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Similar Deviations
I said I'd attempt another version and I did.
Again, not *quite* satisfied...

But I think I like this one a bit better...

The B&W version can be found here: [link]
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illustration for ''Silmarillion'' of Tolkien
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Middle-Earth's most famous lovers, living out their last days in peace under the eaves of Tol Galen, a slight change of pace for me.

The idea to depict them in old age was motivated primarily (if I'm being honest) by not feeling quite up to the task of depicting Luthien in her prime ;) but also because it seemed a really good place in their story (namely the end) from which to view the story as a whole; their timeless, perfect love, their unparalleled feats, their overcoming of fate and death (or perhaps they were simply fated to do exactly as they did; it is after all by their union that a strain of divinity enters into the human race, which stands to inherit the earth one day) and their life upon returning from the Halls of Mandos, lived out in a kind of heaven-on-earth, isolated and content in their love and seemingly retired from the troubles of elves and men (robin williams' and anabella sciora's happy home in the hereafter in "what dreams may come" is basically what I think of for Dor-firn-i-Chuinar)

I wanted both of them, and especially Luthien, to actually look old (you know, not like a twenty five year old beauty queen in old-age makeup, like you see far too often in the last scenes of those decade-spanning movies) in some ways the image (the one in my head, not necessarily the one I was able to put down on paper) of the most beautiful of all the children of Illuvatar, born to live forever, growing old and dying, but happy and in the arms of her beloved is both impossibly sad but also joyous, like the Lay of Leithian itself; the loss of Luthien is a sore one from which the elves and seemingly the earth itself will never entirely recover, but she was lost of her own decision, and did so, as per the lay's closing line, without sorrow. I could imagine the two of them leaving the world like this, to be found where they lie by Dior shortly thereafter.

Part of the Weekly Tolkien Sketchblog. Special thanks to John Howe for the bramble leaves (I never get tired of ripping those off)
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Engraving on plastic, fron Fine Arts School time.
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"Angrod son of Finarfin was the first of the Exiles to come to Menegroth, as messenger of his brother Finrod..." (c) The Silmarillion, chap.13
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But when Tuor had lived thus in solitude as an outlaw for four years, Ulmo set it in his heart to depart from the land of his fathers, for he had chosen Tuor as the instrument of his designs; and leaving once more the caves of Androth he went westwards across Dor-lůmin. But even as dim dusk came on the third day of his journey, Tuor found before him a wall of rock, and there was an opening therein like a great arch; and the stream passed in and was lost. Then Tuor was dismayed, and he said: "So my hope has cheated me! The sign in the hills has led me only to dark end in the midst of the land of my enemies." But even as the light of the coming sun shone pale in the far mists of Mithrim, Tuor heard voices, and looking down he saw in amazement two Elves that waded in the shallow water. So he found Annon-in-Gelydh, the Gate of the Noldor, which the people of Turgon built when they dwelt in Nevrast long years before.
Thence a dark tunnel led beneath the mountains, and issued into Cirith Ninniach, the Rainbow Cleft, through which a turbulent water ran towards the western sea. The sun rose behind his back and set before his face, and where the water foamed among the boulders or rushed over sudden falls, at morning and evening rainbows were woven across the stream. High hills now marched on either side, and fresh waters spilled from them into Cirith Ninniach over shimmering falls. Then he lifted up his voice, and plucked the strings of his harp, and above the noise of the water the sound of his song and the sweet thrilling of the harp were echoed in the stone and multiplied.
And Tuor came into Nevrast, and looking upon Belegaer the Great Sea he was enamoured of it, and the sound of it and the longing for it were ever in his heart and ear, and an unquiet was on him that took him at last into the depths of the realms of Ulmo. Then he dwelt in Nevrast alone, and the summer of that year passed, and the doom of Nargothrond drew near; but when the autumn came he saw seven great swans flying south, and he knew them for a sign that he had tarried overlong, and he followed their flight along the shores of the sea.
The Silmarillion (chapter 23), The Unfinished Tales (Of Tuor and his Coming to Gondolin)


watercolor pencils, soft pastels

Second installment of the six-part series of illustrations for the story of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin (in the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales), which I drew last summer as a commission for certain Tolkien-fans.
It shows some important moments of Tuor's journey from Hithlum to Vinyamar. The upper panel shows the Gate of the Noldor, even as Gelmir and Arminas the two Noldorin messengers emerged from it. The main scene shows the Rainbow cleft with Tuor playing his harp. And then there are the seven swans, sent as a sign by Ulmo.
As for the heraldic devices, the two swan-wing are of course Tuor's again. The upper-right is the device of Finarfin (Gelmir and Arminas were of Finarfin's people). The lower-left is Fingolfin's, which is not so closely connected to this story, but the Gate of the Noldor (though built by Turgon) was made as the best way from Vinyamar to Fingolfin's realm and the device of Fingolfin is a good counterpart to that of Finarfin (also I like it so I wanted to have it included in one of the illustrations).

Part 1: Tuor in Hithlum
Part 3: In Vinyamar
Part 4: Coming to Gondolin
Part 5: The Fall of Gondolin
Part 6: A New Beginning

I hope you like it and I'll appreciate your comments. :-)

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If you like my Tolkien-related art, look at my related journal or gallery folder.
But you can find even more of my pictures on my website Angrenost.cz. It's in Czech, but you can still look at the gallery of illustrations. Enjoy! :-)
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"Great was the sorrow of Ešrendil and Elwing for the ruin of the havens of Sirion, and the captivity of their sons, and they feared that they would be slain; but it was not so. For Maglor took pity upon Elros and Elrond, and he cherished them, and love grew after between them, as little might be thought; but Maglor's heart was sick and weary with the burden of the dreadful oath."
(J.R.R. Tolkien "Silmarillion")

How did know Elros and Elrond the truth? Perhaps they accidentally heard the Noldolante.
On the wall some drawing from their childhood, and the lines on the jamb show, how much they grew during the years.

This is my entry for the Between the Lines contes. ([link])
2012.
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"Huan followed Celegorm into exile, and was faithful; and thus he too came under the doom of woe set upon the Noldor"
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Watercolors, 59 x 44 cm


A scene from J.R.R Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring - Chap. 8: Fog on the Barrow-downs".
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the sight of Maedhros' back.
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