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A view of the Lampwork Workstations showing the ventilation that is required as well as surfaces that are fireproofed.
Step 1 [link]
Step 2 [link]
Step 3 [link]
Step 4 [link]
Step 5 [link]
Step 6 [link]

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Thank You for your interest in Lampworking!

WHAT IS LAMPWORK?


FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS, glass beads have fascinated people in cultures all over the world...


The earliest glass beads were reserved exclusively for royalty, and in medieval Europe, the techniques for working with glass were closely guarded within families. In America, glass beads were exchanged for furs, tobacco and sugar...In Africa, they were traded for slaves, ivory and gold. During the late 13th century, the Venetians went so far as to remove their entire glassmaking industry to the island of Murano, which effectively quarantined their artisans and secured the Venetian dominance of the technology.


Glass is no longer a precious commodity reserved only for the elite, although it does tend to make one feel regal when wearing it...


Glass used for beadmaking is typically sold in rods about 1/4 inch in diameter, although other sizes are also available. Glass rods come in a rainbow of opaque and transparent colors and filigrana rods have cores of opaque encased in clear glass. Dichroic glass, available in rods and narrow strips of sheet glass, has a thin, metallic-looking coating that shimmers when angled toward light.


The first step in making glass beads is to prepare one or more mandrels. Mandrels are stainless steel rods on which beads are constructed. Mandrels are available in various thicknesses,
and the size of the mandrel determines the size of your bead hole. In order to prevent the hot glass from permanently adhering to the metal, you must coat each mandrel with a compound called a bead separator.


The most important tool is a source of heat for melting glass. Many torch types are available and produce a variety of temperatures. An oxygen-propane torch produces a flame that is approximately 1700-1900 degrees farenheit hotter than the flame from a single-fuel torch. This hotter flame allows the glass to melt much quicker and is the method used by most lampworkers.


The glass rods are heated to a molten state with the torch and then wound onto the mandrels. The hot glass is then decorated using a variety of techniques. Some beads are decorated with dots, swirls, feathers, melted dots, twists, etc.


Once the bead has been formed, it is then put into a kiln to remove internal stresses and prevents fracture or breakage. Beads are kilned overnight and slowly cooled to preserve their beauty forever.

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Please feel free to Message me if you should have questions on my craft and visit my DA page [link] to view samples of my work.

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Proud Daily Deviation of August 12th, 2008

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Namaste,

Ti :heart: :frog:

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Photo courtesy of Glasshopper Studios, St. Louis Missouri [link] where I received my instruction.
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Actual size of my Froggie beads!

Thank You very much for your interest!

If you are interested in learning this ancient art, try a Google search and include your City and State along with the key words lampworking and instruction.

Have fun!
Step 1 [link]
Step 2 [link]
Step 3 [link]
Step 4 [link]
Step 5 [link]
Step 6 [link]

----

Thank You for your interest in Lampworking!

WHAT IS LAMPWORK?


FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS, glass beads have fascinated people in cultures all over the world...


The earliest glass beads were reserved exclusively for royalty, and in medieval Europe, the techniques for working with glass were closely guarded within families. In America, glass beads were exchanged for furs, tobacco and sugar...In Africa, they were traded for slaves, ivory and gold. During the late 13th century, the Venetians went so far as to remove their entire glassmaking industry to the island of Murano, which effectively quarantined their artisans and secured the Venetian dominance of the technology.


Glass is no longer a precious commodity reserved only for the elite, although it does tend to make one feel regal when wearing it...


Glass used for beadmaking is typically sold in rods about 1/4 inch in diameter, although other sizes are also available. Glass rods come in a rainbow of opaque and transparent colors and filigrana rods have cores of opaque encased in clear glass. Dichroic glass, available in rods and narrow strips of sheet glass, has a thin, metallic-looking coating that shimmers when angled toward light.


The first step in making glass beads is to prepare one or more mandrels. Mandrels are stainless steel rods on which beads are constructed. Mandrels are available in various thicknesses,
and the size of the mandrel determines the size of your bead hole. In order to prevent the hot glass from permanently adhering to the metal, you must coat each mandrel with a compound called a bead separator.


The most important tool is a source of heat for melting glass. Many torch types are available and produce a variety of temperatures. An oxygen-propane torch produces a flame that is approximately 1700-1900 degrees farenheit hotter than the flame from a single-fuel torch. This hotter flame allows the glass to melt much quicker and is the method used by most lampworkers.


The glass rods are heated to a molten state with the torch and then wound onto the mandrels. The hot glass is then decorated using a variety of techniques. Some beads are decorated with dots, swirls, feathers, melted dots, twists, etc.


Once the bead has been formed, it is then put into a kiln to remove internal stresses and prevents fracture or breakage. Beads are kilned overnight and slowly cooled to preserve their beauty forever.

----

Please feel free to Message me if you should have questions on my craft and visit my DA page [link] to view samples of my work.

----

Proud Daily Deviation of August 12th, 2008

----

Namaste,

Ti :heart: :frog:

----

Photo courtesy of Glasshopper Studios, St. Louis Missouri [link] where I received my instruction.
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Briolettes and bead clusters are one of the most basic elements we incorporate into our jewelry. In this lesson I will teach you two simple ways to wrap a briolette, and how to wrap beads for bead clusters.

This is being given, free of charge, as a companion to a tutorial I have coming out in a couple of days for this piece:

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EDIT: Was supposed to be lamé for the title, but apparently, the é was not acceptable... go figure. So, you're stuck with the title of "LAME trim".

~

Okay, here is another one of those "hey, I'm doing this right now, I wonder if anyone is interested in this being a tutorial? I mind-as-well take pictures just in case it helps."

Working with lamé trim can be a pain, but not impossible. Just remember, the larger the size of the piece you're working with (i.e. trim versus a skirt), the more wrinkled it will get, and the easier it will be to screw it up.

I personally don't like lamé except under certain circumstances - I love it as trim, so long as it behaves. There are many other alternatives out there, though, so I suggest that if lamé is giving you a hard time, look around and see what else there is that is shiny :D

...

I still think I get too wordy with tutorials, but ah well. You'll have to deal with it ;P

:star: Please forgive the horrible, horrible drawings, too. I can't help it - I only have a touch-pad to draw with at the moment, and there is so very little you can do with them...
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Tutorial por: *Glori305
Original: [link]

Traducido por: =JacquiJax
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Sorry if this doesn't help anybody, but I figured (as per the usual) that if it's something new to me, it might help someone else out a bit. So here is the mini tutorial on steaming wrinkles out of vinyl.

This tutorial is done with a garment steamer - I don't know how well this would work with an iron (if it even would) but if someone wants to give it a try with some scrap fabric, let me know the results please! Otherwise, I'll try it out some more the next time I'm working on a commission dealing with vinyl.

I'll have a couple more mini vinyl tutorials when I work on my next Shuichi commission, so hopefully that will help make a scary fabric to work with a little less scary :D

As per the usual, please don't say this is yours, or redistribute it without asking first. Please link people to this deviation instead :D
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OK, it's proving easier for me just to upload the latest draft as opposed to doing it in sections. So here's the latest draft which now includes chapters 1-6 (which also includes a pretty cool project!)

Spelling errors have not yet been adjusted, sorry.

Another update will follow shortly which will include slightly more advanced techniques, including how to make rings from wire without soldering. More advanced techniques will follow in later updates. I'm doing this in my spare time when I'm not at work, so it's taking a little longer than I would have liked. I'll move each old draft into scraps when I upload each new draft. Once I get the final draft done, I'll submit that to the group.
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"Panda Charm Tutorial" by =Oborochann

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"Bowl of Ice cream tutorial" by ~chatnoir

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"Sushi Cane Tutorial" by ~chatnoir

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