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Inspired by a scene from Tokyo drift, created in 3ds Max from my models, rendered in mental ray and edited in photoshop.
3 Differences Fan Art
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This model is a courtesy of Laffont. See is fantastic gallery here: laffonte.deviantart.com/

The Ford GT40 is a high performance American-British endurance racing car, built and designed in England (Mk I, Mk II, and Mk III) and in the United States (Mk IV) respectively, and powered by a series of American-built engines, which won the 24 Hours of Le Mans four consecutive times, from 1966 to 1969 (1966 being the Mk II, 1967 the Mk IV, and 1968-1969 the oldest chassis design, the Mk I). In 1966, at the attendance of Henry Ford II himself in Le Mans, the Mk II GT40 provided Ford with the first overall Le Mans victory for an American manufacturer and the first victory for an American manufacturer at a major European race since Jimmy Murphy´s triumph with Duesenberg at the 1921 French Grand Prix. The Mk IV GT40, which won the race in 1967, remains, to this day, the only car designed and built entirely in the United States to claim an overall win at Le Mans.

In addition to four consecutive overall Le Mans victories, Ford also won the following four FIA international titles (at what was then unofficially known as the World Sportscar Championship) with the GT40


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Text from:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_GT4…
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Shelby Series 1 was a high-performance roadster designed by Carroll Shelby and produced by Shelby American.

It was powered by Oldsmobile's 4.0 L L47 Aurora V8 DOHC engine. It has 320 hp (324 PS) at 6500 rpm, 290 lb·ft (390 N·m) at 5000 rpm and will do 0-60 mph (0–96 km/h) in 4.4 seconds and records 12.8 seconds in the quarter mile at 112 mph (180 km/h). Top speed is 170 mph (273.5 km/h) (15 mph (24 km/h) faster than the 427 Shelby Cobra). The 1998 car weighed 1,202 kg (2,650 lb).

The Series 1 is the only car ever designed and engineered by Carroll Shelby from a clean sheet of paper, and built from the ground up. All other Shelbys are re-engineered models produced by other manufacturers and modified by Shelby.

Prior to production of the Series 1, significant costs were incurred in testing and certification required to conform to 1999 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. Once completed, a total of 249 production Series 1 were constructed by Shelby American, Inc., all as 1999 models.

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The car model was a conversion from a game "Forza Motorsport 3"
all of the textures are failure in conversion.. so I arranged the paint and the materials by self.

Created in 3Ds MAX 2011
Achieved with mental ray
Edited in Photoshop

:icondonotuseplz::iconmyartplz:
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The Morgan Aero 8 is a sports car designed and built by Morgan Motor Company at its factory in Malvern Link, England (an area of Malvern in Worcestershire).

The Aero 8 is notable for several reasons, primarily because it is the first new Morgan design since 1948. It does not use anti-roll bars, an oddity in a modern sporting car. It is also the first Morgan vehicle with an aluminum chassis and frame as opposed to traditional Morgan vehicles ("trads") that have an aluminium skinned wooden body tub on a steel chassis.

The engine first powering the Aero 8 was a 4400 cc V8 built by BMW mated to a 6-Speed Getrag transmission. In 2008, the Aero 8 will have the 4.8 BMW engine with an optional automatic transmission. All Aero 8s are assembled at Morgan's Malvern Link factory, where they are able to produce up to 14 cars a week (Aeros and trads).

It has been criticized for its "crosseyed" look which originally was justified by the manufacturers as conferring aerodynamic benefits.In response, Morgan changed the design for 2007 and later cars to a front end design based on the Morgan Aeromax, using Mini rather than VW New Beetle headlights.

Text from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morgan_A…

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The Nissan R390 GT1 was a mid-engined racing car built in Atsugi, Japan. It was designed primarily for the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1997 and 1998. It was built to race under the grand tourer style rules, requiring a homologated road version to be built, although only 2 R390 road cars were ever built. One was sold through a private auction, without any record, and the other one is stored at Nissan's Zama facility. The R390 Road Car was one of the first and fastest Japanese supercars, prior to the new Nissan R35 GT-R

Only 2 known R390 road cars were ever built, and one is stored at Nissan's Zama warehouse. The other was sold to a wealthy car enthusiast by auction. The street-legal road car is capable of running 0-60 mph in 3.3 seconds and 0-100 mph in just 6.8 seconds. The 1/4 mile is accomplished in just 11.1 seconds at 134 mph (216 km/h). The top speed is 350 km/h (220 mph).

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The car model was a conversion from a game "Forza Motorsport 3"
all of the textures are failure in conversion.. so I arranged the paint and the materials by self.

Created in 3Ds MAX 2011
Achieved with mental ray
Edited in Photoshop
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Chevrolet Camaro
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The Maserati 300S was a racing car produced by Maserati of Italy between 1955–58, which competed in the FIA's World Sportscar Championship. Twenty eight examples were produced.

The 3.0-litre (approx 245 bhp (183 kW) at 6200 rpm) engine was based on the Straight-6 design of the Maserati 250F and incorporated a lengthened stroke developed by Vittorio Bellentani to increase the capacity from the original 2.5-litres. The compression ratio was reduced from 12:1 to 9.5:1, partly due to the FIA regulations requiring the engine to be run on road car fuel. It used three Weber carburettors, initially 42DCO3, later 45DCO3. A trellis structure was used instead of the tubular one of the 250F, and the aluminium body was by Medardo Fantuzzi. The brakes were the same as the 250F, beautifully machined alloy drums with extensive fining. The suspension was also of the same design as the 250F but with some strengthening to cope with the rougher tracks and road surfaces encountered in WSC racing. New features for the 300S included the incorporation of a DeDion type rear axle, a transverse four speed gearbox and two chain driven camshafts.

After a poor showing in the first season (1955) due mainly to mechanical malfunctions and development problems, it won at the Nurburgring in 1956 and finished second overall. It was second to the Maserati 450S, and was followed by the Maserati 350S. After the Guidizzolo accident (1957), the last few 300S were sold to customers in the USA. Giulio Alfieri gave up an attempt to fit it with fuel injection. One 300S was developed with the new V12 engine, becoming the Maserati 350S.

Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits fame is a long term owner of a 300S and has regularly raced the car in historic competitions.

Text link: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maserati…

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Lotus Exige V6
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You don't have to go too far back into history to find this controversial machine, spawned from a great idea, but resulted in the destruction of the car industry in Northern Ireland and the near imprisonment of the company's founder John DeLorean.

John DeLorean (1925 - 2005) was a very talented car designer at the General Motors Corporation, designing many classics such as the Pontiac GTO and the Chevy Vega.Unsatisfied with his maverick way of business he was eventually let go from GMC in 1973, despite being the Vice-President.

But this was not the end of his story as he chose instead to create an ethical utopian sports car that wasn't built with the planned obsolescence that the big Detroit businesses were building their cars. With that, he formed the DeLorean Motor Company, affectionately dubbed DMC.

Originally his plan was to open a factory in Puerto Rico, but eventually settled in Northern Ireland after £100 million was offered by the Northern Ireland Development Agency, who also made a deal that it would be funded by the British Government at a rate of which every £100 paid into the company by the taxpayer, DeLorean only had to repay £1. In 16 months a 660,000 ft² factory had been built in the Dunmurry suburb of Belfast.

At the same time he began to design the company's first (and what would turn out to be only) product the DMC-12. Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, the car was meant to look like a machine that was not of this world, or had accidentally be sent back in time by some fuddy duddy in the future (I'll get round to that later). With Gullwing doors, a stainless steel body and top of the range safety features including airbags and a crash-resistant plastic understructure.

However, beneath the futuristic body the car was very primitive. DeLorean had signed a deal with Lotus to help him develop the car, but this would ultimately result in the car being more a Lotus Esprit with a different body.

The promised rigidity of the car during crashes using ERM (Elastic Reservoir Moulding) was replaced by a conventional chassis and resin. Eventually even Airbags weren't included in the final model.

In a panic to get the cars into production in 2 years rather than the recommended 5, hastily put together durability tests were carried out by driving the cars round and round a racetrack constantly until bits fell off.

The built quality too was very much shambolic to say the least. The iconic Gullwing doors were given struts that were too weak and therefore never worked properly, resulting in them not fully opening.

The engine was not sterling and new, but instead was an age old 2.6L Renault V6 from a Renault 30, producing only a measly 130bhp resulting in the car being heavily underpowered.

The suspension had to be modified with springs, the driving experience was claustrophobic and dark, the alternator was too weak for the electronics and thus went flat in no time, often with the result of locking the occupants inside due to the electric central locking system, the stainless steel body was easily stained even by fingerprints, it had panel gaps that you could drive a bus through, the car handled like soap and was supposed to cost $12,000 but ended up entering sales at £26,000, which made it impossible to compete with similar Porsche's and Merc's of that price range which were also much, much better.

But either way the car went on sale in 1981 to a huge fan-fare, with the car outselling Porsche and having deposits backing up at showrooms across America.

However, the honeymoon soon wore off and by 1982 only 4,500 of the proposed 10,000 cars per year were sold. In fact eventually only 8,000 cars would be built, meaning DeLorean had failed to reach this target on both accounts.

But DeLorean continued to be ambitious and floated the company on the stock market, upping production at the factory to make things look busy and putting raw recruits straight onto the shop floor. The result was that Belfast's workforce were churning out thousands of cars no one wanted and thus were losing a fortune.

Eventually he turned to the British Government for some extra money, but the new government under Mrs. Thatcher was no longer willing to give subsidies following their confrontations with British Leyland.

The end came when DeLorean was arrested by the FBI for brokering Cocaine deals to help fund the company. Although acquitted on the grounds of entrapment, the company went bust in 1983 and the 2,600 Belfast workers, who despite working to the very end to keep on making cars, were turned away, with the remaining cars and equipment being auctioned off for what little money they could salvage.

Of the £800 million put into the company by the American and British governments, the resulting accounting recalculations found that only about £100,000 of that could be reclaimed, with another $17 million disappearing without trace.

But the DMC-12 went on to find a celebrity future as its space-age looks made it the perfect Time-Machine for the fantastic Back to the Future trilogy. But that is very much the thing that made the DMC-12 win in the end, the fact that even today seeing one parked on the street, people cannot help but stop and stare in fascination. Although not everyone knows about the trouble that surrounded this car's short construction life, it is what most people recognize it by, a pure mixture of style and scandal, a car with a criminal past...
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You don't have to go too far back into history to find this controversial machine, spawned from a great idea, but resulted in the destruction of the car industry in Northern Ireland and the near imprisonment of the company's founder John DeLorean.

John DeLorean (1925 - 2005) was a very talented car designer at the General Motors Corporation, designing many classics such as the Pontiac GTO and the Chevy Vega.Unsatisfied with his maverick way of business he was eventually let go from GMC in 1973, despite being the Vice-President.

But this was not the end of his story as he chose instead to create an ethical utopian sports car that wasn't built with the planned obsolescence that the big Detroit businesses were building their cars. With that, he formed the DeLorean Motor Company, affectionately dubbed DMC.

Originally his plan was to open a factory in Puerto Rico, but eventually settled in Northern Ireland after £100 million was offered by the Northern Ireland Development Agency, who also made a deal that it would be funded by the British Government at a rate of which every £100 paid into the company by the taxpayer, DeLorean only had to repay £1. In 16 months a 660,000 ft² factory had been built in the Dunmurry suburb of Belfast.

At the same time he began to design the company's first (and what would turn out to be only) product the DMC-12. Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, the car was meant to look like a machine that was not of this world, or had accidentally be sent back in time by some fuddy duddy in the future (I'll get round to that later). With Gullwing doors, a stainless steel body and top of the range safety features including airbags and a crash-resistant plastic understructure.

However, beneath the futuristic body the car was very primitive. DeLorean had signed a deal with Lotus to help him develop the car, but this would ultimately result in the car being more a Lotus Esprit with a different body.

The promised rigidity of the car during crashes using ERM (Elastic Reservoir Moulding) was replaced by a conventional chassis and resin. Eventually even Airbags weren't included in the final model.

In a panic to get the cars into production in 2 years rather than the recommended 5, hastily put together durability tests were carried out by driving the cars round and round a racetrack constantly until bits fell off.

The built quality too was very much shambolic to say the least. The iconic Gullwing doors were given struts that were too weak and therefore never worked properly, resulting in them not fully opening.

The engine was not sterling and new, but instead was an age old 2.6L Renault V6 from a Renault 30, producing only a measly 130bhp resulting in the car being heavily underpowered.

The suspension had to be modified with springs, the driving experience was claustrophobic and dark, the alternator was too weak for the electronics and thus went flat in no time, often with the result of locking the occupants inside due to the electric central locking system, the stainless steel body was easily stained even by fingerprints, it had panel gaps that you could drive a bus through, the car handled like soap and was supposed to cost $12,000 but ended up entering sales at £26,000, which made it impossible to compete with similar Porsche's and Merc's of that price range which were also much, much better.

But either way the car went on sale in 1981 to a huge fan-fare, with the car outselling Porsche and having deposits backing up at showrooms across America.

However, the honeymoon soon wore off and by 1982 only 4,500 of the proposed 10,000 cars per year were sold. In fact eventually only 8,000 cars would be built, meaning DeLorean had failed to reach this target on both accounts.

But DeLorean continued to be ambitious and floated the company on the stock market, upping production at the factory to make things look busy and putting raw recruits straight onto the shop floor. The result was that Belfast's workforce were churning out thousands of cars no one wanted and thus were losing a fortune.

Eventually he turned to the British Government for some extra money, but the new government under Mrs. Thatcher was no longer willing to give subsidies following their confrontations with British Leyland.

The end came when DeLorean was arrested by the FBI for brokering Cocaine deals to help fund the company. Although acquitted on the grounds of entrapment, the company went bust in 1983 and the 2,600 Belfast workers, who despite working to the very end to keep on making cars, were turned away, with the remaining cars and equipment being auctioned off for what little money they could salvage.

Of the £800 million put into the company by the American and British governments, the resulting accounting recalculations found that only about £100,000 of that could be reclaimed, with another $17 million disappearing without trace.

But the DMC-12 went on to find a celebrity future as its space-age looks made it the perfect Time-Machine for the fantastic Back to the Future trilogy. But that is very much the thing that made the DMC-12 win in the end, the fact that even today seeing one parked on the street, people cannot help but stop and stare in fascination. Although not everyone knows about the trouble that surrounded this car's short construction life, it is what most people recognize it by, a pure mixture of style and scandal, a car with a criminal past...
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