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Similar Deviations
photoing in chenshan plant park~~
a little frog looking at some flower~~
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in holiday I took the photo in chenshan plant park,and a little ps.
canon G11
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photographer:Ryohei Takanashi
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Look like its going to hatch :) Taken in Singapore at night.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysope…
The green lacewing eggs are oval and secured to the plant by long slender stalks. They are pale green when first laid but become gray later. The larvae are about one millimetre long when they first hatch. They are brown and resemble small alligators, crawling actively around in search of prey.[2] They have a pair of pincer-like mandibles on their head with which they grasp their prey, sometimes lifting the victim off the leaf surface to prevent its escape. The larvae inject enzymes into the bodies of their victims which digest the internal organs, after which they suck out the liquidated body fluids.[3] The larvae grow to about eight millimetres long before they spin circular cocoons and pupate.[2]

Adult green lacewings are a pale green colour with long, threadlike antennae and glossy, golden, compound eyes. They have a delicate appearance and are from twelve to twenty millimetres long with large, membranous, pale green wings which they fold tent-wise above their abdomens. They are weak fliers and have a fluttery form of flight. They are often seen during the evenings and at night when they are attracted by lights.
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:iconenkased:
RVA
Red Velvet Ant
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28mm Nikkor reversed
Interfit diffuser
3 shot focus stack
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Full body of this cute beetle Platypodinae by melvynyeo

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phragmos…
Phragmosis is any method by which an animal defends itself in its burrow by using its own body as a barrier. An example can be seen in the mygalomorph spider Idiosoma nigrum (Black Rugose Trapdoor Spider), which protects itself in its burrow by positioning itself so as to block the burrow with its abdomen, which is unusually hard. Even more perfect is the shield of Cyclocosmia species (Ctenizidae). It is also commonly seen in some ant genera, in which the soldiers have unusually large, disc-shaped heads, which are used to block nest entrances against intruders.

Quote from Doug Yanega (from Entomology Group in FB)
The modification of the end of the elytra is termed "phragmotic", which basically means it's used as a plug to block the tunnel; an anti-predator and anti-parasite adaptation. Really well-defined plugs like this are fairly common in platypodines and scolytines, as well as unrelated wood-boring beetles like bostrichids, and even some termites (e.g. some Cryptotermes), ants (e.g. Cephalotes and Colobopsis) and spiders (e.g. Cyclocosmia). It is actually remarkable that there are almost no bees or aculeate solitary wasps with similar adaptations (not to this degree, at least), given that they also normally inhabit burrows. There's a few xylocopine apids (e.g., species of carpenter bees in the subgenus Calloxylocopa) that have the tip of the abdomen modified and used as a phragmotic plug, but even those lack the well-defined sharp edges that are seen in beetles like the one above. Maybe being able to sting with it means that one's butt is already a good enough deterrent?
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(c) Cosmin Munteanu
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