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Similar Deviations
as per request, something fellowship related.

being an immortal, Legolas is a figure apart from the rest of the Company of the Ring, and I was struck, while recently re-reading some chapters from LOTR, at how Tolkien continually reminds us what a different beast he truly is; whether it's walking on snow or riding horses without a saddle, or his impossibly keen vision, or how he apparently doesn't need to sleep, in the traditional sense. He seems at almost all times to be only half in the present moment; the other half of him lost in dreams, or simply pulsing with the Earth itself. In a way, despite the perfectly civilized culture (and definite whiteness) of the elves, Legolas kind of functions as the "noble savage" of the fellowship; I think of him as akin to a figure like Queequeg, living with one foot in a world that the white man (or mortals, in Legolas's case) cant understand. I actually think Olando Bloom often managed to capture that very successfully, when he wasnt too busy surfing things.

one of my favorite moments with the character comes during the three-day chase of the uruk-hai across Rohan, when Aragorn, waking from a much needed sleep, finds Legolas awake, standing and brooding against the starry night sky. It's one of those moments where you get a sense of just what a different thing it is to be an elf; how old is Legolas? he could very well be in his thousands, unchanged since before the earliest days of kingdoms like Rohan or Erebor, and all of it lived with these inestimably heightened senses to the world around him. Elves are definitely a trip to think about.

part of the Weekly Tolkien Sketchblog
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This is the second in a series of three drawings depicting various versions of Tolkien's "Roads go ever on and on" poem/walking song. Part One: [link] Part Three: [link]

This is probably my favorite version of this hobbit song. It's the second verse in the poem as related in "The Hobbit." Like Biblo, I appreciate adventure-- if for nothing else than it makes you appreciate your own mundane and altogether lovely life.

I drew Bilbo coming home to the Shire from his adventures in the East. Tolkien painting some awesome paintings for "The Hobbit" and I tried to kinda-sorta copy his version of Hobbiton and the Bag End hill.

And yes, I know he oughtn't be wearing a red shirt and that he should have his travel cloak and whatnot. Just taking artistic liscense. :)

And the scans shows the buckled paper only too clearly. :(
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This is the first in a series of three drawings depicting various versions of Tolkien's "Roads go ever on and on" poem/walking song. Part Two: [link] Part Three: [link]

The Lord of the Rings is incredibly inspirational to me, but believe it or not, I hadn't read the books all the way through in over four years. A couple of months ago I started to read it through slowly, starting with the Hobbit, when I rediscovered one of my favorite poems.

This version is the first verse of Bilbo's walking song from "The Hobbit." I drew Gandalf sitting and thinking; he could be waiting and ready to commence either Bilbo or Frodo's adventures.

Anyways, this is also an experiment in watercolors (and I'm deeply regretting just doing this on journal paper, it got really wrinkly and the paper started to feather!).

And I of course had to be redundant and put the tehtar above the vowels. And I did my best to copy Bilbo's-style of handwriting that you see glimpses of in the LOTR movies.

(I can't wait for the Hobbit movie!)
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I don't usually visit my nephews, but when I do they get all the cracking good tales
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"Where is the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing? They have passed like rain on the mountain, like wind in the meadow. The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow.
How did it come to this?"

6th in the series of recreating Alan Lee's wonderful illustrations on the Return Of The King credits.

Featuring Bernard Hill as King Theoden of Rohan

Please check out the other character studies in this set :)


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Recent sketching work.
Just saw The Desolation of Smaug...forever drawing dragons, hahaha
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This is the third in a series of three drawings depicting various versions of Tolkien's "Roads go ever on and on" poem/walking song. Part one: [link] Part Two: [link]

Sam carrying Frodo to Mount Doom.

This part always makes me cry... and it's very difficult to draw people being carried, so I did purposefully copy the poses and clothing from the LotR RotK movie.

The hobbit walking song has a ton of variations, and this one is from "Lord of the Rings," not "The Hobbit" like the verses from my other drawings.

I didn't realize until after I drew this "The Road goes ever on and on" verse is repeated later on, repleacing "eager feet" with "weary feet." Weary would fit this illustration better, but oh well!

Aaaaand, there is one last version of this poem that I could find, spoken by the elderly Bilbo at the end of all the adventures:

"The Road goes ever on and on
Out from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
Let others follow it who can!
Let them a journey new begin,
But I at last with weary feet
Will turn towards the lighted inn,
My evening-rest and sleep to meet."
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The Tale of Beren and Lúthien


It is told that Beren, after the death of his father and kinsmen, journeyed to the elven land of Doriath, where none dared to tread. He came graven of heart, and bowed with many years of woe. Wandering through the summer woods of Neldoreth, at a time of evening, under moonrise, Beren came upon Lúthien  as she danced upon the unfading grass in the glades beside Esgalduin. Then all memory of his pain departed from him, and he fell into an enchantment ; for Lúthien was the most beautiful of all the children of ILuvatar. Blue was her raiment as the unclouded heaven, but her eyes like the starlit evening, and her mantle sewn with golden flowers, but her hair was dark as Shadows of twilight. As the light upon the leaves of trees, as the voices of clear waters, as the stars above the mists of the world, such was her glory and her loveliness... and in her face was a shining light...
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J.R.R. Tolkien
watercolor, ink, leaf metal flakes
You can see steps here
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