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Painted in photoshop.
Again, 10 + hours of work.
I love dinosaurs and everything about them.
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Color version of the image known as Blue dawn.
I like both of them just the same , warm version, and the cooler one.
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Brachiosaurus herd. This is small file size but try to notice small birdlike dactyle hunting for fish on the small stream in front :).

Brachiosaurus modeled in Zbrush, rendered in 3ds MAX and comped in photoshop.
Background layered from dozen of photos of my own, digital matte painting is the therm used for this technique.


Cheers
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A pair of Gigantoraptor erlianensis rests amongst the vastness of the ancient Gobi Desert, in a particularly harsh dry season.






*YAY proper background*
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A quick one; A group of Ojoceratops muches on low-growing vegetation while two enormous Alamosaurus pass by in the background. Small flocks of birds greet the sunrise.

Post at TCP
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Lurdusaurus, the semi-aquatic african iguanodontian, perhaps very similar in habits to modern-day hippopotamus.

It hasn't been very widely illustrated, AFAIK. So here's my contribution :)

Based on the - I think - only skeletal reconstruction of this animal avaiable, by Pete Buchholz.
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Picture for the International Europasaurus Paleo-Artwork Contest, 2011.
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Illustration for the Russian edition of NatGeo. Sharipovo location. Depicted animals: Kileskus aristotocus, "Shariposaurus", Sunosuchus, Xinjianchelys.
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Amazing ceratops from Kaiparowits Formation, Utah.
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©2009 Paleo-King

The real dragons of China's Lost World:

In the Middle Jurassic of China (Bathonian epoch, 165 million years ago), herds of Shunosaurus lii and the much taller "Omeisaurus" tianfuensis feed near the edge of a landlocked lake that will one day become Dashanpu Quarry in modern Sichuan Province. There were several ancient rivers that fed this lake, filling it with the corpses of dead dinosaurs every flood season. The area is today one of the richest fossil sites in all of Asia.

Both species had tail clubs and large thumb claws for defense. It has been suggested that partial fossils of Omeisaurus (or at least its phenomenal neck) were already known centuries ago, giving rise to the popular Chinese dragon legends.

Note: This is a miniature drawing, with everything crammed onto an 8.5 x 11" page. I used photographs of multiple specimens as well as Gregory Paul's original skeletal diagrams of both species for reference. Special thanks to EmperorDinobot and DerKompsognatus for suggesting the sauropods for this piece.
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An encounter near the edge of a highland forest between a trio of Brachiosaurus altithorax and the very rare basal macronarian sauropod Haplocanthosaurus delfsi, in the Morrison formation in Colorado, 150 million years ago. Stegosaurus armatus also makes a brief appearance.

Suggested background music: [link]

Brachiosaurus altithorax was one of the largest "classic" sauropods of the Morrison formation, with large adults (such as the one formerly known as "Ultrasauros") reaching up to 90 feet in length and weighing 45 tons. Haplocanthosaurus, a distant relative, reached only 50 feet as an adult and was a "living fossil" in its own time, thought to be descended in a direct line from the common ancestor of both brachiosaurs and camarasaurs.
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A Late Jurassic scene in Portugal where the plans of the predator go horribly wrong. Three Torvosaurus tanneri launch an attack against a pair of Dacentrurus armatus only to suffer a literally gut-wrenching casualty.

In the background are the odd long-necked stegosaur Miragaia and the huge brachiosaur Lusotitan.

A little-known fact: Dacentrurus was one of the largest stegosaurs known, if not the largest, with some individuals exceeding Stegosaurus by as much as a meter. Despite this, many artists have incorrectly portrayed it as a much smaller dwarf stegosaur.
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acrylics 2011,
Cetiosauriscus stewarti and a pack of Eustreptospondylus oxoniensis.

Another re-do of an old drawing [link] .
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acrylics 2011,
two azhdarchid pterosaurs and small group of troodontids scavenging on a dead Tarchia gigantea.

This is a re-do of an old ink drawing of mine [link] .

SUGGESTIONS FOR TITLE ARE WELCOME!
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acrylics 2012,
Spinops sternbergorum and Albertaceratops nesmoi.

NOTE: I based the coloration of Albertaceratops on an older painting of mine [link] .
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Сиквел тройки балауров.
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Гуашь А3
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Illustration for International Paleontology Illustration Competition
I International Exhibition of Paleontology Illustration/IPIC 2011
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Corythosaurus render made for SOL 90 S.L. publishing house.
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Illustration for SOL 90 S.L. publishing house.
Pteranodon longiceps.
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Landscape of the Late Cretaceous in North America. Tyrannosaurus rex and ornithomimids.

Software: 3ds max, Zbrush, Photoshop, Vray
2009
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Como Bluff, 1995
(Brachiosaurus brancai,
Apatosaurus ajax,
Dryosaurus altus

Marco Antonio Pineda
Gouache
30.0 x 48.0 cm
Particular collection

Some famous plant eaters from Upper Jurassic of North America. This artwork was made in 1995, according to ideas of Robert T. Baker about paleoenviroment for Como Bluff and Gregory S. Paul and his conception of dinosaurs.

Comments are welcome
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Kritosaurus notabilis, 1993

Marco Antonio Pineda
Pencil
35.0 x 50.0 cm
Particular collection

I made this couple of Kritosaurus several years ago. It was made it in times when this species was discovered in North of Mexico. With those fossils started a succeful contemporary era of dinosaurs discoveres.
Fossil material consist on near 70% of an probable inmature individual, includes both postcraneal and craneal elements.
The specimen has a coloquial name "Isauria"

Comments are welcome
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"A storm comes", 2001
(Anatotitan copei)

Marco Antonio Pineda
pastel
35 x 50 cm
Artist´s collection


A herd of famous duckbilled on a brief race on a cretacic landscape: a opened area with scatered trees, meanwhile, a storm aproaches.
Come on, leave a comment.
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part of sketch for
"The Airbender"

Albertosaurus (pronounced /ælˌbɜrtɵˈsɔrəs/; meaning "Alberta lizard") is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period, more than 70 million years ago. The type species, A. sarcophagus, was restricted in range to the modern-day Canadian province of Alberta, after which the genus is named. Scientists disagree on the content of the genus, with some recognizing Gorgosaurus libratus as a second species.
As a tyrannosaurid, Albertosaurus was a bipedal predator with tiny, two-fingered hands and a massive head with dozens of large, sharp teeth. It may have been at the top of the food chain in its local ecosystem. Although relatively large for a theropod, Albertosaurus was much smaller than its more famous relative Tyrannosaurus, probably weighing less than 2 metric tons.
Since the first discovery in 1884, fossils of more than thirty individuals have been recovered, providing scientists with a more detailed knowledge of Albertosaurus anatomy than is available for most other tyrannosaurids. The discovery of 22 individuals at one site provides evidence of pack behavior and allows studies of ontogeny and population biology which are impossible with lesser-known dinosaurs.
Albertosaurus was smaller than the truly gigantic tyrannosaurids like Tarbosaurus and Tyrannosaurus. Typical adults measured up to 9 meters (30 ft) long, while rare individuals of great age could grow to over 10 meters (33 ft) in length. Several independent mass estimates, obtained by different methods, suggest that an adult Albertosaurus weighed between 1.3 tonnes (1.4 short tons)and 1.7 tonnes (1.9 tons).
The massive skull of Albertosaurus, perched on a short, S-shaped neck, was approximately 1 meter (3.3 ft) long in the largest adults. Wide openings in the skull (fenestrae) reduced the weight of the head while also providing space for muscle attachment and sensory organs. Its long jaws contained more than 60 banana-shaped teeth; larger tyrannosaurids possessed fewer teeth. Unlike most theropods, Albertosaurus and other tyrannosaurids were heterodont, with teeth of different forms depending on their position in the mouth. The premaxillary teeth at the tip of the upper jaw were much smaller than the rest, more closely packed, and D-shaped in cross section.
Above the eyes were short bony crests that may have been brightly colored in life and used in courtship to attract a mate.

Restoration
All tyrannosaurids, including Albertosaurus, shared a similar body appearance. Typically for a theropod, Albertosaurus was bipedal and balanced the heavy head and torso with a long tail. However, tyrannosaurid forelimbs were extremely small for their body size and retained only two digits. The hind limbs were long and ended in a four-toed foot. The first digit, called the hallux, was short and only the other three contacted the ground, with the third (middle) digit longer than the rest. Albertosaurus may have been able to reach speeds of 14−21 kilometers per hour (8−13 miles per hour).
Albertosaurus is a member of the theropod family Tyrannosauridae, in the subfamily Albertosaurinae. Its closest relative is the slightly older Gorgosaurus libratus (sometimes called Albertosaurus libratus; see below). These two species are the only described albertosaurines, although other undescribed species may exist. Thomas Holtz found Appalachiosaurus to be an albertosaurine in 2004, but his more recent unpublished work locates it just outside Tyrannosauridae, in agreement with other authors.
The other major subfamily of tyrannosaurids is the Tyrannosaurinae, including Daspletosaurus, Tarbosaurus and Tyrannosaurus. Compared with these robust tyrannosaurines, albertosaurines had slender builds, with proportionately smaller skulls and longer bones of the lower leg (tibia) and feet (metatarsals and phalanges).
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Fabio Pastori's painting favourite by Mike Fredericks(Prehistoric Times publisher:visit the website![link]

acrylic colours with very thin martin brushes
airbrush 4 background

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
(unranked): Tetanurae or Dilophosauridae
Genus: Cryolophosaurus
Hammer & Hickerson, 1994
Species
C. ellioti Hammer & Hickerson, 1994 (type)
Cryolophosaurus (pronounced /ˌkraɪoʊˌlɒfoʊˈsɔrəs/ or /kraɪˌɒləfəˈsɔrəs/, meaning "cold crest lizard") was a large theropod dinosaur, with a bizarre crest on its head that looked like a Spanish comb. Due to the resemblance of this feature to Elvis Presley's pompadour haircut from the 1950s, this dinosaur was at one point informally known as "Elvisaurus".
Cryolophosaurus was excavated from Antarctica's Early Jurassic Hanson Formation (former the upper Falla Formation) by paleontologist Dr. William Hammer in 1991. It is the first carnivorous dinosaur to be discovered in Antarctica and the first dinosaur of any kind from the continent to be officially named.[1] Dating from the Early Jurassic Period, it was originally described as the earliest known tetanuran, though subsequent studies have found that it is probably more closely related to the dilophosaurs.[2]
Cryolophosaurus was about 6 to 8 meters (20 to 26 feet) long, which is significantly smaller than the largest Allosaurus, which reached up to 12 meters (40 feet) in length.
A high, narrow skull was discovered, 65 centimeters (25 inches) long. The peculiar nasal crest runs just over the eyes, where it rises up perpendicular to the skull and fans out. It is furrowed, giving it a comb-like appearance. It is an extension of the skull bones, near the tear ducts, fused on either side to horns which rise from the eye sockets (orbital horns). While other theropods like the Monolophosaurus have crests, they usually run along the skull instead of across it.[3]
[edit]Classification

"Cryolophosaurus is also of significance because it represents the oldest known tetanuran from any continent — it is the only one from the Early Jurassic."
—William R. Hammer
Classification is difficult because the Cryolophosaurus has a mix of primitive and advanced characteristics. The leg bone (femur) has traits of early theropods, while the skull resembles much later species of the clade Tetanurae, like China's Sinraptor and Yangchuanosaurus. Originally, Hammer and colleagues suspected that Cryolophosaurus might be a ceratosaur or even an early abelisaur, with some traits convergent with those of more advanced tetanurans, but ultimately concluded that it was itself the earliest known member of the tetanuran group.[1] While a subsequent study by Hammer (along with Smith and Currie) again recovered Cryolophosaurus as a tetanuran, a later (2007) study by the same authors found that it was more closely related to Dilophosaurus and Dracovenator than to tetanurans.[3][2]
[link]
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part of sketch for
"The Airbender"

Gorgosaurus (pronounced /ˌɡɔrɡɵˈsɔrəs/ GOR-go-SOR-əs, meaning "fierce lizard") is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period, between about 76.5 and 75 million years ago. Fossil remains have been found in the Canadian province of Alberta and possibly the U.S. state of Montana. Paleontologists recognize only the type species, G. libratus, although other species have been erroneously referred to the genus.
Like most known tyrannosaurids, Gorgosaurus was a bipedal predator weighing more than a metric ton as an adult; dozens of large, sharp teeth lined its jaws, while its two-fingered forelimbs were comparatively small. Gorgosaurus was most closely related to Albertosaurus, and more distantly related to the larger Tyrannosaurus. Gorgosaurus and Albertosaurus are extremely similar, distinguished mainly by subtle differences in the teeth and skull bones. Some experts consider G. libratus to be a species of Albertosaurus; this would make Gorgosaurus a junior synonym of that genus.
Gorgosaurus lived in a lush floodplain environment along the edge of an inland sea. An apex predator, it was at the top of the food chain, preying upon abundant ceratopsids and hadrosaurs. In some areas, Gorgosaurus coexisted with another tyrannosaurid, Daspletosaurus. Though these animals were roughly the same size, there is some evidence of niche differentiation between the two. Gorgosaurus is the best-represented tyrannosaurid in the fossil record, known from dozens of specimens. These plentiful remains have allowed scientists to investigate its ontogeny, life history and other aspects of its biology.
Gorgosaurus was smaller than Tyrannosaurus or Tarbosaurus, closer in size to Albertosaurus and Daspletosaurus. Adults reached 8 or 9 meters (26 to 30 ft) from snout to tail.Paleontologists have estimated full-grown adults to weigh more than 2.4 tonnes (2.7 short tons). The largest known skull measures 99 centimeters (39 in) long, just slightly smaller than that of Daspletosaurus. As in other tyrannosaurids, the skull was large compared to its body size, although chambers within the skull bones and large openings (fenestrae) between bones reduced its weight. Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus share proportionally longer and lower skulls than Daspletosaurus and other tyrannosaurids. The end of the snout was blunt, and the nasal and parietal bones were fused along the midline of the skull, as in all other members of the family. The eye socket was circular rather than oval or keyhole-shaped as in other tyrannosaurid genera. A tall crest rose from the lacrimal bone in front of each eye, similar to Albertosaurus and Daspletosaurus. Differences in the shape of bones surrounding the brain set Gorgosaurus apart from Albertosaurus.

Gorgosaurus teeth were typical of all known tyrannosaurids. The eight premaxillary teeth at the front of the snout were smaller than the rest, closely packed and D-shaped in cross section. In Gorgosaurus, the first tooth in the maxilla was also shaped like the premaxillary teeth. The rest of the teeth were oval in cross section, rather than blade-like as in most other theropods.Along with the eight premaxillary teeth, Gorgosaurus had 26 to 30 maxillary teeth and 30 to 34 teeth in the dentary bones of the lower jaw. This number of teeth is similar to Albertosaurus and Daspletosaurus but is fewer than those of Tarbosaurus or Tyrannosaurus.
Gorgosaurus shared its general body plan with all other tyrannosaurids. Its massive head was perched on the end of an S-shaped neck. In contrast to its large head, its forelimbs were very small. The forelimbs had only two digits, although a third metacarpal is known in some specimens, the vestigial remains of the third digit seen in other theropods. Gorgosaurus had four digits on each hindlimb, including a small first toe (hallux) which did not contact the ground. Tyrannosaurid hindlimbs were long relative to overall body size compared with other theropods. The largest known Gorgosaurus femur measured 105 centimeters (41 in) long. In several smaller specimens of Gorgosaurus, the tibia was longer than the femur, a proportion typical of fast-running animals. The two bones were of equal length in the largest specimens.The long, heavy tail served as a counterweight to the head and torso and placed the center of gravity over the hips.
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When Europe was like the Bahamas...
Featuring Juravenator starki at first plan, a dead Ichthyosaur and scavengers like Compsognathus, Pterodactylus. Rhamphorhynchus is skimming in the center.
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Solnhofen tragedy. Compie steals Archie's meal... Bavarisaurus.
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