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Cut-out detail of forthcoming artwork with background.
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Picture for the International Europasaurus Paleo-Artwork Contest, 2011.
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Artwork for the III International Contest of Scientific Illustration of Dinosaurs.
[link]
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A herd of Corythosaurus, one of the classical duck-billed dinosaurs. Wether browsers or grazers, they were probably always on the move.
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A quick one; A group of Ojoceratops muches on low-growing vegetation while two enormous Alamosaurus pass by in the background. Small flocks of birds greet the sunrise.

Post at TCP
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After Diplodocus, now It's time for Stegosaurus to make their way under Morrison's scorching sun.

Both Paul's and Hartman's skeletal reconstructions were used as reference. Inspiration comes mainly from the beautiful migrating Lambeosaurus by Raul Martín.
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acrylics 2011,
Cetiosauriscus stewarti and a pack of Eustreptospondylus oxoniensis.

Another re-do of an old drawing [link] .
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acrylics 2011,
Portugese theropod Lourinhanosaurus antunesi lurking sauropod Lourinhasaurus alenquerensis, with Rhamphorhynchus sp. flying by.

Another re-do of an old work [link]
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acrylics 2011,
two azhdarchid pterosaurs and small group of troodontids scavenging on a dead Tarchia gigantea.

This is a re-do of an old ink drawing of mine [link] .

SUGGESTIONS FOR TITLE ARE WELCOME!
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Painted in photoshop.
Again, 10 + hours of work.
I love dinosaurs and everything about them.
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Brachiosaurus herd. This is small file size but try to notice small birdlike dactyle hunting for fish on the small stream in front :).

Brachiosaurus modeled in Zbrush, rendered in 3ds MAX and comped in photoshop.
Background layered from dozen of photos of my own, digital matte painting is the therm used for this technique.


Cheers
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First in the series of dino images.
Planing to make about 30-40 illustrations, and if I get the chance, make it into a beautiful illustrated Dinosaur book.

Actual size of the image is about 7000 pixels wide.

Dinosaurs modeled in zbrush, and composited in photoshop, with my panoramic photos as a background.
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Illustration for International Paleontology Illustration Competition
I International Exhibition of Paleontology Illustration/IPIC 2011
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PRINT [link]
Мозазавр на отмели.
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Гуашь А3
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©2009 Paleo-King

The real dragons of China's Lost World:

In the Middle Jurassic of China (Bathonian epoch, 165 million years ago), herds of Shunosaurus lii and the much taller "Omeisaurus" tianfuensis feed near the edge of a landlocked lake that will one day become Dashanpu Quarry in modern Sichuan Province. There were several ancient rivers that fed this lake, filling it with the corpses of dead dinosaurs every flood season. The area is today one of the richest fossil sites in all of Asia.

Both species had tail clubs and large thumb claws for defense. It has been suggested that partial fossils of Omeisaurus (or at least its phenomenal neck) were already known centuries ago, giving rise to the popular Chinese dragon legends.

Note: This is a miniature drawing, with everything crammed onto an 8.5 x 11" page. I used photographs of multiple specimens as well as Gregory Paul's original skeletal diagrams of both species for reference. Special thanks to EmperorDinobot and DerKompsognatus for suggesting the sauropods for this piece.
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A Late Jurassic scene in Portugal where the plans of the predator go horribly wrong. Three Torvosaurus tanneri launch an attack against a pair of Dacentrurus armatus only to suffer a literally gut-wrenching casualty.

In the background are the odd long-necked stegosaur Miragaia and the huge brachiosaur Lusotitan.

A little-known fact: Dacentrurus was one of the largest stegosaurs known, if not the largest, with some individuals exceeding Stegosaurus by as much as a meter. Despite this, many artists have incorrectly portrayed it as a much smaller dwarf stegosaur.
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An encounter near the edge of a highland forest between a trio of Brachiosaurus altithorax and the very rare basal macronarian sauropod Haplocanthosaurus delfsi, in the Morrison formation in Colorado, 150 million years ago. Stegosaurus armatus also makes a brief appearance.

Suggested background music: [link]

Brachiosaurus altithorax was one of the largest "classic" sauropods of the Morrison formation, with large adults (such as the one formerly known as "Ultrasauros") reaching up to 90 feet in length and weighing 45 tons. Haplocanthosaurus, a distant relative, reached only 50 feet as an adult and was a "living fossil" in its own time, thought to be descended in a direct line from the common ancestor of both brachiosaurs and camarasaurs.
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Here's depicts Coelophysoidea meet Heterodontosauridae.
Illustration for chinese book 《Dinosaur Footprints》.
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Title:《Surround》

120cmX 80 cm, Oil on canvas.

Names of all depicted species:
Europasaurus holgeri
Velociraptorine dromaeosaurid

Description:
In the Late Jurassic, an isolated of Europasaurus is surrounded by predators, it tries to strengthen the momentum of the deterrent to offenders.
In this restoration, I try to reference the scute skin of the titanosauridae, covering a armor. And also enhanced the feather performance of dromaeosaurid more mature development.

Here is Working Process video:
[link]
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Theropod(Huaxiagnathus) catching birds(Confuciusornis).
Illustration for chinese book 《Dinosaur Footprints》.
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lobo en la boca, 2000
(Allosaurus atrox /
Apatosaurus ajax)

Marco A. Pineda
acrílico
35,0 x 50,0 cm
colección particular
(Colección Lanzendorf)

Hice esta escena especulativa pero emocionante en dos dinosaurios famosos de todos los tiempos.
Tal vez alosaurios no puede cazar un dinosaurio muy grande como un adulto "brontosaurio", pero algunas pistas sugieren que su probable.
Sin embargo, traté de describir como reptiles muy avanzadas con algunos aspectos que recuerdan las aves (pájaros prehistóricos) en un comportamiento en el desarrollo de estrategias de caza.

Los comentarios son bienvenidos
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Como Bluff, 1995
(Brachiosaurus brancai,
Apatosaurus ajax,
Dryosaurus altus

Marco Antonio Pineda
Gouache
30.0 x 48.0 cm
Particular collection

Some famous plant eaters from Upper Jurassic of North America. This artwork was made in 1995, according to ideas of Robert T. Baker about paleoenviroment for Como Bluff and Gregory S. Paul and his conception of dinosaurs.

Comments are welcome
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Winter morning, 2002
(mañana de invierno)
Ceratosaurus nasicornis

Marco A. Pineda
Acrylic
35.0 x 25.0 cm

A very famous jurassic predator resting on ferns ground, waiting, looking for a prey.

Comments are welcome
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Chasmosaurus shows his false eyes on the frill to protect himself from a young Albertosaurus attack


acrylic colours with martin brushes on cardboard
now property of Museo di Storia Naturale di Milano

Chasmosaurus
Fossil range: Late Cretaceous

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Ornithischia
Suborder: Marginocephalia
Infraorder: Ceratopsia
Superfamily: Ceratopsoidea
Family: Ceratopsidae
Subfamily: Ceratopsinae
Genus: Chasmosaurus
Lambe, 1914
Species
C. belli (Lambe, 1902 [originally Monoclonius belli]) (type)
C. irvinensis Holmes et al., 2001
C. russelli Sternberg, 1940
Chasmosaurus (pronounced /ˌkæzməˈsɔrəs/ KAZ-mo-sawr-us) is a genus of ceratopsid dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Period of North America. Its name means 'opening lizard', referring to the large openings (fenestrae) in its frill (Greek chasma meaning 'opening' or 'hollow' or 'gulf' and sauros meaning 'lizard';). With a length of 5–6 metres (16–20 ft) and a weight of 3.6 tonnes (4.0 short tons), Chasmosaurus was a ceratopsian of average size. Like all ceratopsians, it was purely herbivorous. It was initially to be called Protorosaurus, but this name had been previously published for another animal.
In 1898, Lawrence Lambe of the Geological Survey of Canada made the first discovery of Chasmosaurus remains- part of a neck frill.[1] Although recognizing that his find represented a new species, Lambe thought to be from a previously-known short-frilled ceratopsian - Monoclonius.[1] He erected the new species Monoclonius belli to describe his finding.[1]
However, in 1913, Charles Sternberg and his sons found several complete "M. belli" skulls in Alberta, Canada. These were finally described as the new genus Chasmosaurus in 1914, again by Lawrence M. Lambe.[1] Since that date, more Chasmosaurus remains, including skulls, have been found.[1] There appears to be morphological variation among the known sample of Chasmosaurus skulls.[1]
There are a number of known species of Chasmosaurus. Lambe's original C. belli ('Bell's cleft lizard';) was joined by C. canadensis ('chasm lizard from Canada';) in the same year. The latter species had been described as Eoceratops canadensis by Lambe but was later reclassified as a chasmosaur by Lehman. Lull named an unusual, short-muzzled skull, collected in 1926, C. brevirostris. C. M. Sternberg added C. russelli, in 1940, from southwestern Alberta. The most recently described species is C. irvinensis, which stems from the uppermost beds of the Dinosaur Park Formation.
Thomas Lehman described C. mariscalensis in 1989 from Texas, which has now been renamed Agujaceratops.
Ceratopsians are split into two subfamilies by taxonomists; those with short frills (centrosaurines), such as Centrosaurus and those with long frills (chasmosaurines), of which Chasmosaurus was one. In addition to the larger frill, the long-frilled ceratopsians typically had longer faces and jaws and it is suggested by some paleontologists that they were more selective about the plants they ate. Long frills were a relatively late development in dinosaur evolution, since even Chasmosaurus dates from the late Cretaceous Period, 76 to 70 million years ago. The frill of Chasmosaurus has been described as "heart-shaped", since its bone structure consists of two large 'loops' from a central bone.
Some finds include a number of smaller ossifications (called epoccipitals), which may have grown from the perimeter of the frill. The frill may also have been brightly colored, to draw attention to its size or as part of mating display. However, the frill was so large and yet so flimsy (since it was mainly skin stretched between the bones) that it could not have provided much functional defense. It is possible that it was simply used to appear imposing or conceivably for thermoregulation. In the event of a chasmosaur herd being attacked by a predator (such as Tyrannosaurus), the males could have formed a ring and, with all the frills facing outwards, would have presented a formidable sight.
Like many ceratopsians, chasmosaurs had three main facial horns - one on the nose and two on the brow. Different fossil finds have produced inconclusive results - one species of Chasmosaurus, named C. kaiseni, bore long brow horns, while C. belli had only short ones. Although these were initially named as different species, it now seems possible that the long horns belonged to males and the shorter horns to females.
Interestingly, a Chasmosaurus specimen recovered by Sternberg was accompanied by fossilized skin.[1] The skin appears to have had many bony knobs (osteoderms) in evenly spaced rows,[1] with five or six sides per knob. Unfortunately, nothing can be learned about the coloration of Chasmosaurus from the known fossil skin samples.
[link]
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part of sketch for
"The Airbender"

Albertosaurus (pronounced /ælˌbɜrtɵˈsɔrəs/; meaning "Alberta lizard") is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period, more than 70 million years ago. The type species, A. sarcophagus, was restricted in range to the modern-day Canadian province of Alberta, after which the genus is named. Scientists disagree on the content of the genus, with some recognizing Gorgosaurus libratus as a second species.
As a tyrannosaurid, Albertosaurus was a bipedal predator with tiny, two-fingered hands and a massive head with dozens of large, sharp teeth. It may have been at the top of the food chain in its local ecosystem. Although relatively large for a theropod, Albertosaurus was much smaller than its more famous relative Tyrannosaurus, probably weighing less than 2 metric tons.
Since the first discovery in 1884, fossils of more than thirty individuals have been recovered, providing scientists with a more detailed knowledge of Albertosaurus anatomy than is available for most other tyrannosaurids. The discovery of 22 individuals at one site provides evidence of pack behavior and allows studies of ontogeny and population biology which are impossible with lesser-known dinosaurs.
Albertosaurus was smaller than the truly gigantic tyrannosaurids like Tarbosaurus and Tyrannosaurus. Typical adults measured up to 9 meters (30 ft) long, while rare individuals of great age could grow to over 10 meters (33 ft) in length. Several independent mass estimates, obtained by different methods, suggest that an adult Albertosaurus weighed between 1.3 tonnes (1.4 short tons)and 1.7 tonnes (1.9 tons).
The massive skull of Albertosaurus, perched on a short, S-shaped neck, was approximately 1 meter (3.3 ft) long in the largest adults. Wide openings in the skull (fenestrae) reduced the weight of the head while also providing space for muscle attachment and sensory organs. Its long jaws contained more than 60 banana-shaped teeth; larger tyrannosaurids possessed fewer teeth. Unlike most theropods, Albertosaurus and other tyrannosaurids were heterodont, with teeth of different forms depending on their position in the mouth. The premaxillary teeth at the tip of the upper jaw were much smaller than the rest, more closely packed, and D-shaped in cross section.
Above the eyes were short bony crests that may have been brightly colored in life and used in courtship to attract a mate.

Restoration
All tyrannosaurids, including Albertosaurus, shared a similar body appearance. Typically for a theropod, Albertosaurus was bipedal and balanced the heavy head and torso with a long tail. However, tyrannosaurid forelimbs were extremely small for their body size and retained only two digits. The hind limbs were long and ended in a four-toed foot. The first digit, called the hallux, was short and only the other three contacted the ground, with the third (middle) digit longer than the rest. Albertosaurus may have been able to reach speeds of 14−21 kilometers per hour (8−13 miles per hour).
Albertosaurus is a member of the theropod family Tyrannosauridae, in the subfamily Albertosaurinae. Its closest relative is the slightly older Gorgosaurus libratus (sometimes called Albertosaurus libratus; see below). These two species are the only described albertosaurines, although other undescribed species may exist. Thomas Holtz found Appalachiosaurus to be an albertosaurine in 2004, but his more recent unpublished work locates it just outside Tyrannosauridae, in agreement with other authors.
The other major subfamily of tyrannosaurids is the Tyrannosaurinae, including Daspletosaurus, Tarbosaurus and Tyrannosaurus. Compared with these robust tyrannosaurines, albertosaurines had slender builds, with proportionately smaller skulls and longer bones of the lower leg (tibia) and feet (metatarsals and phalanges).
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Fabio Pastori's painting favourite by Mike Fredericks(Prehistoric Times publisher:visit the website![link]

acrylic colours with very thin martin brushes
airbrush 4 background

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
(unranked): Tetanurae or Dilophosauridae
Genus: Cryolophosaurus
Hammer & Hickerson, 1994
Species
C. ellioti Hammer & Hickerson, 1994 (type)
Cryolophosaurus (pronounced /ˌkraɪoʊˌlɒfoʊˈsɔrəs/ or /kraɪˌɒləfəˈsɔrəs/, meaning "cold crest lizard") was a large theropod dinosaur, with a bizarre crest on its head that looked like a Spanish comb. Due to the resemblance of this feature to Elvis Presley's pompadour haircut from the 1950s, this dinosaur was at one point informally known as "Elvisaurus".
Cryolophosaurus was excavated from Antarctica's Early Jurassic Hanson Formation (former the upper Falla Formation) by paleontologist Dr. William Hammer in 1991. It is the first carnivorous dinosaur to be discovered in Antarctica and the first dinosaur of any kind from the continent to be officially named.[1] Dating from the Early Jurassic Period, it was originally described as the earliest known tetanuran, though subsequent studies have found that it is probably more closely related to the dilophosaurs.[2]
Cryolophosaurus was about 6 to 8 meters (20 to 26 feet) long, which is significantly smaller than the largest Allosaurus, which reached up to 12 meters (40 feet) in length.
A high, narrow skull was discovered, 65 centimeters (25 inches) long. The peculiar nasal crest runs just over the eyes, where it rises up perpendicular to the skull and fans out. It is furrowed, giving it a comb-like appearance. It is an extension of the skull bones, near the tear ducts, fused on either side to horns which rise from the eye sockets (orbital horns). While other theropods like the Monolophosaurus have crests, they usually run along the skull instead of across it.[3]
[edit]Classification

"Cryolophosaurus is also of significance because it represents the oldest known tetanuran from any continent — it is the only one from the Early Jurassic."
—William R. Hammer
Classification is difficult because the Cryolophosaurus has a mix of primitive and advanced characteristics. The leg bone (femur) has traits of early theropods, while the skull resembles much later species of the clade Tetanurae, like China's Sinraptor and Yangchuanosaurus. Originally, Hammer and colleagues suspected that Cryolophosaurus might be a ceratosaur or even an early abelisaur, with some traits convergent with those of more advanced tetanurans, but ultimately concluded that it was itself the earliest known member of the tetanuran group.[1] While a subsequent study by Hammer (along with Smith and Currie) again recovered Cryolophosaurus as a tetanuran, a later (2007) study by the same authors found that it was more closely related to Dilophosaurus and Dracovenator than to tetanurans.[3][2]
[link]
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Corythosaurus render made for SOL 90 S.L. publishing house.
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Illustration for SOL 90 S.L. publishing house.
Pteranodon longiceps.
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Plateosaurus for SOL 90 publishing house
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