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Similar Deviations
Inspired from the house flags of HBO's series Game of Thrones.
The result of a lazy afternoon. It was just for fun.
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Here It is!
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House Durin ~ (The Hobbit et al)
Available as prints, phone cases, pillows, totes, & more on RedBubble

    The world was young, the mountains green,
    No stain yet on the Moon was seen,
    No words were laid on stream or stone
    When Durin woke and walked alone.
    He named the nameless hills and dells;
    He drank from yet untasted wells;
    He stooped and looked in Mirrormere,
    And saw a crown of stars appear,
    As gems upon a silver thread,
    Above the shadows of his head.

    The world was fair, the mountains tall,
    In Elder Days before the fall
    Of mighty kings in Nargothrond
    And Gondolin, who now beyond
    The Western Seas have passed away:
    The world was fair in Durin's Day.

    A king he was on carven throne
    In many-pillared halls of stone
    With golden roof and silver floor,
    And runes of power upon the door.
    The light of sun and star and moon
    In shining lamps of crystal hewn
    Undimmed by cloud or shade of night
    There shone for ever fair and bright.

    There hammer on the anvil smote,
    There chisel clove, and graver wrote;
    There forged was blade, and bound was hilt;
    The delver mined, the mason built.
    There beryl, pearl, and opal pale,
    And metal wrought like fishes' mail,
    Buckler and corslet, axe and sword,
    And shining spears were laid in hoard.

    Unwearied then were Durin's folk;
    Beneath the mountains music woke:
    The harpers harped, the minstrels sang,
    And at the gates the trumpets rang.

    The world is grey, the mountains old,
    The forge's fire is ashen-cold;
    No harp is wrung, no hammer falls:
    The darkness dwells in Durin's halls;
    The shadow lies upon his tomb
    In Moria, in Khazad-dûm.
    But still the sunken stars appear
    In dark and windless Mirrormere;
    There lies his crown in water deep,
    Till Durin wakes again from sleep.


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About the Piece:

Now one of the most prominent houses in Tolkien lore thanks to the trilogy of The Hobbit movies, the House of Durin was on my shortlist for this sigil series from the start. :nod: Initially, I was unaware that the Durin house had any sort of canon emblems and thus thought about using some general imagery - the Arkenstone, hammers, axes, etc - to create one. After some quick Google searching, though, I found there were some canon symbols and sought to use those in a modified manner. Ultimately, this overall emblem is based on the imagery seen on the Door of Moria albeit with a few changes. On the Door, the stars as well as the anvil/hammer are all very linear whereas I wanted this design to be more rounded; I felt changing the design of the anvil/hammer was necessary as the original just didn't flow right. I also toyed with the idea of Dwarvish runes integrated into the banner somehow but couldn't figure out what the runes should say to be associated in full with Durin's Folk. As for the house motto, I chose the phrase "Undimmed, unwearied" after looking through Tolkien's poems. I know the phrase might seem contradictory to the sadness in the poem that inspired it (The Song of Durin, sung by Gimli in The Fellowship of the Ring) as well as the grim fates of Durin's heirs: Thorin, Kili, and Fili. That, however, is actually more so what drives the whole point. The House of Durin suffers extremely at the hands of orcs, dragons, and other malice over the generations and can ultimately tell great stories of grief. However, the House of Durin and Durin's Folk continually strive to rebuild, reforge, and recreate. Erebor may have been lost to evil, but after it is reclaimed by Thorin et al, it becomes prosperous yet again as well as a key battle point in the War of the Ring. The House of Durin and Durin's Folk thus epitomize the words found in The Song of Durin, which is exactly why I chose them. ;) This poster gave me a bit of trouble but ultimately I'm happy with how it turned out in the end. I hope other Tolkien fans enjoy it, too. :D

More from the Sigil Series:

House Eorl by ever-so-excited House Auditore by ever-so-excited House Ibn-La'Ahad by ever-so-excited House Everdeen by ever-so-excited
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House Eorl ~ (The Lord of the Rings et al)
Available as prints, phone cases, pillows, totes, & more on RedBubble

Arise now, arise, Riders of Théoden!
Dire deeds awake, dark it is eastward.
Let horse be bridled, horn be sounded!
Forth Eorlingas!


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About the Piece:

While heraldry, tapestries, banners, and flags are definitely something the Lord of the Rings series already has a lot of, it didn't deter me from making my own versions for my Sigil Series! Wink/Razz With the overall Sigil Series initially inspired by the banners and "house" symbolism/motto as seen in Game of Thrones, this specific piece for Rohan's royal House of Eorl is a reinterpretation of one of the banners seen in the films that was also made into a really cool bookmark (that I still have) when The Two Towers was released. Unlike my sigil piece for House Auditore (Assassin's Creed), this piece is not at all opulent or decorative as the Kingdom of Rohan is not one of excess and grandeur. Motifs are generally subdued, colors rich but not bright, and adornments left for only when necessary. I think the overall piece is representative of the general style of other hangings/banners/etc you might see in Rohan and I hope others agree. ;) (Wink) For the house "slogan", I chose the motto "Let horn be sounded," a line from a call to arms Theoden chants to the Rohirrim in The Two Towers. Considering the main symbol on the banner is already a horse, I thought having the slogan say "Let horse be bridled" would be somewhat redundant; horses are already the main emblem of Rohirric culture so I chose to represent another important symbol, the horn, instead. I also feel "let horn be sounded" has a more somewhat intimidating feel to it and is thus more representative of the military aspect of Rohan versus the overall everyday culture symbolized by the horse. Nod I'm really happy with how this first Sigil piece turned out and I look forward to doing more for LOTR as well as other fandoms. I am a dummy! I hope you all enjoy them, too!

More from the Sigil Series:

House Auditore by ever-so-excited House Ibn-La'Ahad by ever-so-excited House Durin by ever-so-excited House Everdeen by ever-so-excited
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I hope you like It.
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House Ibn-La'Ahad ~ (Assassin's Creed)
Available as prints, phone cases, pillows, totes, t-shirts & more on RedBubble

Peace in all things.

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About the Piece:

Having already done a house sigil for Ezio and the Auditore Family (see my House Auditore piece), I knew I wanted to try my hand at doing something a bit different and giving Assassin's Creed's original hero, Altaïr Ibn-La'Ahad, a sigil banner as well. I've never played the original Assassin's Creed, but given its setting in the 12th century middle east and heavy political influence regarding Christianity vs. Islam, the game sounds like one that needs to go on my life "to-do list", for sure. :nod: Without having played the game, though, I wasn't sure about how to really put this banner together and I will let you all know right now that there is another [very different] version of this piece; this one ultimately won out for the Sigil Series, though. ;) Although I'm familiar with middle eastern art history, I focused on researching Islamic illuminations to make sure the piece had an overtly Islamic influence. The original version of this banner was just that but had strong rectangular borders, highly defined spaces, and other attributes that made it look like it was strictly meant to be in a book. I really like the original version and I think it screams "Islamic art" more than this one does, but at the end of the day I felt this one matched the rest of the Sigil Series pieces and thus looked more like a sibling vs. a cousin. All the pieces are more open in the center and give the emblems a lot of room to shine - none of them look like a book illustration and so this one couldn't, either. :-p I enjoy how this one came out, though, and I'm actually really happy with it. I chose the color scheme based on 1) Altaïr's robes, both as an Assassin and as a Mentor (they are emerald), as well as the presence of green throughout middle eastern and Islamic cultural heritage. The border at the top as well as the floral design behind the emblem are, in fact, from genuine mid-ages Islamic illuminations albeit with some aesthetic modification. The green symbol in the center is a part of the Levantine Assassin's insignia and thus one closely tied to Altaïr and his family given their extensive work in establishing the Order there. It might be hard to see in small sizes, but the corners also have the Assassin logo in them. :D As for the house "motto", I chose the phrase "Peace in all things" as finding and understanding peace seems to be a continuous question for Altaïr throughout his quests and something Al Mualim pushes in lesson a lot, for example:

Al Mualim: Do you remember, Altaïr, what the Assassins fight for?
Altaïr: Peace, in all things.
Al Mualim
: Yes, in all things! It is not enough to end the violence one man commits upon another. It refers to peace within as well. We cannot have one without the other.

Peace is brought up a lot throughout the game, from what I have read, and so I felt the phrase was one that fit with Altaïr and his family very well. Altaïr is the son of a Christian woman and Muslim father, but also goes on to marry Maria Thorpe, an Englishwoman and his former Templar enemy - proving that peace, indeed, can be in all things. ;) I think it fits pretty well. I hope other AC fans agree and I hope everyone enjoys this Sigil piece!

More from the Sigil Series:

House Auditore by ever-so-excited House Durin by ever-so-excited House Eorl by ever-so-excited House Everdeen by ever-so-excited
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