Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Similar Deviations
These results appear less relevant than we'd like. While we're working on improving More Like This, you can help by collecting "Lexi Bloom" with similar deviations.
Based on John Taylor's original artwork.
B pencil.
Size : 24x32cm.
Made in september 2011.
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

... as a a beautiful fit woman :
this is the fourth drawing concerning the list of the poll I did in last May  (see my journal : poll 'One of my future drawings ...')
HB/2B/4B pencils.
Size : 30x30.
Made in august 2014.
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Captain Stone Is Missing

Wed Feb 11, 2015, 6:44 PM
97-img-00 by techgnotic














A Madefire motion book by Christina McCormack & Liam Sharp


Without going into all the wonderful enhancements (not only frame motion and dramatic juxtapositions, but also musical scoring and sound and flash effects) possible with the Madefire motion books process, it should be emphasized lest one get lost in all the bells and whistles that the actual story narrative of Captain Stone is Missing is stand–alone worthy of feature film treatment (and every other possible iteration). This is the second “Madefire motion book” produced by Wolstonholme and Sharp to receive this highest assessment, the first being Mono. Both titles represent achievements a cut above standard comic book fare. In each, the storytelling is genuinely literary rather than stalely clichéd, even before the addition of “motion book” technology is factored in. Liam Sharp’s masterful artwork alone would be reason enough to celebrate “Stone,” even if nothing “moved.”



The first grand conceit of the “Stone” series is that there is no Marvel nor DC Universe.


Captain Stone is this world’s sole “superhero,” and he is a cartoonishly muscle–bound, classically–costumed force–for–good. He and his “Stone Corps” team debut in the aftermath of real world disasters like the Manila earthquake, distributing medicine and food and providing protection to the devastated population. Stone and his Corps render aid at other natural disasters. Then this hero turns vigilante, bringing international drug lords and other “untouchable” criminals to justice. He is admired by both liberals and conservatives for getting results. He becomes a pop hero with comics, novels, movies and an animated series on TV. But he doesn’t thwart 9/11 or capture Bin Laden. He does capture Hussein as part of his support for the Iraq war. But the absence of WMD makes him look misguided and foolish. The moonlighting CIA agents who make up his Stone Corps leak that his immense wealth is running out. There are rumors of illicit means securing further funding of his operations. His image already tarnished, the bombshell revelation that he is “Flint Clayton,” son of a despised and recently deceased media mogul billionaire, tanks what was left of his popularity. A disastrous appearance, unmasked, on a cable news interview show, effectively “ends” the hero Captain Stone. Reality TV shows, allegations of ‘roid rage and a sex tape mark Stone’s descent from Captain Stone to Fred Flint–Stone. Stone’s secret North Carolina Appalachian mountain HQ blows up. It is not known whether he is dead or alive. Captain Stone is missing. So ends the wild witty preamble that is “Book One.”


The constant interpolation of current pop memes that suffuses the narrative sets up a brilliantly “knowing” rise, fall and redemption tale well–resonating with today’s Internet readership. No comic (non–underground) has ever dared to be quite this hip and political before.



Charlotte “Charlie” Chance (aka “The Pet”) is the other half of the Stone story.


She is the daughter of Lord Charles Chance, delightfully 60s–style millionaire playboy and international Robin Hoodish jewel thief. From age 6 to 12, Charlie accompanies him on heists. Then, during a robbery, the Craven Panther is forced to kill a guard dog about to attack her. She is psychologically traumatized, quitting the “family business,” and becoming a vegetarian and a PETA activist. In her work with PETA she uncovers the plot of a group of meat suppliers to introduce a hormone into the population through their product that will addict them to red meat. The evildoers go to prison. But Charlie is paid back with an ambush injection in the leg. She suspects she has been given the AIDS virus. Instead, the injected bug, courtesy of the meat–men, turns her into a sort of vampire, ravenous for human blood. It gets worse for her. Clayton’s widow calls up to reveal that Charlie and Captain Stone are half–brother and half–sister. Even as cable news helicopters circle the smoking remains of Stone’s mountain HQ, covering the big news story “du jour” on Charlie’s TV screen, she learns that Stone is the “love child” of a one night stand between mogul Clayton’s trophy wife (and now widow) and Charlie’s Craven Panther jewel thief father (retired).


Despite the impediment of her bloodlust addiction, Charlie decides she needs to join the search for her missing half–brother, Captain Stone, regardless of whether he’s dead or alive. So begins “Book Two.”


It’s amazing that a digital comic, presented as a prototype showing off the possibilities of a revolutionary new system like Madefire motion books, and having what one would assume to be profitability as a part of its business plan, would go so far out of its way to have fun with and, to a great extent, subvert the current popular mainstream of superhero characters in comics, on TV and in the movie theaters. But Captain Stone does not offend pop superhero fans’ sensibilities. Instead, the storytelling, being so elevated and engaging above the common bar, makes it representative of the next level of its genre’s future, rather than being perceived as a mocking wrecking–ball. This is quite a feat, given the rabid loyalties of comics fans, especially of the superhero genre.


Captain Stone is indicative of a new creative positive growth in comic storytelling, pushing back against the naysaying trolls harping on a supposed creeping atrophy.



















Your Thoughts


  1. Do you prefer a wholly–imagined different world — the better to help you escape in some measure the actual horror of 9/11, etc?
  2. Do you think certain superhero clichés need to be satirized, so long as the mockery is not too disrespectful of our beloved childhood heroes?













The first grand conceit of the “Stone” series is that there is no Marvel nor DC Universe. “Captain Stone” is this world’s sole “superhero,” and he is a cartoonishly muscle-bound, classically-costumed force-for-good. He and his “Stone Corps” team debut in the aftermath of real world disasters like the Manila earthquake, distributing medicine and food and providing protection to the devastated population. Stone and his Corps render aid at other natural disasters. Then this hero turns vigilante, bringing international drug lords and other “untouchable” criminals to justice. He is admired by both liberals and conservatives for getting results. He becomes a pop hero with comics, novels, movies and an animated series on TV.


For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
Want to submit any ideas, suggestions, collections, or an existing work for consideration for the Today page? We'd love to look at it. Email us at share@deviantart.com
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Comments appreciated. Please respect the model.
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Follow me on facebook :
www.facebook.com/serge.fiedos.…
My website :
www.sergefiedos.com


Some genetic military experiment
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

About a day off finishing this 3ft by 4ft oil over acrylic on canvas painting for a personal project... Just got to let the linseed settle and dry before I go in on the details!
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Just for my great ol bro.....:icondangerfan:...aka DangerBro....:D....i was :plotting: on a classic look of Purple Vixen....kinda like a Origin or where she first started at before she start to wear CatSuits...:3. But she started to wear Leotards as a start to be a evil villian-ette....as she became bad girl....:giggle:. Also i told Dangerfan that i was thinking of her do some leotards....would be different to see for her. So i gave a few made concepts of her in the Leotards with Tights....in two variants...Purple Leo with Purple Transparent Tights then the other with Yellow Opaque Style....:iconyay:. Pretty smexy to see ol PV in this.....:jawdrop:.....:iconomg-plz:.....:faint:....so i hope DangerFan might like....:iconnosebleedplz:.

Made with from items by:
Avi by: IMVU.com--->:iconimvuplz:
CatSuit/Leotard by: Ms.Pixelicious
Tights Skintone for Yellow by: Ms.Pixelicious
Eyes by: ChicByTrinity-Nutsbar
Nails by: Ms.Pixelicious
Skintone by: ChicByTrinity
Hair by: x4ssass1nsxDNAx

I so love some Purple Vixen....she bad....:eyes:....:iconlovepurpleplz::icondangerfan::iconlovepurpleplz::iconiwishplz:
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

You can see the full gallery on www.olgabell.ca
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.