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These Breeches are made of fairly heavey brown linen and lined in parts with various linens. I drafted the pattern myself.* Adn yes, that's me wearing them. I'll be the first to tell you that breeches look rediculous on a girl, they just wern't made for hips, but I'll still pretty pound of these.

The style is that of the later half of the 18th century with a fall front. They are *supposed* to come to just below the knee and be tight to the leg. thses aren't quite tight enough if you ask me, but they are comfortable enough.

The bottoms are fastened with brass repro buckles (the most expensive part of the breeches at $25 ) and all the buttons are hand made covered buttons made of self-fabric.

These breeches have three pockets, two at the sides and a watch pocket worked into the waistband. At the back the breeches lace through four eyelets to allow for ajustablity. this does mean that they have to be worn with an long 18th century shirt though, otherwise they show a bit too much...


*Ok so I think this is pretty cool, I layed out my capris pattern and then shapped and changed it a bit untill it looked like the pictures of breeches patterns in Costume Close-up. Then I did a fitting muslin and voila!
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Rose linen 1770's linen Robe a l'anglaise worn polenaise style over shift, stays, bum roll and three petticoats with accesories.

I started work on the pattern for the gown the day after christmas and have finished it on the 13th of january. I put somewhere between 25 and 50 hours into it not counting research. It is entirely hand sewn in linen thread and I have attemped to use period construction techniques. It closes in front by means of pins. The back bodice and skirt are a continuous piece of fabric as can be seen in the back shots.

My main sources of information for this were:
Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion
Linda Baumgarten's Costume Close-up
Sharron Ann Burnston's Fitting and Proper
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Waistcoat, breeches and linen shirt for the 18th century.

The patterns are cut from original French 18th century patterns that I have drafted and sized up.

The waiscoat, also called a vest, can be made with or without sleeves. The back is split and laced to allow for fitting adjustments. This pattern only showed four buttons at the centre front and one at the neck a ruffle on the shirt or stock would hide both any buttons and the shirt opening. This cut is almost identical to the waiscoat worn by Orlando Bloom in Pirates of the Carribbean - Curse of the Black Pearl. The main differences being his waistcoat buttons all the way up the front and his is not made of fancy stuff. ;) Although lined with linen, the fabric I have used for the waiscoat is modern furnishing fabrc that is remeniscent of the fabrics of the 18th century.

The breeches are made of wool and fully lined in linen. The fly is closed with buttons and there are eyelets and lacing in the waistband at the back to allow for waist adjustment.

The leg opens at the knee with buttons and a garter with a buckle finishes off the closure. Check the [link] for details.

The buttons on the waistcoat and breeches andthe knee buckle are cast pewter. The buttons are inspired by some original carved bone buttons, the buckle is a copy of an original buckle.

The shirt is a fine linen shirt, the cuffs are closed with shirt buttons the front should be closed with a tie or a neck stock (like a cravat) that would cover the opening at the front. The shirt is constructed from rectangles and squares, none of the panels are shaped, axtra room is allowed in the underarm and at the neck by inserting squares of fabric.
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Another shot of the 18th century striped grey wool polonaise dress.
Same as this dress.

Photo: Susanne Pettersson
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18th Century Gentleman and 18th Century riding habit

Costumes, hats and props made by me
Photo by Jack Herzberg

REMEMBER TO LIKE ME ON FACEBOOK!: [link]
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Hand made goatskin dance slippers based off of pairs in the Met's and MFA's collections (the pair at the met is viewable online here: [link])

They have one inch wooden heels, are straight lasted (no left and right) and leather soles.

As always, I regret that these are not more perfect. There were some issues with coloring the leather, and as you can see, there are some wrinkles in the final fit. But then again, this is my third pair of shoes ever.
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18th century dress with polonaise. Itīs based on RH822 (slightly changed and without the anglais-pleating in the back).

The dress is made from a grey/black striped wool, the petticoat is made from a thin grey wool.

Itīs worn over these stays

Here is another photo of this dress.
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18th century polonaise dress of burgundy wool, the petticoat is black wool.

side/back wiev

Worn over the black stays and a white linen chemise.

The lovely mini tricorne was made by [link]
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This is an 18th Century Jacket and Hat I threw together in a couple of weeks for Pirate Fest.

This was totally an unplanned project! We have Ren Faire and then Pirate Fest every year here, but I've never devoted any time to make historical costumes for it, mostly because I've never found proper shoes. I actually bought 1 yard of fabric with the intention of just making a new crappy ren faire bodice, but that bothered me and it morphed into a crazy 2-week project. I had bought historical replica shoes (from american-duchess.com) and had them dyed yellow to match both a Padme costume and a petticoat from my first 18th century project.

The jacket I have to say is based on historical lines but I can't vouch for it's accuracy. Since I threw this together in a couple weeks, I simply took the pattern I made for my first dress bodice and altered it, refering to general jacket lines in my source materials. I have a corset, but it is fully boned in metal and I can't drive in that, so I added some boning to this bodice to replicate the look. Behind the stomacher are laces for strength, and the stomacher closes by hook-and-eyes, the buttons beind only decorative. The fabric is from JoAnn's home dec section, and is lined in black linen. The flounces I decided to add at 1 in the morning the night before the event, I simply took cotton lawn and did a scallop stitch on my machine.

The hat is one I bought last year at faire, I box-pleated yellow ribbon to go with the petticoat hem, and put a black velvet ribbon around it to tie in with the bodice color. The flowers are from Michael's craft store and I have no clue what type of flowers they are suppose to be other than the black rose.
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Here is an 18th century French-style peasant costume. The shift underneath is handmade, but I was lazy and used my machine for the apron, petticoat and cap.
NOTA: PLEASE IGNORE THE ASIAN-PRINT CORSET!!! I have not yet had the time to make the corset that goes with this outfit. Please don't even comment on it, cause I know. I will be starting that soon. Aaaand I will also be making a blue skirt cause I'm not liking the sage-colored one that much. It blends in too much with the apron.

So, breakdown:
~ white broadcloth: $3.99/m = $8-ish
~ two striped pillowcases: $1.98
~ a queen-sized flat bedsheet: $7

Behleeedaht. Seriously.

:icondonotplz::iconusemyartplz:
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