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Amarok (or Amaroq) is the name of a gigantic wolf in Inuit mythology.

It is said to hunt down and devour anyone foolish enough to hunt alone at night. Unlike real wolves who hunt in packs, Amarok hunts alone. It is sometimes considered equivalent to the waheela of cryptozoology.

UPDATED
I've received a number of comments concerning Amarok's wolf head design as not based on Inuit rather than from the Pacific Northeast culture. I am deeply aware of that. I wanted to design something unique by blending two different cultures. But since its such a concern, I decided to change it to something close to Inuit culture.
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The raven also has a prominent role in the mythologies of the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast, including the Tsimishian, Haida, Heiltsuk, Tlingit, Kwakwaka’wakw, Coast Salish, Koyukons, and Inuit.

The raven in these indigenous peoples’ mythology is the Creator of the world, but it is also considered a trickster god.
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Bake-kujira
化け鯨 (ばけくじら)
Ghost Whale

Once long ago an enormous skeletal whale appeared off the coast of Shimane Prefecture, accompanied by a host of strange fish and ominous birds. A fisherman tried throwing his harpoon at it, but it had no effect, and the ghost whale continued out to sea with its eerie multitude.
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A mythical hooved Chinese chimerical creature known throughout various East Asian cultures, and is said to appear with the imminent arrival or passing of a wise sage or an illustrious ruler. It is a good omen that brings rui (Chinese:瑞; pinyin: ruì; roughly translated as “serenity” or “prosperity”). It is often depicted with what looks like fire all over its body. It is sometimes called the “Chinese unicorn” when compared with the Western unicorn.
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Day 22 Challenge - Your favorite season.

Summer.
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Day 15 Challenge - Your favorite board or video game character.

Mario Pixel Anatomy (C) Daryl Toh Liem Zhan 2012.
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Day 20 Challenge - A comic.

Taking this as an advantage to update FMM.
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Day 10 Challenge - Something you can't live without: a brain.

Without it, you're good as dead. Or undead.
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Nukekubi, meaning Detachable Neck, also written in Japanese Hiragana characters as "ぬけくび" or Japanese Katakana characters as "ヌケクビ" (But still read as "Nukekubi") are monsters found in Japanese folklore. By day, nukekubi appear to be normal human beings. By night, however, their heads detach at the neck smoothly from their bodies and fly about independently in search of human prey. These heads attack by screaming (to increase their victims' fright), then closing in and biting.

While the head is detached, the body of a nukekubi becomes inanimate. In some legends, this serves as one of the creature's few weaknesses; if a nukekubi's head cannot locate and reattach to its body by sunrise, the creature dies. Legends often tell of would-be victims foiling the creatures by destroying or hiding their bodies while the heads are elsewhere.

In Mike Mignola's Hellboy, nukekubi were featured in the all time popular short story, "Heads".
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A cyclops in Greek mythology and later Roman mythology, was a member of a primordial race of giants, each with a single eye in the middle of his forehead. The name is widely thought to mean “circle-eyed”.
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