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Rían, daughter of Belegund, was the wife of Huor, son of Galdor; and she was wedded to him two months before he went with Húrin his brother to the Nirnaeth Arnoediad. When no tidings came of her lord she fled into the wild; but she was aided by the Grey-elves of Mithrim, and when her son Tuor was born they fostered him. Then Rían departed from Hithlum, and going to the Haudh-en-Ndengin she laid herself down upon it and died."
"Tuor was taken to foster by Annael of the Grey-elves, who yet lived in those hills. Now when Tuor was sixteen years old the Elves were minded to leave the caves of Androth where they dwelt, and to make their way secretly to the Havens of Sirion in the distant south; but they were assailed by Orcs and Easterlings before they made good their escape, and Tuor was taken captive and enslaved by Lorgan, chief of the Easterlings of Hithlum. For three years he endured that thraldom, but at the end of that time he escaped; and returning to the caves of Androth he dwelt there alone, and did such great hurt to the Easterlings that Lorgan set a price upon his head.
The Silmarillion (chapter 21 & 23)


watercolor pencils, soft pastels

Finally there is the first picture of the six-part series of illustrations for the story of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin (in the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales), which I drew last summer as a commission for certain Tolkien-fans.
Here you can see illustrations connected to the early life of Tuor. In the upper part there are Tuor's parents, brave Huor and faithful Rían saying farewell before the Nirnaeth Arnoediad. In the lower part you can see the Sindar folk of Annael, who fostered Tuor in the woodlands and mountains of Mithrim. And in the main part there is Tour just captured by Lorgan and his savage Easterlings, who settled among the ruins of the great civilization of Hithlum.
The corners feature heraldic devices having some connections to the story: In the upper left there's the House of Hador (paternal ancestors of Tuor) and in lower right the House of Bëor (his maternal ancestors). In lower left it's a swan, which was an emblem of Annael, and finally in the upper right there's the swan wing, later adopted by Tuor himself.

Part 2: Journey to the Sea
Part 3: In Vinyamar
Part 4: Coming to Gondolin
Part 5: The Fall of Gondolin
Part 6: A New Beginning

I hope you like it and I'll appreciate your comments. :-)

------------

If you like my Tolkien-related art, look at my related journal or gallery folder.
But you can find even more of my pictures on my website Angrenost.cz. It's in Czech, but you can still look at the gallery of illustrations. Enjoy! :-)
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Then Tuor looked down upon the fair vale of Tumladen, set as a green jewel amid the encircling hills; and he saw far off upon the rocky height of Amon Gwareth Gondolin the great, city of seven names, whose fame and glory is mightiest in song of all dwellings of the Elves in the Hither Lands.
Then Tuor stood before Turgon son of Fingolfin, High King of the Noldor, and upon the King's right hand there stood Maeglin his sister-son, but upon his left hand sat Idril Celebrindal his daughter; and all that heard the voice of Tuor marvelled, doubting that this were in truth a Man of mortal race, for his words were the words of the Lord of Waters that came to him in that hour. And he gave warning to Turgon that the Curse of Mandos now hastened to its fulfilment, when all the works of the Noldor should perish; and he bade him depart, and abandon the fair and mighty city that he had built, and go down Sirion to the sea. But Turgon was become proud, and Gondolin as beautiful as a memory of Elven Tirion, and he trusted still in its secret and impregnable strength, though even a Vala should gainsay it (...) Maeglin spoke ever against Tuor in the councils of the King, and his words seemed the more weighty in that they went with Turgon's heart; and at the last he rejected the bidding of Ulmo and refused his counsel.
And Tuor remained in Gondolin, for its bliss and its beauty and the wisdom of its people held him enthralled; and he became mighty in stature and in mind, and learned deeply of the lore of the exiled Elves. Then the heart of Idril was turned to him, and his to her; and Maeglin's secret hatred grew ever greater, for he desired above all things to possess her, the only heir of the King of Gondolin.
The Silmarillion (chapter 23)


watercolor pencils, soft pastels

Fourth part of my series of illustrations for the story of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin (in the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales), which I drew last summer as a commission for certain Tolkien-fans.
After a long journey from Vinyamar with Voronwë, Tuor arrived to Godolin at last. This journey could itself be made into a series of illustrations and there are many interesting moments (encountering Túrin at Eithel Ivrin, crossing the guarded road, crossing Brithiach, the Seven Gates of Gondolin, meeting Ecthelion) and I am even tempted to make an intermediate part later to fill up this section of the story. However, in the original commission it was not included.
So in the first panel you can see the glorious city of Gondolin, as seen for the first time by Tuor after he passed the Seventh Gate. I wanted it to look a little dreamlike and not too detailed for it was a fulfilment of a vision from his dreams (as stated in the Unfinished Tales).
The central section shows the audience of Tuor before king Turgon. And lo, there is the highest number of characters in a single panel in this whole series (not counting the Easterlings in the background in the first part). I know I have to practice human figure more, but that's just what I am trying to do. ;-)
The lower panel shows our beloved couple already happily together (though someone is watching them and he doesn't like it at all). Tuor is already somehow older, so I let him grow a beard (also to distinguish him from elves).
This part is special in a way, that the four smallest panels doesn't show just continuation or variation of the motifs from other panels, but also some information of their own: Emblems of the Twelve Houses of the Gondolindrim. Because they are only vaguely described and not painted by Tolkien himself, it was interesting to make them up (with some inspiration from other fan-artists).
The four devices in the corners show of course Tuor's swan wing (upper left), for the first time device of Idril (lower right), once more that of Turgon (upper right) and also device of the House of Finwë (lower left), because High King of the Noldor was also the head of the House of Finwë.

Part 1: Tuor in Hithlum
Part 2: Journey to the Sea
Part 3: Tuor in Vinyamar
Part 5: The Fall of Gondolin
Part 6: A New Beginning

I hope you like it and I'll appreciate your comments. :-)

------------

If you like my Tolkien-related art, look at my related journal or gallery folder.
But you can find even more of my pictures on my website Angrenost.cz. It's in Czech, but you can still look at the gallery of illustrations. Enjoy! :-)
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Beneath the long slopes of Mount Taras in bygone days Turgon had dwelt in the halls of Vinyamar, eldest of all the works of stone that the Noldor built in the lands of their exile. There it still stood, desolate but enduring, high upon great terraces that looked towards the sea. (...) Tuor went up the wide stairs, now half-hidden in thrift and campion, and he passed under the mighty lintel and entered the shadows of the house of Turgon; and he came at last to a high-pillared hall. (...) Then Tuor marvelling saw that on the wall behind the throne were hung a shield and a great hauberk, and a helm and a long sword in a sheath. The hauberk shone as it were wrought of silver untarnished, and the sunbeam gilded it with sparks of gold. But the shield was of a shape strange to Tuor's eyes, for it was long and tapering; and its field was blue, in the midst of which was wrought an emblem of a white swan's wing. Then Tuor spoke, and his voice rang as a challenge in the roof: 'By this token I will take these arms unto myself, and upon myself whatsoever doom they bear.'
Now Tuor felt his feet drawn to the sea-strand, and he went down by long stairs to a wide shore upon the north side of Taras-ness (...). And Tuor stood upon the shore, and the sun was like a smoky fire behind the menace of the sky; and it seemed to him that a great wave rose far off and rolled towards the land, but wonder held him, and he remained there unmoved. And the wave came towards him, and upon it lay a mist of shadow. Then suddenly as it drew near it curled, and broke, and rushed forward in long arms of foam; but where it had broken there stood dark against the rising storm a living shape of great height and majesty. Then Tuor bowed in reverence, for it seemed to him that he beheld a mighty king. A tall crown he wore like silver, from which his long hair fell down as foam glimmering in the dusk. (...) And thereupon Ulmo lifted up a mighty horn, and blew upon it a single great note, to which the roaring of the storm was but a wind-flaw upon a lake. And as he heard that note, and was encompassed by it, and filled with it, it seemed to Tuor that the coasts of Middle-earth vanished, and he surveyed all the waters of the world in a great vision: from the veins of the lands to the mouths of the rivers, and from the strands and estuaries out into the deep.
He awoke at length in the grey light, and arose, and left the high seat (...). And Tuor looked down from the lowest terrace and saw, leaning against its wall among the stones and the sea-wrack, an Elf, clad in a grey cloak sodden with the sea. Silent he sat, gazing beyond the ruin of the beaches out over the long ridges of the waves. All was still, and there was no sound save the roaring of the surf below. As Tuor stood and looked at the silent grey figure he remembered the words of Ulmo, and a name untaught came to his lips, and he called aloud: "Welcome, Voronwë! I await you."
The Unfinished Tales (Of Tuor and his Coming to Gondolin)


watercolor pencils, soft pastels

Third part at last of my series of illustrations for the story of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin (in the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales), which I drew last summer as a commission for certain Tolkien-fans.
Tuor had come to Vinyamar, found the armour which had been left there long before by king Turgon and he encountered first the Vala Ulmo and then Voronwë who then took him to Gondolin. It is really a powerful part of the story and it wasn't easy for me to decide, how to illustrate it. Ulmo appearing to Tuor is one of the most popular scenes from the Silmarillion, if I can judge from the number of illustrations (I saw at least six versions of it, including of course famous illustrators such as Ted Nasmith) so I chose a slightly different approach, showing not the meeting itself, but rather the vision of waters of Arda. As for the lower panel with Voronwë, you may have seen my older illustration of Vinyamar, so here I took the liberty to use a previously established setting. :-)
As for the heraldry, there are of course two of Tuor's swan wings again, and then two elven heraldic devices I had to imagine myself. In the upper left corner there is the device of Turgon (many months ago when I was drawing it, I asked my fellow illustrators here on dA what should Turgon's emblem look like with four possible versions I imagined. Final version isn't identical to any one of these, but mostly it takes from #2 and #4). And in the lower right there is the device of Voronwë (a lot of blue and green because of his connection to the sea).

Part 1: Tuor in Hithlum
Part 2: Journey to the Sea
Part 4: Coming to Gondolin
Part 5: The Fall of Gondolin
Part 6: A New Beginning

I hope you like it and I'll appreciate your comments. :-)

------------

If you like my Tolkien-related art, look at my related journal or gallery folder.
But you can find even more of my pictures on my website Angrenost.cz. It's in Czech, but you can still look at the gallery of illustrations. Enjoy! :-)
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At last, in the year when Eärendil was seven years old, Morgoth was ready, and he loosed upon Gondolin his Balrogs, and his Orcs, and his wolves; and with them came dragons of the brood of Glaurung, and they were become now many and terrible. Of the deeds of desperate valour there done, by the chieftains of the noble houses and their warriors, and not least by Tuor, much is told in The Fall of Gondolin: of the battle of Ecthelion of the Fountain with Gothmog Lord of Balrogs in the very square of the King, where each slew the other, and of the defence of the tower of Turgon by the people of his household, until the tower was overthrown; and mighty was its fall and the fall of Turgon in its ruin.
Tuor sought to rescue Idril from the sack of the city, but Maeglin had laid hands on her, and on Eärendil; and Tuor fought with Maeglin on the walls, and cast him far out, and his body as it fell smote the rocky slopes of Amon Gwareth thrice ere it pitched into the flames below. Then Tuor and Idril led such remnants of the people of Gondolin as they could gather in the confusion of the burning down the secret way which Idril had prepared.
There was a dreadful pass, Cirith Thoronath it was named, the Eagles' Cleft, where beneath the shadow of the highest peaks a narrow path wound its way; on the right hand it was walled by a precipice, and on the left a dreadful fall leapt into emptiness. Along that narrow way their march was strung, when they were ambushed by Orcs, for Morgoth had set watchers all about the encircling hills; and a Balrog was with them. Then dreadful was their plight, and hardly would they have been saved by the valour of yellow-haired Glorfindel, chief of the House of the Golden Flower of Gondolin, had not Thorondor come timely to their aid.
Many are the songs that have been sung of the duel of Glorfindel with the Balrog upon a pinnacle of rock in that high place; and both fell to ruin in the abyss. (...) Then Thorondor bore up Glorfindel's body out of the abyss, and they buried him in a mound of stones beside the pass; and a green turf came there, and yellow flowers bloomed upon it amid the barrenness of stone, until the world was changed.
The Silmarillion (chapter 23)


watercolor pencils

Fifth part of my set of illustrations for the story of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin (in the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales), which I drew last summer as a commission for certain Tolkien-fans.
This page is solely dedicated to the three crucial duels which took place during the Fall of Gondolin and shortly afterwards. The two scenes of mighty elven lords fighting balrogs mirror each other in the upper and lower panel, while the central scene depicts our main characters again. These are possibly the first serious fight illustrations I've ever made, so I hope they don't look too bad. :-)
As for the heraldic devices, there are again the ones of Tuor and Idril in the upper right and lower left corners respectively. The other two, as you might have guessed belong to Ecthelion and and Glorfindel and cohere with both of their fight scenes. I had to make up these two emblems myself, but it was quite interesting to do (obviously starting from the motifs of fountain and golden flower).

Part 1: Tuor in Hithlum
Part 2: Journey to the Sea
Part 3: Tuor in Vinyamar
Part 4: Coming to Gondolin
Part 6: A New Beginning

I hope you like it and I'll appreciate your comments. :-)

------------

If you like my Tolkien-related art, look at my related journal or gallery folder.
But you can find even more of my pictures on my website Angrenost.cz. It's in Czech, but you can still look at the gallery of illustrations. Enjoy! :-)
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Thus led by Tuor son of Huor the remnant of Gondolin passed over the mountains, and came down into the Vale of Sirion; and fleeing southward by weary and dangerous marches they came at length to Nan-tathren, the Land of Willows, for the power of Ulmo yet ran in the great river, and it was about them. There they rested a while, and were healed of their hurts and weariness; but their sorrow could not be healed. And they made a feast in memory of Gondolin and of the Elves that had perished there, the maidens, and the wives, and the warriors of the King; and for Glorfindel the beloved many were the songs they sang, under the willows of Nan-tathren in the waning of the year. There Tuor made a song for Eärendil his son, concerning the coming of Ulmo the Lord of Waters to the shores of Nevrast aforetime; and the sea-longing woke in his heart, and in his son's also. Therefore Idril and Tuor departed from Nan-tathren, and went southwards down the river to the sea; and they dwelt there by the mouths of Sirion, and joined their people to the company of Elwing Dior's daughter, that had fled thither but a little while before.
In those days Tuor felt old age creep upon him, and ever a longing for the deeps of the Sea grew stronger in his heart. Therefore he built a great ship, and he named it Eärrámë, which is Sea-Wing; and with Idril Celebrindal he set sail into the sunset and the West, and came no more into any tale or song. But in after days it was sung that Tuor alone of mortal Men was numbered among the elder race, and was joined with the Noldor, whom he loved; and his fate is sundered from the fate of Men.
Bright Eärendil was then lord of the people that dwelt nigh to Sirion's mouths; and he took to wife Elwing the fair, and she bore to him Elrond and Elros, who are called the Half-elven. Yet Eärendil could not rest, and his voyages about the shores of the Hither Lands eased not his unquiet. Two purposes grew in his heart, blended as one in longing for the wide Sea: he sought to sail thereon, seeking after Tuor and Idril who returned not; and he thought to find perhaps the last shore, and bring ere he died the message of Elves and Men to the Valar in the West, that should move their hearts to pity for the sorrows of Middle-earth.
Great was the sorrow of Eärendil and Elwing for the ruin of the havens of Sirion, and the captivity of their sons, and they feared that they would be slain. (...) Yet Eärendil saw now no hope left in the lands of Middle-earth, and he turned again in despair and came not home, but sought back once more to Valinor with Elwing at his side.
The Silmarillion (chapters 23 and 24)


watercolor pencils, soft pastels

Sixth and final part of my set of illustrations for the story of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin (in the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales), which I drew last summer as a commission for certain Tolkien-fans.
In this part we see in fact more of Tuor's son Eärendil than Tuor himself. The upper panel shows the refugees of Gondolin resting in Nan Tathren, with Tuor playing on his harp to Eärendil. The main scene shows the end of the story of Tuor and Idril, as far as Middle-earth is concerned: The ship Earrámë sails into sunset, while Eärendil watches from the shore. And the last panel is meant to mirror the very first in the series (upper panel of the firstt part), which showed Tuor's parents Huor and Rían. Here we see Eärendil with his wife Elwing aboard Vingilot, after her famous rescue from the Havens (if you want to know more, read Silmarillion ;-)). And while the above-mentioned first scene was a sad one, with Huor departing to war where he would perish, this one is meant to be hopeful – Eärendil and Elwing are reunited and the Silmaril embodies hope for the Middle-earth itself.
As for the heraldic devices, it is quite obvious: Tuor and Idril again, in the upper left and lower right corner respectively, then Eärendil in the upper right and of course the silmarils in the lower left. I didn't have to invent anything like in the previous part, these are all canonical.

Part 1: Tuor in Hithlum
Part 2: Journey to the Sea
Part 3: Tuor in Vinyamar
Part 4: Coming to Gondolin
Part 5: The Fall of Gondolin

I hope you like it and I'll appreciate your comments. :-)

------------

If you like my Tolkien-related art, look at my related journal or gallery folder.
But you can find even more of my pictures on my website Angrenost.cz. It's in Czech, but you can still look at the gallery of illustrations. Enjoy! :-)
Show
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No comments have been added yet.


"They rose and looked about them. Northward the dale ran up into a glen of shadows between two great arms of the mountains, above which three white peaks were shining: Celebdil, Fanuidhol, Caradhras. the Mountains of Moria. At the head of the glen a torrent flowed like a white lace over an endless ladder of short falls, and a mist of foam hung in the air about the mountains' feet.
`Yonder is the Dimrill Stair,' said Aragorn, pointing to the falls. 'Down the deep-cloven way that climbs beside the torrent we should have come, if fortune had been kinder.'
`Or Caradhras less cruel,' said Gimli. `There he stands smiling in the sun! ' He shook his fist at the furthest of the snow-capped peaks and turned away.
To the east the outflung arm of the mountains marched to a sudden end, and far lands could be descried beyond them, wide and vague. To the south the Misty Mountains receded endlessly as far as sight could reach. Less than a mile away, and a little below them, for they still stood high up on the west side of the dale, there lay a mere. It was long and oval, shaped like a great spear-head thrust deep into the northern glen; but its southern end was beyond the shadows under the sunlit sky. Yet its waters were dark: a deep blue like clear evening sky seen from a lamp-lit room. Its face was still and unruffled. About it lay a smooth sward, shelving down on all sides to its bare unbroken rim.
`There lies the Mirrormere, deep Kheled-zâram! ' said Gimli sadly. `I remember that he said:
"May you have joy of the sight! But we cannot linger there." Now long shall I journey ere I have joy again. It is I that must hasten away, and he that must remain.'
The Company now went down the road from the Gates. It was rough and broken, fading to a winding track between heather and whin that thrust amid the cracking stones. But still it could be seen that once long ago a great paved way had wound upwards from the lowlands of the Dwarf-kingdom.
In places there were ruined works of stone beside the path, and mounds of green topped with slender birches, or fir-trees sighing in the wind. An eastward bend led them hard by the sward of Mirrormere, and there not far from the roadside stood a single column broken at the top.
'That is Durin's Stone! ' cried Gimli. `I cannot pass without turning aside for a moment to look at the wonder of the dale! '
`Be swift then! ' said Aragorn, looking back towards the Gates. `The Sun sinks early. The Orcs will not, maybe, come out till after dusk, but we must be far away before nightfall. The Moon is almost spent, and it will be dark tonight.'
'Come with me, Frodo! ' cried the dwarf, springing from the road. `I would not have you go without seeing Kheled-zâram.' He ran down the long green slope. Frodo followed slowly, drawn by the still blue water in spite of hurt and weariness; Sam came up behind.
Beside the standing stone Gimli halted and looked up. It was cracked and weather-worn, and the faint runes upon its side could not be read. `This pillar marks the spot where Durin first looked in the Mirrormere,' said the dwarf. 'Let us look ourselves once, ere we go!'
They stooped over the dark water. At first they could see nothing. Then slowly they saw the forms of the encircling mountains mirrored in a profound blue, and the peaks were like plumes of white flame above them; beyond there was a space of sky. There like jewels sunk in the deep shone glinting stars, though sunlight was in the sky above. Of their own stooping forms no shadow could be seen.
'O Kheled-zâram fair and wonderful! ' said Gimli. `There lies the Crown of Durin till he wakes. Farewell! ' He bowed, and turned away, and hastened back up the green-sward to the road again."


coloured pencils

Just like my earlier picture Uninvited Guest, I made it for a Czech illustrators' website Projekt ilustrace, for October monthly contest "The Fellowship of the Ring" (the theme was to be any scene from that book, not necessarily the Fellowship itself). As a Tolkien artist I couldn't have missed it. :-)

------------

If you like my Tolkien-related art, look at my related journal or gallery folder.
But you can find even more of my pictures on my website Angrenost.cz. It's in Czech, but you can still look over the gallery of illustrations. Enjoy! :-)
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Finwe Noldoran was the first High King of the Noldor, who led his Elven people on the journey from Middle-earth to Valinor in the blessed realm of Aman.
he was Miriel Serinde's husband, righon.deviantart.com/art/The-… and Feanor righon.deviantart.com/art/The-… became their son, but after her death took in wife Indis Calime righon.deviantart.com/art/Shin…. Findis, Nolofinwe righon.deviantart.com/art/The-… , Irime righon.deviantart.com/art/Spri… and Arafinwe were their children.

Character from Silmarillion.

aquarelle pencils, rapidograph, liner, mechanical pencil
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(Please check the fullview. The preview is quite underwhelming.)

Fingon, moments before the fateful moment of making the song that will help him discover his cousin Maedhros upon Thangorodrim.

Therefore he [Fingon] dared a deed which is justly renowned among the feats of the Princes of the Noldor: alone, and without the counsel of any, he set forth in search of Maedhros; and aided by the very darkness that Morgoth had made he came unseen into the fastness of his foes. High upon the shoulders of Thangorodrim he climbed, and looked in despair upon the desolation of the land; but no passage or crevice could he find through which he might come within Morgoth's stronghold.

(J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter XIII: Of the Return of the Noldor)

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Melkor out of Arda
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illustration for ''Silmarillion'' of Tolkien
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