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The Electorate of Saxony (German: Kurfürstentum Sachsen) was a state of the Holy Roman Empire. It originated from the Ascanian duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg, but was granted electoral dignity through the Golden Bull of 1356. Following the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, the electorate became a kingdom and remained so until the defeat of the German Empire in 1918.

The Saxon coat of arms displays a nine fold partitioned field of black and gold stripes, charged with a green common rue running diagonally across the field. The design may be derived from that used by the Saxon counts of Ballenstedt and dates back to at least the eleventh century, making it one of the oldest coats or arms still in use.

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The German Empire (German: Deutsches Reich) emerged from the Prussian victory in the Franco-Prussian War (1870 − 1871) and the subsequent proclamation of a united German state (excluding the Austrians) under Prussian leadership. The empire rapidly rose to the status of a great power: by 1913, it boasted one of the most urbanised societies in the world, one of the strongest and most innovative industrial bases, one of the largest armies and navies and key accomplishments in the fields of industry, technology and science. The empire nevertheless collapsed in World War I and was turned into a republic by the victorious Allies. On top of defeat and the dissolution of their empire, the 1919 Treaty of Versailles blamed the war responsibility on the Germans and imposed severe territorial concessions and reparation payments.

The flag of the German Empire was a horizontal tricolour of black-white-red, combining the red-white colours of the medieval Hanseatic League with the black-white of Prussia. The design had already been used by the Prussian-led North German Confederation (1867 – 1871) before being officially adopted as flag of the German Empire in 1892.

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As the title say - just some random stuff I did. No timeline, just a coat of arms.
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The Holy Roman Empire (Latin: Sacrum Imperium Romanum, German: Heiliges Römisches Reich, Dutch: Heilige Roomse Rijk, Italian: Sacro Romano Impero, Czech: Svatá říše římská, Slovene: Sveto rimsko cesarstvo, French: Saint-Empire romain germanique) was a vast conglomerate of states across Central Europe which was proclaimed at the imperial coronation of Otto I in 962. It lasted for almost a millennium, until its dissolution by Emperor Francis II in August 1806, following the defeat of Habsburg Austria by Napoleon Bonaparte. The empire was known simply as the ‘Roman Empire’ until the reign of Frederick I Barbarossa (r. 1155 – 1190), who called it ‘Holy’ to signify his self-proclaimed authority over the Papacy. A 1512 decree of the Imperial Diet formally declared ‘Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation’ to be the official name.

The Holy Roman Empire had no official national flag but rather an imperial banner associated with the person of the Holy Roman Emperor. From around 1430, the banner’s basic design was a gold field with a black double-headed eagle in the centre, sometimes adorned with haloes and the escutcheon of the reigning Emperor.

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The Cross of Burgundy (Spanish: Cruz de Borgoña) flag was used most prominently by Spain as a naval flag until 1701 and land battle flag until 1843. It is inspired on the Cross of Saint Andrew and was used on the standards of King Philip I the Handsome as early as 1506, following his marriage to Joanna of Castile. The dukes of Burgundy allegedly used the cross during the Hundred Years’ War (1337 – 1453).

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What if the United States had been a monarchy instead of a republic? The concept is not completely outlandish. After all monarchy was the default form of government back when the United States seceded from British rule. There was also plans to offer the Prussian prince Henry the throne.

Had the continental congress elected a king the title is not unlikely to have been changed to emperor, once the nation grew westwards.

This is how a coat of arms of an American Empire could have looked like.
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Charlemagne, the founder of the Holy Roman Empire, was crowned "Emperor of the Romans" in Christmas of 800 AD by Pope Leo III.

So we have two "Emperors of the Romans" coexisting in the Medieval Europe. The Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire and the Emperor of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire.

Summarizing we can see a German and a Greek king calling themselves Romans only to gain the imperial inheritance of the Roman Empire.
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An alternate history scenario featuring a German victory in the First World War. I'm not sure about the exact story behind it and I can't detail a point of divergence, but I have a vague idea of the situation. Austria-Hungary collapsed at the end of the war and Germany annexed Austria and the Czech lands (the latter forming an autonomous Czech Republic consisting of the provinces of Bohemia and Moravia with the capital in Prague). The Habsburgs still rule the (mostly) intact Kingdom of Hungary and Croatia (with Dalmatia and Bosnia), while Galicia has gone to a revived Kingdom of Poland and Bukovina (along with Bessarabia) to Romania.

Germany has also annexed Luxemburg, Lichtenstein, and a slice of German-speaking Hungary equivalent to the Burgenland, including Ödenburg. To avoid further French revanchism and as a symbol of good faith, Germany has generally left western Europe alone, avoiding the annexation of any Belgian (perhaps Germany didn't even invade through Belgium, leaving Britain neutral or even allied to the Reich) or French territories, though it has revised the border with Switzerland, annexing most of the canton of Schaffhausen surrounding Büsingen.
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This is the eastern view of the cathedral in Trier (modern Germany). In the times of the Roman Empire the city of Trier was one of the largest Roman cities in northern Europe.  At the height of its glory, around 3rd C. it is said to have been inhabited by around 70 000 people. It was an imperial residence surrounded by walls of which the famous ‘Black gate’, the largest antique fortified gate in the world, survives to this day and had numerous monumental public buildings like baths or amphitheater. The city also preserves a rich collection of Roman mosaics, sculpture and murals which can compete with those recovered from the large cities of the Roman Mediterranean. Despite being located close to the border with Germania from where the Huns and Germanic tribes often attacked Roman borders, Trier was sufficiently large and resilient that it survived the collapse of the Roman Empire and preserved its role as an important civic centre throughout the medieval period until the modern times. Regardless of the withdrawal of the Roman legions, the succession of the bishops and later archbishops of Trier goes from Eucharius, Valerius and Maternus in the late 3rd and early 4th C. through Modetus and Maximianus in the 7th C. to powerful medieval archbishops like Bohemond von Warsberg from the late 13th C. The cathedral of Trier, though damaged numerous times for example by Huns or the Vikings in the 9th C. preserves substantial parts dating from Roman and late Antique period. In the times when urban life collapsed in northern Europe, the city of Trier continued to function under the rule of Latin clergy and maintained links with the major urban centers of the Mediterranean. This surviving Roman city witnessed the rebirth of urbanism in the northern Europe and became one of the most important cities in the medieval Holy Roman Empire.

The parts of the cathedral visible on the photograph date mainly from the 11th C. though the upper part of the right tower is obviously later – note its gothic windows, much different the earlier Romanesque ones.  

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Decided to completly redo the whole thing in the style of the Holy Roman Emperors.

This is the personal coat of arms of His Imperial Majesty, Karl Anton I., Emperor of the Germans.

The double-headed eagle bears the shield of his house, the House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. The order ist the (fictional) Imperial Order of the Golden Eagle, founded by Karl Anton I. in October 1851, since then highest ranking military and civil decoration of the Greater German Empire. It is awarded only by his Imperial Majeyty the Emperor himself and therefor autonomous from citizenship of one of the Empire's member states, wich makes it unique among German decorations, as all member states retain their own military and civil decorations.

It may not look like it, but this took a ton of work to create and will most likely be the last work of this extent I will be able to do for some time, as I just started university and that will from now on eat most of my time. I will still try to upload content on a more or less regular basis, at least I hope to. If not you may stone and quarter me.

Credits: Elements taken from wikimedia commons.
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