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Seems everyone and their mother is making a set of passenger cars these days. WAIT UP BANDWAGON, DON'T LEAVE ME!

Anyway, have a trilogy of W&A passenger equipment. First up is a simple passenger car. Below that an RPO. Last is a Saloon car.
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Pennsylvania Railroads Central division west of Altoona attacked the Alleghany mountains with a 4 track mainline and 150 daily trains. No mountain railroad on earth could come close, none. But the Pennsy did it and during WW2, pushed over 300 trains a day over the mountain. Here we see a PRR 4-8-2 M1a, a Mountain class locomotive of Baldwin design and Juniata build, no more than 12 miles from the location here, MP245, 4 miles west of the famed Horseshoe curve. Here, the railroad hung to the side of the mountain as it fought near 2 percent grades towards the top, Gallitzin. And whats more impressive than a steam locomotive on its hands and knees, working as hard as it can, sanders on with freight trains on each side, and you, your between the rails.

Pencil, 10 hours.
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For your viewing pleasure, I present to you one of my finest drawings Ive drawn to date.

In the late years of the 1940s on a very wet and rainy April afternoon B&O 7610 with a coal extra is nearly stalled on slick rails. The crew struggles to keep the freight moving and in a time before radio communications the 7610 whistles to the rear helper crew to keep pushing in a last effort before stalling and having to double the hill. B&O 7620 with a much lighter time freight charges forth around the slow coal drag.

Both freights are powered by then the latest in steam locomotive technology, the mighty all powerful 2-8-8-4 Yellowstone class EM1. Built by Baldwin locomotive works in 1944.

The two locos fight one of the steepest meanest stretches of railroad in the USA, the many grades east of Grafton. This particular one, 17 mile grade. A ruling grade of nearly 3 percent for...17 miles.

The mighty EM1.

Photo source can be found in "B&O Power". Pencil drawn, 10-15 hours.
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Thirteen hours prior, the Pennsy Saint Louisian departed Saint Louis at 6PM. It is 649AM the following morning, a minute before the scheduled arrival at Pittsburghs Penn station in Pittsburgh, PA according to the June 1956 timetable.

The early summer day is dark and wet as the train prepares to make its 25 minute stop as a Alco RS3 takes off with a local commuter train.

The large cement building in the background is Pittsburghs post office. The rotunda to the right of the PRR E8 is unique to Penn station.

Pencil drawing, 20 hours.
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Every couple of hours, a MARC commuter train would emerge from this tunnel here at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. This is probably one of the most famous as well as the the most scenic train watching spots in the United States. This train originated from Washington D.C. sharing trackage with CSX freight trains as well as Amtrak's daily Capitol Limited which runs between Chicago and Washington. It's interesting to note that the lead locomotive on this train was originally owned by the now defunct Burlington Northern Railroad hauling Metra commuter trains on Chicago's "Racetrack". About four of these classic locomotives have found their way on to the MARC locomotive roster and they spent their final years hauling commuter trains between Baltimore, and Brunswick, Maryland and Harpers Ferry, West Virginia and Washington D.C.

This was hand drawn using common office ball point pens and highlighters.
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A drawing of Baltimore and Ohio's Yellowstone class 2-8-8-4 EM-1. With the announcement of Union Pacific possibly rebuilding a Big Boy, here is a little comparison between the two.

..................EM1.....................Big Boy
Length........125'10"...............132'9"
Drivers.........64"......................68"
Weight........1,010,700........1,250,000
Boiler PSI.....235.....................300
Traction.....115,000 lbs.......135,375

So in essence, a Big Boy could out pull, out run, and get to speed faster than a EM1. Both where the biggest for the railroad they ran. But alas, the Big Boy falls short of being the most powerful. That title goes to N&W's Y6b, 166,000 of traction effort.

Thirty EM-1s where built for the Baltimore and Ohio while none where saved while 25 Big Boys where build for the Union Pacific while EIGHT where saved. Much in the way that 425 Pennsy K4s where build while only 2 saved. Or even worse, 275 New York Central 4-6-4 Hudsons where build and none saved.
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Behold! The Wolf Creek & Flagstone's charming little giant "Shilo".

For those of you who actually read my journal, ;p you may remember me seaking about an articulated 2-4-42 Mallet in HOn3 scale that I'd like to replicate in On30 scale. What's pictured above is the result. Again my I'm drawing W.C.&.F. Locomotive roster out of order. The last engine I posted was #5. I am not quite sure where "Shilo's" place/number will be yet but when I do the final color version I'll be sure ot put it in there. :D

Anyway as stated above, Shilo is based off of an HOn3 scale locomotive by the same name and wheel arrangement. I have copied the locomotive and have only made one visual change. The steam pipes leading from the steam dome to the rear pistons have been altered slightly. The Steam pipes on the HOn3 model started from the center of the steam dome and then headed to the pistons. I moved the start point form the center to the lower or base portion, I felt it would look better. I also added steam exhaust pipes to the front pistons and smoke box.

The locomotive is not based on any real world prototype. The HOn3 model was "Kitbashed" using a pair of Kemtron Brass C-16 class 2-8-0s. There was an article in the Narrow Gauge & Shortline Gazzette on the construction of this charming little locomotive.

And speaking of charm, that's what lead and inspired me to attempt building an On30 version for my Wolf Creek & Flagstone RR. I felt that the loco was SO Charming that I couldn't resist! Wouldn't all of you agree? ;p
But unlike the HOn3 version of this fine little Mallet, mine will have DCC and Sound installed and I'm hoping to have a working smoke unit as well!

Well I hope you all like and enjoy her! I'll be drawing up her tender soon and hope to splice the two pics together to make a real profile drawing.

COMMENT IF YOU FAVE!!!!!
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Steam locomotives are especially challenging to me but some of the most interesting were the post war steam locomotives, especially the streamlined ones for passenger service. This was the golden age of train travel when every railroad would pull out all the stops to get people to ride their trains. Milwaukee Road's fleet of streamlined Hudson locomotives were built specifically for their Hiawatha trains. They didn't just look nice but they would routinely haul long trains at 100 miles per hour. The Olympian Hiawatha operated from 1911 to it's final run in 1961 and ran between Seattle/Tacoma, Washington and Chicago. This Chicago bound train is nearing it's terminus after a long run from Seattle. I used common office ball point pens and a yellow flourescent and orange highlighter.
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This one was pretty fast, only took me a little over an hour.

I couldn't decide what to letter it for, so I figured my Potomac Tie & Timber Co. would probably run something like this. Some parts are old, some new, but it's an altogether cool engine. I guess it has enough junk on it to be a believable logging engine. I put chain about everywhere I could, and there's a toolbox and some other stuff. I couldn't find room for much more XD! She's worked hard, but her crew keeps her clean. Probably a turn-of-the-century build date.

(The firebox turned out pretty deep, ignore that please XD)
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Merry Christmas Everyone. Here's my latest painting: It's a 1932 Ford Coupe hot rodded in a very traditional fashion. The matte bronze paint on it helps it feel right at home in its rustic environment pictured here. The aging GP-9 locomotive in the background compliments the bronze color of the reliquary head turning 32 Ford, a legend amongst hot rodders. If I were ever to release a calendar, I think this piece would fit right at home inside of one. Anyway, Merry Christmas. All Fast Lane Design artwork by Ryan Sardachuk. Click the link to join the official facebook page: www.facebook.com/FastLaneDesign
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