background comes from rOEN911 [link] and it´s only a small part of the original, which looks fantastic! Thanks mate! I´m not really happy with this rendering, I really have to tweak the materials on this quite a lot but I´m more concentrated at the moment on learning the software than tweaking details, so it´s really just a rough "artwork". Not to forget, the Camel comes from "Rise of Flight".
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Rendered in Blender 2.6, a recreation of a well known wartime photo.
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P-51 heading home.
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Composited and rendered in Lightwave.
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Another early photoshop work.
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A British S.E.5a aircraft attempts to destroy a German supply train locomotive in the French countryside during WWI.

Credit: This is a "screenshot" from "Rise of Flight" game as I atempted to fly several strafing runs in an attempt to destroy the locomotive. Painted and edited with GIMP.

Thanks for Looking. Cheers, Mike
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A British Airco D.H. 2 destroys a German observation balloon but has paid for it. The aircraft has also been destroyed by a German anti-aircraft gun called a "flaming onion" which was a 37 mm revolving-barrel anti-aircraft gun used by the German army during World War I, the name referring to both the gun, and especially the flares it fired. The term could also be applied to any sort of anti-aircraft fire that used a visible tracer.

The actual weapon was a Gatling type, smooth bore, short barreled automatic revolver called a 'lichtspucker' (light spitter) that was designed to fire flares at low velocity in rapid sequence across a battle area. This gun had five barrels and could launch a 37 mm artillery shell about five thousand feet (1500 m). To maximize the chance of a strike, all five rounds were discharged as rapidly as possible, giving the 'string of flaming onions' effect. Because most other rounds were fired slowly due to the nature of anti-aircraft artillery at the time, this gun's rapid rate of fire left many fliers thinking that the rounds were attached to a string and they feared being shredded by it.

Credits: The aircraft, balloon and groundwork is based on a flight from Rise of Flight, the sky is from my collections of mayyang.com skies. All editing done with GIMP.
Thanks for Looking.
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A Sopwith Camel takes its final plunge to earth after a dogfight with a Fokker D-VII, somewhere over the Somme River, France.

Credit: AC models from "Rise of Flight", the BG is from a mayyang.com sky.

Thanks for looking. Cheers, Mike
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A6M5c Zero vs. F6F-5 Hellcat.
The marking shows Saburō Sakai's last plane, ヨ-137 Yokosuka Naval air group.
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a bombing mission in the gloaming.
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586-го женского ИАП
586 IAP was a women-only fighter unit of the Soviet Air Forces in World War II .
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Trying for a more artsy feel to this one.
Models by Anders Lejczak (www.colacola.se)
Background stock by Caltha Stock.
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Returning to Bazze's great Spitfire model for a little surfacing practice. Trying a way of dirtying the texture up a little.

model from www.colacola.se

Rendered in Lightwave, levels tweaked in CS3
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Ander's Lejczak great F100 Super Sabre
www.colacola.se
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The Fokker E.V / D.VIII was the last fighter airplane put into service by Germany during WWI. The airplane was an advanced design and featured a single parasol wing.

There were some wing failures with some of the early E.V models which caused the unfortunate deaths of several pilots. The failures were traced to faulty workmanship by a subcontractor; the wing design was sound. The problems were corrected and the type was updated as the D.VIII.

By this time the war only had 18 days left so the type saw limited combat. If the war had dragged on many believe the D.VIII would have been the finest airplane of the war up to that time.

My depiction features the airplane in the markings of Leutnant Richard Wenzl during his time as commander of Jasta 6.
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The Roland D.VI was used by Germany during the last year of World War I. It featured unique "clinker built" fuselage contruction consisting of overlapping spruce strakes. Overshadowed by the Fokker D.VII, the Roland D.VI was nonetheless a fine performer. The "D.VIb" model was equipped with the Benz III engine and showed good speed and above average maneuverability. This print features the Roland D.VIb of 18 victory ace Emil Schape of Jasta 33.
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The Grumman F6F Hellcat was the US Navy's answer to the superb Japanese A6M Zero during WWII. Powered by a Pratt & Whitney, 2000 HP radial engine and armed with 6 .50 cal machine guns, the Hellcat was all muscle. Flown from aircraft carriers, the type quickly proved dominant in the Pacific over it's Japanese counterparts. Racking up an impressive 19:1 kill ratio, the Hellcat became known as "the Ace Maker". This print depicts the Navy's all time leading ace, David McCampbell. "Minsi III" was an F6F-5 Hellcat David McCampbell flew in which he scored the last 23-1/2 of his 34 victories.
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2 Albatros V in formation.
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I would like to try to draw another bird : the il-2 sturmovik. I've made him dropping his 2 FAB-100kg and shooting with his two anti-tank gun.
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a draw of the 341 squadron "Alsace" (Free french) passing over the coast the 27 august 1943 at 18h20. The group of four plane is lead by the commandant Mouchotte on his NL-L, Clostermann is the second with his NL-B. During this "sweep", they had to escort a 240 B-17s formation over the belgium. Mouchotte will never come back from this mission... They are flying on the Spitfire mkIXc (early series with the Merlin 61) equiped with a 45 gal tank. (This kind of reservoir were not reliable and could stay locked under the aircraft)

It still needs some work on the landscape....
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1943 modernization of the SU-152 with the chassis of the IS as well as some armor improvements...
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The KV-2 was a Soviet Heavy Tank/Assault Gun developed from the KV-1 in order to provide close support fire.
This tank possessed a huge unwieldy turret that was capable of holding the 122 mm or 152 mm howitzer.

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I drew another KV-2 since I needed to find a vehicle that was enjoyable to draw and view while taking an acceptable amount of time to complete.
This heavy wasn't that difficult, but still took me about 3-4 hours (spread over a two day period) to finish so my search for another fun tank to draw continues :D
Future suggestions are always welcome.
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The Churchill was a British heavy tank in service from 1941 to 1952. Some units were supplied to the USSR during the Second World War. It fought primarily in the European Theatre, but also participated in the North African campaign.

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Usually, I think the hardest part of drawing tanks is the suspension, but this tank was an exception. Most of my time was spent working on the chassis.
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