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12-Step Breakdown


of:


A couple more steps were added to this one.

Turn commentary on and off by clicking in the middle of the viewing area.

If it isn't obvious you can go forward and back by clicking on the right and left edges of the viewing area, too. :nod:
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12-Step Breakdown


of:


A long overdue breakdown, now with an updated format that can handle animation!

You may have to roll the mouse around the middle area or go back a step if you don't see any motion. The format's still a little buggy.

Other than that, it should work just fine. If not, let me know so I can troubleshoot.


QUICK NOTES:

Click in the center area for commentary.

Click on the left or right sides of the window to go forward or back.

That's all. Enjoy.
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***INTERACTIVE***
Use the arrows at the bottom to page through the tutorial. :)

This is the process I went through for painting "Lord of the Earth" (full version here: [link] ).

I should note that it's rare that I paint quite the same way twice, so while this is one way I've painted an image, it's not how I *always* do it. (There are, of course, many ways to go about it, and I think you miss out if you just do it one way all the time.)

I'm happy to answer any questions if I can! Hope this is helpful!
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Blog: [link]
Facebook: [link]

This is how I made the "Spicy Explorer Adventures" image.

Enjoy !
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In memory of Mikoto Suoh, our beloved King~♥
Adobe Flash Professional CS6

[K]; Mikoto Suoh GoRA, GoHands
Animation ~Vuorikettu
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* The finished piece can be seen here. *

* Part 02 of the screen recording can be watched here. *

Depending on your connection speed, you'll either see this video moving at warp drive or a reasonable speed.

BREAKDOWN:

1) I start by blocking out the boundaries that I'll be coloring in. The flash of black you see is me creating the base color for the grayscale shading. This is done several times for different objects in the illustration.

2) I move on to the general lighting. I've restricted the light to be cast in only two levels of black and one soft highlight.

3) The grayscale shading is then converted to color using a gradient map. I use separate gradient maps for her skin, lips, eyes, and hair.

4) I move on to refinement in other areas...

I wasn't conscious of all the rotation and zooming that goes on when I work. Hopefully this video is still watchable and helpful in some way...

Everything you see takes place in Photoshop CS4.

Also, one frame of video equals one second of work time.
______________________

DOWNLOAD SIZE = 600x400, 30 fps, 26.5MB
RUN TIME = 3:40
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* The finished piece can be seen here. *

* Part 01 of the Screen Recording can be watched here. *

* Part 02 can be watched here. *

BREAKDOWN:

1a) I continue to finish the first few rows of grass in the background.

1b) Then I throw down the final refining lines on the girl. Just before...

2) I take the chance to tear into the background. Each layer of the grass is separated and hit with flat color using Color Overlay in the Layer Effects.

3) Now I start on the grass in the foreground. Beginning with one blade, I duplicate and position it several times to create separate and additional blades. These grass blades will be moved individually in After Effects, so I make sure they're on their own layers.

4) I move on to further refinement of the girl and choose her final colors using gradient maps. Last, but not least, I color the reed stick she is holding with one last gradient map.

5) Final step: I save and move everything in the file to After Effects for subtle motion editing.

This is the final part of the Girl of the Grasses screen recording series.

Everything you see takes place in Photoshop CS4.

Also, one frame of video equals one second of work time. All three parts of this series combined total 11 minutes of video.

I'll let you have fun doing the math. :D

Feel free to comment and ask questions about this. It was an early attempt at capturing my workflow.
__________________

DOWNLOAD SIZE = 600x400, 30fps, 23.8MB
RUN TIME = 3:40
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RUN TIME = 4:55




Next video -->
Part IB: Ruff Animation B


* See the finished piece

Feel free to comment and ask questions. :aww:



Made in Photoshop CS4 Extended
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~Multimedia Poser Tutorial 1~

Yay!! 100,000 page hits!! :dance::boogie::dance:

**IMPORTANT**
You will need Adobe "Flash Player 10", so make sure to upgrade your player to the latest version or else the tutorial might not run at all. Updating your Flash player is very easy - just go here [link] and get it installed. If you can press a button, you can do it! :D

Want to get started with the 3D program I used to create my entire dA gallery? Here is your chance! This is an easy to follow interactive multimedia presentation that will give you step-by-step instructions to help you learn the Poser 7 basic concepts and functionality.

The tutorial covers the basics such as configuring the 3D workspace, loading figures, posing them, loading clothes, conforming clothes to figures, using materials, hair, lights, cameras, and much more. I wrote about 13 chapters for this tutorial, and you will be asked which ones you want to see, so you can skip chapters whenever you want. Each chapter is loaded with notes and hints that might help you get the best out of Poser 7.

This is my very first tutorial and I don't have a clue how useful it will be to you, so feedback is important if you want it to improve. This was designed for you to use side by side with Poser, so you can follow the instructions hands-on directly in the program. This was NOT meant to teach you how to use Poser without the program. For that I would have to go insane with screen-caps and the tutorial would be come too large to be practical. As it is now it is about 750Kb, which is not bad for 13 interactive multimedia chapters. :)

As a side note, people have asked me to create a tutorial about how to get started with Poser, but I never gave it much thought until I've learned Flash programming. A Poser tutorial would otherwise be too much work to do with plain HTML on a web page, but with AS3 (ActionScript3) it's a different story. Not only I can present much more information in a single area, but I can also make it multimedia and interactive.

Instead of fiddling with rather painful Flash timelines, I decided to use my "AGE-4" game engine (written entirely in AS3) and create a tutorial that runs like a Japanese graphic novel. I don't think anybody has done that before (that I know of). This way, creating the tutorial was a matter of writing a text script for my AGE-4 game engine and let it generate the interactive multimedia presentation for me. So in the end, no painful Flash timelines were used (yay!!). ^^

All AS3 programming here was created 100% by me from scratch, including the "AGE-4" game engine that was used to create this tutorial. The "Ken" 3D avatar shown in this tutorial was designed by me, 3D clothing created by me, and figure is AnimeDoll by MayaX. A Spanish version is coming next, kindly translated by ~villena-mx directly from Mexico! Many thanks to him for the Spanish translation collab work! ^__^

Hope you like and thanks for coming by!
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