Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Similar Deviations

The Hobbit. Jacksonised or: Pimp my Dwarf!

Journal Entry: Sat Dec 24, 2011, 2:56 AM
Updates


As I read the Hobbit to my son, as Smaug lies buried under the waters of the Long Lake and as Elves, Dwarves, Men and Orcs are drawn to the Lonely Mountain by greed, I stumble over promo photos of the Hobbit www.herr-der-ringe-film.de/v3/… and am reduced to disbelief.


Of course, I should have known. The target audience are the "Lotr" fans, the ones who have never read the books (probably tried, but gave up after "Concerning Hobbits"), who can't even be bothered to spell out the title of what they call their favourite book (or movie), who whooped with glee when Legolas surfed down the stairs of Helm's Deep on a shield or when Viggo, Orly and that alcoholic of a Dwarf kung-fu'd their way towards Théoden, and whom Jackson expects to be clamouring for more of the same in The Hobbit. He couldn't have made it a children's movie, no, of course not.

Thus, those lovable, squabbling Dwarves, who have only bread knives (which they lose soon enough after their encounter with the Orcs) and bows and arrows (which they waste shooting after black deer in Mirkwood), are portrayed as literally armed to the teeth. What do they need a burglar for? What do they need Bard for? They can just walk into the Lonely Mountain and bash Smaug on the head with that armoury of theirs, and all his jewel-encrusted armour won't avail him anything.

They don't even look like dwarves. They look as my first RPG game master always imagined them- heavily armed and armoured, grim creatures. Those are D&D Dwarves. They have nothing to do with Thorin and Company.

And Kili? I can already see the slash fic that'll be written about him. Screwing Fili at the Troll cave, in Rivendell (probably as a threesome with Elrond), and of course all the lovely bondage they'll be having with Legolas in the Elven-King's halls - whenever he can spare a moment between washing and conditionering his hair! Expecting the first fanfics in... less than three hours! Hey, those things are quickly written. And the fanart's going to beat Haldir.

Consider this: In the Lord of the Rings, Jackson gave us Frodo, Gandalf, Galadriel, Gollum, and a good handful of other characters exactly as we'd all seen them from the illustrators that had given us Tolkien illustrations for more than half a century. And we loved him for it. And he was confident enough in this to still give them to us like that, and not say, "Everyone sees Gandalf with a blue hat, long grey cloak, long beard and staff! Hey, I'll give him dreads, a full-plate armour and a shaven chin, just to prove how imaginative I am!"

But now he's gone and done exactly that.

Sorry, PJ... but NO. Leave a good book alone, and stay WAY clear of all that disgusting fan service.

I'm sure he'll have moments of greatness in between there, even moments of grandeur as he managed to put into the Lord of The Rings. I'll probably enjoy parts of the movie. I do love the Lord of the Rings movies (a few well-planned toilet breaks at strategic points in The Two Towers help), and when I saw the promo pictures for the Lord of the Rings movies over ten years ago, I was absolutely crazy with enthusiasm. So this is not a routine exercise in book-to-movie bashing.

I wonder what they'll do with the movie title in German. The book is known here as "Der Kleine Hobbit" (The Little Hobbit), and that will definitely not fit for the movie...

PS: Everyone who said that it was necessary to make the movie darker and the Dwarves less Disney please explain Nori and Ori to me. Especially Nori's hair...do. :O_o: www.herr-der-ringe-film.de/v3/…


Tutorials

:bulletblue: TRADITIONAL :bulletblue:
Watercolour Tutorial Part 1: Materials gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Watercolour Tutorial Part 2: Painting Basics gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Watercolour Tutorial Part 3: Tricks of the Trade gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Not a watercolour tutorial www.deviantart.com/deviation/2…
Watercolour steps gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Chainmail tutorial www.deviantart.com/deviation/2…

:bulletblue: DIGITAL :bulletblue:
NEW Photoshop tutorial gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
OLD Photoshop tutorial www.deviantart.com/deviation/3…
My OLD Watercolour/Photoshop technique www.goldseven.de/inhalt/walk/c…
Pimp my sketch! (Parchment technique) www.deviantart.com/deviation/2…








Friends
Great friends, great artists, great people:
:iconsaimain::iconpeet::iconuneide::iconelegaer::iconalice-bobbaji::iconthorbad:
:iconambroggio::iconchristiannauck::iconmissmatzenbatzen::iconunbemerkt::iconklausscherwinski::iconpuimun:
:iconflingling::iconkyena::iconmeredithdillman::icontrenchmaker::iconmelukilan::iconjanaschi:
:iconvyrhelle-vyrl::iconjuliedillon::iconorpheelin::icontoradh::icon3-hares::iconolivefoxx:



Tutorials

:bulletblue: TRADITIONAL :bulletblue:
Watercolour Tutorial Part 1: Materials gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Watercolour Tutorial Part 2: Painting Basics gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Watercolour Tutorial Part 3: Tricks of the Trade gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Not a watercolour tutorial www.deviantart.com/deviation/2…
Watercolour steps gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
Chainmail tutorial www.deviantart.com/deviation/2…

:bulletblue: DIGITAL :bulletblue:
NEW Photoshop tutorial gold-seven.deviantart.com/art/…
OLD Photoshop tutorial www.deviantart.com/deviation/3…
My OLD Watercolour/Photoshop technique www.goldseven.de/inhalt/walk/c…
Pimp my sketch! (Parchment technique) www.deviantart.com/deviation/2…








Friends
Great friends, great artists, great people:
:iconsaimain::iconpeet::iconuneide::iconelegaer::iconalice-bobbaji::iconthorbad:
:iconambroggio::iconchristiannauck::iconmissmatzenbatzen::iconunbemerkt::iconklausscherwinski::iconpuimun:
:iconflingling::iconkyena::iconmeredithdillman::icontrenchmaker::iconmelukilan::iconjanaschi:
:iconvyrhelle-vyrl::iconjuliedillon::iconorpheelin::icontoradh::icon3-hares::iconolivefoxx:


*CSS by BaB-Jane
*Brushes by Falln-Stock and redheadstock
  • Mood: Disgust
  • Listening to: Christmas CD
  • Reading: The Lord of the Rings
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Welcome to the Quenta Silmarillion, sit yourself down by the fire and hear the stories of old.

~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~

Remember of our Art Submission Guidelines silmarillion-club.deviantart.c…

~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~


Tolkien Illustrator’s First Aid Kit: Elves

Tolkien’s texts are notable for their abundance of characters, many of them mentioned perhaps only once, other playing very important parts in the stories. However, it is often very difficult to find any description of how those characters look, and this is what we, artists and illustrators, are usually most concerned with.:)
So here it is – Tolkien Illustrator’s First Aid Kit:woohoo: – a list of all those characters, whose physical appearance is mentioned in the texts, including The Silmarillion and The History of the Middle-earth.
To start with, the Elves. As we know, during the march from Cuiviënén they were divided into three hosts. Sindar were part of Teleri, so I decided to treat them along with them.

Vanyar:
The name referred to the hair of the Minyar, which was in nearly all members of the clan yellow or deep golden. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels: “Quendi and Eldar”

Noldor:
This <the golden hair of Vanyar> was regarded as a beautiful feature by the Noldor (who loved gold), though   they  were themselves mostly dark-haired. Owing to intermarriage the golden hair of the Vanyar sometimes later appeared among the Noldor: notably in the case of Finarfin, and in his children Finrod and Galadriel, in whom it came from King Finwë’s second wife, Indis of the Vanyar. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels: “Quendi and Eldar”
'They were tall, fair of skin and grey-eyed, though their locks were dark, save in the golden house of Finarfin. - J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth

Teleri:
The Sindar appear to have very closely resembled the Exiles, being dark-haired, strong and tall, but lithe. Indeed they could hardly be told apart except by their eyes; for the eyes of all the Elves that had dwelt in  Aman impressed  those of Middle-earth by their piercing brightness. For which reason the Sindar often called them Lachend, pl. Lechind 'flame-eyed'. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels, “Quendi and Eldar”
Elwe himself had long and beautiful hair of silver hue, but this does not seem to have been a common feature of the Sindar, though it was found among them occasionally especially in the nearer or remoter kin of Elwe (as in the case of Cirdan). – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels, “Quendi and Eldar”    

~*~*~*~*~*~
Now, the specific characters, in alphabetical order:

Aegnor:
But in early youth the fiery light could be observed; while his hair was notable: golden like his brothers and sister, but strong and stiff, rising upon his head like flames. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Ambarussa:
The twins remained alike, but the elder grew darker in hair – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”
First and last of Nerdanel's children had the reddish hair of her kin – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Aredhel:
Ar-Feiniel she was called, the White Lady of the Noldor, for she was pale though her hair was dark, and she was never arrayed but in silver and white. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 5: “Of Eldamar and the Princes of the Eldalië”
She was younger in the years of the Eldar than her brethren; and when she was grown to full stature and beauty she was greater and stronger than woman's wont (...) – J.R.R. Tolkien, Morgoth's Ring.

Argon:
Arakano was the tallest of  the brothers - J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Caranthir:
Carnistir 'red-face' - he was dark (brown) haired, but had the ruddy complexion of his mother.                – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”
Morifinwe 'dark' - he was black-haired as his grandfather. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Celegorm:
Then Celegorm arose amid  the throng  (p. 169).  In QS  this is  followed by 'golden was his long hair'. In the Lay at this point (line 1844) Celegorm has 'gleaming  hair'; his Old English name was Cynegrim Faegerfeax ('Fair-hair'), IV. 213. The phrase was removed in The Silmarillion text on account of the dark hair of the Noldorin princes other than in 'the golden house of Finarfin' (see I. 44); but he remains 'Celegorm the fair' in The Silmarillion p. 60. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lost Road and Other Writings: the Commentary to “On Beren and Tinúviel”

Círdan:
But this does not seem to have been a common feature of the Sindar, though it was found among them occasionally, especially in the nearer or remoter kin of Elwë (as in the case of Círdan) – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels: “Quendi and Eldar”
Very tall he was, and his beard was long, and he was grey and old, save that his eyes were keen as stars - J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, Chapter: “The Grey Havens”

Curufin:
Atarinke 'little father' - referring to his physical likeness to Feanor, later found to be also seen in his mind – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”
He also resembled Feanor very much in face – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Eärendil:
Now this babe was of greatest beauty; his skin of a shining white and his eyes of a blue surpassing that of the sky in southern lands - bluer than the sapphires of the raiment of Manwë – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Book of the Lost Tales II: “The Fall of Gondolin”
As both Idril and Tuor were fair-haired, we can guess, that their child also had golden hair.

Elrond:
The face of Elrond was ageless neither old nor young, though in it was written the memory of many things both glad and sorrowful. His hair was dark as the shadows of twilight, and upon it was set a circlet of silver; his eyes were grey as a clear evening, and in them was a light like the light of stars. Venerable he seemed as a king crowned with many winters, and yet hale as a tried warrior in the fullness of his strength. - J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, Chapter: “Many Meetings”
Please note: this is a description of Elrond in the Third Age. In the Second Age, in his youth, he would probably look a little different, as there would be not as much “memory of many things both glad and sorrowful”.

Elwë:
Elwe himself had long and beautiful hair of silver hue, – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels, “Quendi and Eldar”   
For fair and noble as he had been, now he appeared as it were a lord of the Maiar, tallest of all the Children of Iluvatar, his hair as grey silver, and his eyes like unto stars. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels: “The Grey Annals”
now he appeared as it were a lord of the Maiar, his hair as grey silver, tallest of all the Children of Ilúvatar – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 5: “Of Eldamar and the Princes of the Eldalië”

Eöl:
But Eöl, though stooped by his smithwork, was no Dwarf, but a tall Elf of a high kin of the Teleri, noble though grim of face; and his eyes could see deep into shadows and dark places. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 16: “Of Maeglin”

Fëanor:
He was tall, and fair of face, and masterful, his eyes piercingly bright and his hair raven-dark – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 6: “Of Fëanor and the Unchaining of Melkor”

Finarfin:
He was of his mother's kind in mind and body, having the golden hair of the Vanyar, their noble and gentle temper – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Finarfin’s children:
It was from  Finarfin's Vanyarin mother Indis that he, and Finrod Felagund and Galadriel his children, had their golden hair'- J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth, Note on an Unpublished Letter

Finduilas:
Finduilas ther Daughter of Orodreth was golden-haired after the manner of the house of Finarfin - J. R. R. Tolkien, Unfinished Tales, Appendix to Narn I Hîn Húrin.

Fingolfin:
Fingolfin was his father's son, tall, dark, and proud, as were most of the Noldor – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Fingon:
He wore his long dark hair in great plaits braided with gold. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”       

Finrod:
Finrod was like his father in his fair face and golden hair – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Finwë:
He had black hair, but brilliant grey-blue eyes. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: “The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Galadriel:
Galadriel, most beautiful of all the house of Finwë; her hair was lit with gold as though it had caught in a mesh the radiance of Laurelin – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 5: “Of Eldamar and the Princes of the Eldalië”

Her  mother-name  was  Nerwen  'man-maiden', and  she grew to be tall beyond the measure even of the women of the Noldor;… she was accounted beautiful, and her hair was held a marvel unmatched. It was golden like the hair of her father and her foremother Indis, but richer and more radiant, for its gold was touched by some memory of the star- like silver of her mother; and the Eldar said that the light of the Two Trees, Laurelin and Telperion, had been snared in her tresses – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”

Gil-Galad:
His sword was long, his lance was keen,
His shining helm afar was seen;
The countless stars of heaven’s field
Were mirrored in his silver shield
- J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, Chapter: “A Knife in the Dark”

Glorfindel:
Glorfindel was tall and straight; his hair was of shining gold, his face fair and young and fearless and full of joy; his eyes were bright and keen, and his voice like music; on his brow sat wisdom, and in his hand was strength. - J. R. R. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, Chapter “Many Meetings”

Idril:
But fairer   than   all   the   wonders   of   Gondolin  was   Idril  Turgon's daughter,  she  that  was  called  Celebrindal  the  Silver-foot  for  the whiteness  of  her  unshod  feet,  but  her  hair  was  as  the   gold  of Laurelin ere  the   coming  of   Melkor – J.R.R. Tolkien, The War of the Jewels, The Later Quenta Silmarillion: “Of Turgon and the Building of Gondolin”

Indis:
She was golden-haired, and tall,  and exceedingly swift of foot. – J.R.R. Tolkien, Morgoth’s Ring: “Of the Severance of Marriage”
She was a Vanya, close kin of Ingwë the High King, golden-haired and tall, and in all ways unlike Míriel. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 6: “Of Fëanor and the Unchaining of Melkor”

Lúthien:
Lúthien was the most beautiful of all the Children of Ilúvatar. Blue was her raiment as the unclouded heaven, but her eyes were grey as the starlit evening; her mantle was sewn with golden flowers, but her hair was dark as the shadows of twilight. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 19: “Of Beren and Lúthien”

Maedhros:
Maitimo  'well-shaped  one':  he  was of  beautiful bodily form. But he, and the youngest, inherited the rare red-brown hair of Nerdanel's kin. … So Maitimo had as an epesse given by his brothers and other kin Russandol 'copper-top' – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”
The eldest also wore a copper circlet. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: „The Shibboleth of Fëanor”     

Maeglin:
He was tall and black-haired; his eyes were dark, yet bright and keen as the eyes of the Noldor, and his skin was white. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, Chapter 16: “Of Maeglin”

Mahtan:
He usually  wore a band of copper about his head. His hair was not as dark or black as was that of most of the Noldor, but brown, and had glints of coppery-red in it - J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth, Notes to “The Shibboleth of Fëanor”
Elves did not have beards until they entered their third cycle of life. Nerdanel's father was exceptional, being only early in his second. - Vinyar Tengwar #41

Míriel:
Silver was her hair and dark were her eyes, but her hands were more skilled to fineness than any hands even of the Noldor. (...) Her hair was like silver; and she was slender as a white flower in the grass. Soft and sweet was her voice, and she sang as she worked, like rippling water, in music without words. – J.R.R. Tolkien, Morgoth’s Ring, The Later Quenta Silmarillion

Nerdanel:
She was not among the fairest of her people. But she was strong (…) – J.R.R. Tolkien, Morgoth’s Ring, The Later Quenta Silmarillion, “Of Fëanor and the Unchaining of Melkor”
'the  first and last of Nerdanel's children had the reddish hair of her  kin'- J.R.R. Tolkien, The Peoples of the Middle-earth: "The Shibboleth of Fëanor”.
(...) herself had brown hair and a ruddy complexion(VT41)

Olwë:
The hair of Olwë was long and white, and his eyes were blue– J.R.R. Tolkien, Morgoth's Ring, The Later Quenta Silmarillion: “Of the Coming of the Elves".

Voronwë:
Then the Elf turned and looked up, and Tuor met the piercing glance of his sea-grey eyes, and knew that he was of the high folk of the Noldor.- J. R. R. Tolkien, Unfinished Tales, “Of Tuor and his Coming to Gondolin”
As Noldor generally had dark hair, we can assume that Voronwë was no exception to this rule.


If you know any other descriptions, please let us now (comment below or send us a note), and we’ll add it to the list.:)

Edited by Breogán (28/4/12) & Sirielle (23/11/13)

~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~

The Silmarillion-Club is a group on deviantART centred around the early events from the world created by J. R. R. Tolkien: from the beginning of time up to the ending of the II Age of Sun, described in The Silmarillion, The Unfinished Tales, The Children of Húrin and The History of Middle-Earth
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Myths and Legends Across the World

Journal Entry: Fri May 27, 2011, 7:04 AM


Myths and legends are somewhere deep in the subconscious of every nation, often unique and wonderful tales, yet different from other stories - once they were alive. People lived with them, considered them true... and in a way, they are all true. They are a part of our heritage, and with every legend forgotten, something inside us dies. I wandered wide and far through dA to gather these tales. Sit down by the fire and listen…


Mesopotamia

Gilgamesh and His Last Acts by DaMaupin Gilgamesh vs Enkidu by DaMaupin Inanna by Lakandiwa The Death of Enkidu by MeteoDesigns Ishtar by SofiaNightwings

Egypt

Anubis and Ammut by Dracunnum He Who Balances by Hbruton At Edfu by Hbruton Anubis by silvestris Schemers: Set and Horus by blayrd Lord of All Growing Things by neffinesse Gods by Hbruton

Antique

Orpheus and Charon by llewllaw The Female Trinity by fanitsafantasy The champion of mankind by lucasalcantara Icarus falling by Amyhoi Demeter Goddess by midoriharada Moiras by shvayba Zeus by VargesPoseidon by GENZOMAN centaur by sandara Perseus and Andromeda by Himmapaan .: europa and the bull :. by xdragonflyx Hercules by wraithdt

Celtic

Caer Ibormeith by darktear83 Morrigane looks the Thiefeyes by Chonunhwa Kernunnos by Yannig-Germain BRIAN BORU by soys Macha by MoonSpiral Cu Chulainn by Crowsrock The Blood of Cuchulain by Ionus Horned God at the Solstice by Becka-Van-Filth The Death of Cuchulain by miss-a-r-t Deirdre agus Naoise by Breogan Claws in the Night by puimun

German and Viking (Edda)

Yggdrasil by fenix42death of balder-norse myth-Fmp by zombieprincess Death of a Viking by anubisreddeath Ride of the Valkyries by EvaKedves Art Trade - Tyr by MaverikElf The sons of Ivaldi by Hellanim The Death of Ymir by Elric888 Idun and Bragi by smolenskaya Norns by smolenskaya Valhalla by lemuren Loki by luisflores RAGNAROK by soys Thor - Odin and  Sleipnir by michaelkutsche Yggdrasil by pixieface

Finnish (Kalevala)

Heroes of Kalevala by jjnaas Vainamoinen ja Joukahainen by drandula In sauna by Laineilla Vainamoinen by lAhlbeck Kalevala Journal 12-13 by graffitihead Kalevala: The Fate Of Aino by sikuriina Kalevala: Son of Evil by nopsku

Russian:

Bogatyr by michalivan Slavonic mystery by smolenskaya Alkonost by Jo-Freyr Baba Yaga by MarkTarrisse The Alkonost by mashpotato18 Firebird by AnHellica

Slavic

Mora by DreddaBrutallac the Zlatarog by felixxkatt Morena brings death by zzen Perun and Yarovit by Righon Vodnik by Adrakitt Perunova dubrava by DuszanB :thumb119574513: :thumb109653200: Rusalka by Kaelycea Milosnice by DreddaBrutallac

India

Ganesh by SARYTH Vishnu, Lakshmi by zaradei shiva by CRYSTAL-2012 The Ramayana - Book 2 by mimezu The Prince Of Ayodhya by DennyKotian Mahabarata by dezygn Hanuman by kometani

China

Bridge of Wings - The Weaver by puimun Monkey King by SARYTH Hua Mulan by Veronica-Art dragonball by breathing2004 Fu Dragon by beastofoblivion On stage by phongduong Ten Suns by puimun Shenlong the rainbringer by VampirePrincess007

Ainu and Japan

Ainu Creation Story 1 by BigFaceReter-cikap-kamuy by jurithedreamerAmaterasu Hi by Lakandiwa Tanabata by AnHellica The Legend of Tokoyo by solangiana Amaterasu by GENZOMANFeathers and Arrows by MischievousMartian Amaterasu by Zephyri Kitsune by who-stole-MY-name

Other Asia:

Maligno by artstain The Adoration to The Lost Clan by rinaswan Seon-nyeo Pungcha by Lakandiwa Emperor Hung Vuong by splendidriver Machanu and Supanna Matcha by azrael1984 The Eleventh Full Moon by rinaswan

Africa

Africa vision by sabin-boykinov Detail2 African Creation myth by Nytlin Detail1 African Creation myth by Nytlin :thumb122225216: Heyoka by Loren86 Abatwa with Legend by WolfWhoSings

North America

Teachings of the Sweat Lodge by AaronPaquette White Buffalo Calf Woman by AaronPaquette Raven Kouth by Artkon72 TOTEM by Agarwen Raven Steals the Sun by EskimoScrybe Spirit by Zephyri Copperwoman by AaronPaquette

South and Central America

Mayan god: Hunab-Ku by XLordAndyX Mayan Myth - Goddess Ixchel by EmanuellaKozas My Gran Quetzalcoatl 2010 D. by rykyramirez Quezacoatl by Lakandiwa The Jaguar by TigerNinja The Rebirth of Seven Macaw by TempestErika Xolotl and Tonatiuh by graoww

Australia:

Legend of the Rainbow Serpent by screwbald Dreamtime by SkylaStarDreamer Australian dream time by AzureAngel2ihrs

Christian

Saint Joseph by Theophilia Mary by marianmalecki Archangel Michael by PaperCutIllustration Eden by wicked-vlad THE PROMISE by JoseRafaelCruzpagan ARMAGEDDON by artstainDelilah by leventepsalome by hishaSt.George and the Dragon by PaperCutIllustration

Medieval

Parsifal of RichardWagner by andrekosslick :thumb186271020: Forgotten Bells of Ys by puimun Joan of Arc by Michael-C-Hayes Lady of the Lake- Painting by Lamorien Tristan and Isolde by midoriharada The Seduction by puimun Excalibur by alanlathwell Unicorn 2- Heraldic by who-stole-MY-name Lady Godiva by feliciacano The Green Knight by LittleFrog626 the lady of lake by monicakuo Joan Of Arc- Juana de Arco by Giacobino Lohengrin - The Journey by alarie-tano Merlin and Arthur by alanlathwell The Fisher King by rainesz Robin Hood by JessiBeans

Later legends and fairy-tales:

PIPER by Sargiel Nisse or Tomte by neuromantiker Der Schimmelreiter by Gold-Seven Piper's Lullaby by Artgerm Scarlet Flower by Dolgopolov Troll and Valravn by humon The Kraken attacks by Chongo-zilla The Lorelei by orphicfiddler Rhinemaidens- Study of Rackham by Lamorien :thumb108689554: The Aspidochelone by DaemonReaper Lucky Leprechaun by mreach

Riversong Journal skin
Artwork by SnowSkadi
Design & coding by Grinmir-stock
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

T2HdWzXkhcXXXXXXXX !!44860672 by breathing2004
I am glad to announce the series of my LOTR stainglass art postcard is on sale in TaoBao shop
you can click the link below to buy.if you are in china you will be free mail if you buy more than 5 sets.
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

OH MY GOSH YOU GUYS. He's just AMAZING.

:iconcalculatus: This guy decided to make a breakdown of abilities of Blaze and Penn for me and there are some crazy stuff here!


Check it out!!!))


You gave us a few of Blaze's and Penn's abilities in the past but I decided that it wasn't good enough for me, so I fleshed their powers out some more by taking their skills and physical and spiritual properties of fire into account.

Blaze's powers


·Fire flows in his blood, making him immune to all foreign contaminants such as poison and disease.

                  o This would lead to regenerative healing factor since the flames would be constantly cauterizing his wounds. This is kind of like how phoenixes heal themselves.


Fire elementals are abnormally strong since fire spiritually represents strength.


·HEAT VISION!!!!


·He holds a symbiotic bond with fire, and can emit* it from his body through fire breath, explosions, flame armor, rocket-propelled flight, and temporarily transforming into a giant fire elemental like his mother.


·He is so talented at creating, controlling and becoming fire that he can phase through attacks.


·"Heat death": can cause the temperature of water or other internal fluid inside someone to rise dramatically, causing extreme pain, injury and very likely death. However, like Heat vision, this is extremely draining and really should only be used once before extended rest.

    

·He is capable of raising the temperature of molecules in objects, causing them to melt or evaporate.

    

·Depends on oxygen more than the average human, but does not need to drink. Dehydration is irrelevant.

    

·Able to create constructs, like shields and doors, from fire.

   

·A Fire elemental's power increases or decreases depending on the position of the sun in the sky, with their peak being Noon.

    

·talented enough in pyro-kinesis to superheat the air, creating an "air lens" to block off electricity and lightning

   

 ·By manipulating atoms in a different way he can create and control plasma and lightning. However these require concentration and peace of mind respectively.

 Penn's powers**

    

· Fire flows in his blood, making him immune to all foreign contaminants such as poison and disease.

        o This would lead to regenerative healing factor since the flames would be constantly cauterizing his wounds. This is kind of like how phoenixes heal themselves.

   

 ·Fire elementals are abnormally strong since fire spiritually represents strength.

    oPenn, however, inherited the Monstrous strength of Flame Queen. He is incredibly strong even among fire elementals

    

·He holds a symbiotic bond with fire, and can emit* it from his body through fire breath, explosions, flame armor, rocket-propelled flight, and temporarily transforming into a giant fire elemental like his mother.

    

·Penn draws strength, power and nourishment from his own rage.

    

·More skilled at swordsmanship than his brother.


·A Fire elemental's power increases or decreases depending on the position of the sun in the sky, with their peak being Noon.


·At least talented enough in pyro-kinesis to superheat the air, creating an "air lens" to block off electricity and lightning


·Though not good enough to create or control fire very well, he can still manipulate heat, like transferring heat from one object to another, and masking his own body heat.


·He CAN still cause Inflammation of the skin through his powers.


·Can FREEZE things by absorbing heat.


·Can dehydrate objects by blasting them with heat.


*It does not count as pyro-kinesis because it's not summoned from thin air, but rather channeled and expelled from their bodies.


**it should be assumed that, where flame control is concerned, Blaze can do everything his brother can.

You can choose any of these powers or all of them, and decide if they're innate or need to be figured out by them or if it just requires tons of training.

Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Books Are Back

Journal Entry: Sat Nov 30, 2013, 1:24 PM
books and things
Hardcovers, softcovers, calendars and other things are available again in the 4DE online store!



Notes on Character Design


I received the question pictured below at my tumblr blog.  In case it's useful to anyone here, I decided to go ahead and use this otherwise dormant journal to share the article I put together in response.


character design question


Character design and drawing are tome-sized topics and even if I had all the answers (I don't - I have a lot to learn), I'm not sure I could communicate them effectively. Here are some thoughts an ideas that might help, though.


First, some general things...

- Relax.
Let some of that anxiety go. This isn't a hard science. There's no wrong way, no rigid process you must adhere to, no shoulds or shouldn'ts except those you designate for yourself. This is one of the fun parts of being an artist, really - have a heady good time with it.

- Be patient.
A design is something gradually arrived at. It takes time and iteration and revision. You'll throw a lot of stuff away, and you'll inevitably get frustrated at times, but bear in mind the process is both inductive and deductive. Drawing the wrong things is part of the path toward drawing the right thing.

cat sketches

- Learn to draw.
It might seem perfunctory to say, but I'm not sure everyone's on the same page about what this means. Learning to draw isn't a sort of rote memorization process in which, one by one, you learn a recipe for humans, horses, pokemon, cars, etc. It's much more about learning to think like an artist, to develop the sort of spacial intelligence that lets you observe and effectively translate to paper, whatever the subject matter. When you're really learning to draw, you're learning to draw anything and everything. Observing and sketching trains you to understand dimension, form, gesture, mood, how anatomy works, economy of line; all of the foundational stuff you will also rely on to draw characters from your imagination. So, spend some time honing your drawing ability. Hone it with observational sketching. Hone it good.

  • I don't think I've ever seen anyone do this sort of thing better than Claire Wendling. In fact, character designs emerge almost seamlessly from her gestural sketches. It'd be worth looking her up.

- Gather inspiration like a crazed magpie.
What will ultimately be your trademark style and technique is a sort of snowball accumulation of the various things you expose yourself to, learn and draw influence from. To that effect, Google images, tumblr, pinterest and stock photo sites are your friends. When something tingles your artsy senses - a style, a shape, a texture, an appealing palette, a composition, a pose, a cool looking animal, a unique piece of apparel, whatever - grab it. Looking at a lot of material through a creative lens will make you a better artist the same way reading a lot of material makes a better writer.
It'll also devour your hard drive and you will try and fail many times to organize it, but more importantly, it'll give you a lovely library of ideas and motivational shinies to peruse when you're conjuring characters.

- Imitate.
It's a powerful learning tool. Probably for many of us, drawing popular cartoon characters was the gateway habit that lured us into the depraved world of character design to begin with. I wouldn't suggest limiting yourself to one style or neglecting your own inventions to do this, but it's an effective way to limber up, to get comfortable drawing characters in general, and to glean something from the thought processes of other artists.

- Use references.
Don't leave it all up to guessing. Whether you're trying to design something with realistic anatomy or something rather profoundly abstracted from reality, it's helpful in a multitude of ways to look at pictures. When designing characters, you can infer a lot personality from photos, too.
horse reference horses

And despite what you might have heard, having eyeballs and using them to look at things doesn't constitute cheating. There's no shame in reference material. There's at least a little shame in unintentional abstractions, though.

shame


Concepts and Approach:

- Break it down
Sometimes you have the look of a character fleshed out in your mind before putting it to paper, but usually not. That doesn't mean you have to blow your cortical fuses trying conceive multiple diverse designs all at the same time, though. You don't even have to design the body shape, poses, face, and expressions of a single character all at once. Tackle it a little at a time.

The cartoony, googly eyed style was pre-established for the simple mobile game goblin character below, but I still broke it into phases. Start with concepts, filter out what you like until you arrive at a look, experiment with colors, gestures and expressions.

Carl the goblin accountant cyber-monkey-death-bots


- Start with the general and work toward the specific.
Scribbling out scads of little thumbnails and silhouettes to capture an overall character shape is an effective way begin - it's like jotting down visual notes. When you're working at a small scale without agonizing over precision and details, there's no risk of having to toss out a bunch of hard work, so go nuts with it. Give yourself a lot of options.

Above sample silhouettes from an old cancelled project in which I was tasked with designing some kind of cyber monkey death bot. I scratched out some solid black shapes then refined some of them a step or two further.



Design:

- Shapes are language.
They come preloaded with all sorts of biological, cultural and personal connotations. They evoke certain things from us too. If you’re ever stuck about where to go with your design, employ a sort of anthroposcopy along these lines - make a visual free association game out of it. It’ll not only tend to result in a distinguished design, but a design that communicates something about the nature of the character.

Think about what you infer from different shapes. What do they remind you of? What personalities or attitudes come to mind? How does the mood of a soft curve differ from that of a sharp angle? With those attributes attached, how could they be used or incorporated into a body or facial feature shape? What happens when you combine shapes in complementary or contrasting ways? How does changing the weight distribution among a set of shapes affect look and feel? Experiment until a concept starts to resonate with the character you have in mind or until you stumble on something you like.

Lucky Charms rejects


If you don’t have intent, take the opposite approach - draw some shapes and see where they go. (It’s stupid fun.)

monster shapes


- Cohesion and Style.
As you move from thumbnails to more refined drawings, you can start extrapolating details from the general form. Look for defining shapes, emergent themes or patterns and tease them out further, repeat them, mirror them, alternate them. Make the character entirely out of boxy shapes, incorporate multiple elements of an architectural style, use rhythmically varying line weights - there are a million ways to do this

Here's some of the simple shape repetition I've used for Lackadaisy characters.

And for potato shaped characters, use potato shaped shapes.

- Expressions.
Let them emerge from your design. If your various characters have distinguishing features, the expressions they make with those features will distinguish them further. Allow personality to influence expressions too, or vice versa. Often, a bit of both happens as you continue drawing - physiognomy and personality converge somewhere in the middle.

For instance, Viktor’s head is proportioned a little like a big cat. Befitting his personality, his design lets him make rather bestial expressions. Rocky, with his flair for drama, has a bit more cartoon about him. His expressions are more elastic, his cheeks squish and deform and his big eyebrows push the boundaries of his forehead. Mitzi is gentler all around with altogether fewer lines on her face. The combination of her large sleepy eyes and pencil line brow looked a little sad and a little condescending to me when I began working out her design - ultimately those aspects became incorporated into her personality.

expressions


I discuss expression drawing in more detail here (click the image for the link):

expressions

- Poses.
Rendering poses is another one of those things for which observational/gesture drawing comes in handy. Even if you’re essentially scribbling stick figures, you can get a handle on natural looking, communicative poses this way. Stick figure poses make excellent guidelines for plotting out full fledged character drawings too.

Look for the line of action. It’ll be easiest to identify in poses with motions, gestures and moods that are immediately decipherable. When you’ve learned to spot it, you can start reverse engineering your own poses around it.

line of action

- Additional resources.
Here are some related things about drawing poses and constructing characters (click the images for the links).

expressions


expressions


Lastly…

Tortured rumination about lack of ability/style/progress is a near universal state of creative affairs. Every artist I have known and worked with falls somewhere on a spectrum between frustration in perpetuity and a shade of fierce ongoing contrition that'd make Arthur Dimmesdale wince. So, next time you find yourself constructing a scourge out of all those crusty acrylic brushes you failed to clean properly, you loathsome, deluded hack, you, at least remember you’re not alone in feeling that way. When it’s not crushing the will to live out of you, the device does have its uses - it keeps you self-critical and locked in working to improve mode. If we were all quite satisfied with our output, I suppose we’d be out of reasons to try harder next time.

When you need some reassurance, compare old work to new. Evolution is gradual and difficult to perceive if you’re narrowed in on the nearest data point, but if you’ve been steadily working on characters for a few months or a year, you’ll likely see a favorable difference between points A and B.

Most of all, don’t dwell on achieving some sort of endgame in which you’re finally there as a character artist. There’s no such place - wherever you are, there is somewhere else. It’s a moving goal post. Your energy will be better spent just enjoying the process…and that much will show in the results.

Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.









"Scars can come in handy. I have one myself above my left knee that is a perfect map of the London Underground."—Prof. Albus Dumbledore


Early life becomes an exploration of invisible parameters, circles beyond circles, as one pushes out to test the boundaries of safety. There is one’s bedroom, one’s home, neighborhood, school and town, state and nation. Early on, maps become important documents – declarations of being and rights and privileges. In the art world, throughout history, maps have been a constant measure of human progress, from the Phoenecians recording their trade routes over 2000 years ago, or pre-Columbian times in which maps pictured the world as a flat chessboard balanced atop huge elephants or whales, the oceans spilling over the edges as waterfalls in infinite space – to the latest details of the surface of Mars, courtesy of the Curiosity probe. There’s something beyond the purely practical in always knowing where you’re at, look no further the mania of checking in with digital GPS devices. Somehow, just knowing you have a map in your pocket to guide you, maybe even one that speaks to you is a kind of a liberating power over the common frustrations of life.







The opening credits of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” features a massive raised relief map of the series’ warring kingdoms. In genre fiction, maps of the mythic lands in which the stories take place have always been a special enjoyment. From finding the Garden of Eden, to elaborate maps guiding Indy on his quest for the Holy Grail, or the map of “Hyborian Times” sketched out by Robert E. Howard to better immerse you in the wanderings of his barbarian hero Conan, storytellers have always known that there’s something about the “authentification” of seeing a map that can make even the most dubious quest seem real.



Mythical Maps are currently enjoying a resurgence in our favorite videogames, detailed 3D virtual "maps" upon which the mayhem of Call of Duty, Skyrim, and Gears of War are played out, are things of wonder in and of themselves. The DLC cry of “new maps” has become the call that new magical killing fields are at the ready to be tested for their vicarious thrill-potential. Where once explorers sought out maps to the Fountain of Youth or the gold-paved streets of El Dorado, today’s adventurers seek out the perfect multiplayer map.







Let us celebrate the imagination of our mythic mapmakers on deviantART.


From our shared common knowledge of the islands and coves within Peter's Neverland, to the navigation of the Dothraki Sea, to the celestial cartography of hidden maps to unknown worlds within the stars above us, mythical maps have carved out a space for themselves right along side, and just as important as, the maps based on a “knowable” earth. The importance of a map to any fantasy story reader is the key, the literal base anchoring the fantasy, to be referred to over and over again as a story unfolds. So much background information, and so much added story texture, can be conveyed to a reader through the art of a carefully thought out and executed map.


A small part in each of us is the sense of where we are not only physically but psychically and spiritually. Whether real or not, a great map tells a great story. One could argue that a masterful cartographer must be a skilled storyteller as well. As we create our mental maps of the fantasy realms we prefer to inhabit as part of our existence in the sometimes mundane world, let us celebrate the imagination of our mythic mapmakers on deviantART.


















QuestionsFor the Reader


  1. What’s your favorite map of a fictional land?
  2. Do you think the increasing similarity of “cosmic” maps as created for videogames and superhero movies is dulling our collective sense for adventure?
  3. Which videogame maps do the best job of totally immersing you in another world?
  4. Is there an actual map hanging anywhere in your home, and what is it of?









One's geographical sense of place within the world is one of childhood's important components of that inner puzzle that contributes to ones sense of identity.Early life becomes an exploration of invisible parameters, circles beyond circles, as one pushes out to test the boundaries of safety. There is one's bedroom, one's home, neighborhood, school and town, state and nation. Early on, maps become important documents – declarations of being and rights and privileges. In the art world, throughout history, maps have been a constant measure of human progress, from the Phoenecians recording their trade routes over 2000 years ago, or pre-Columbian times in which maps pictured the world as a flat chessboard balanced atop huge elephants or whales, the oceans spilling over the edges as waterfalls in infinite space – to the latest details of the surface of Mars, courtesy of the Curiosity probe.

Writers: techgnotic
Designers: marioluevanos

For more article like this, visit depthRADIUS
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.









A magic of effective art can be a drawing that appears to be a movie still, clipped from a film narrative, evoking a powerful sense of storytelling— and the viewer wants to know the rest of the story. This phenomenon has recently manifested itself on deviantART— and in a big way— once again.





Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson will produce a movie based on a drawing (“sweet Halloween dreams”) by deviantART digital artist begemott. The drawing depicts a tiny teddy bear with a tiny wooden sword and shield defending a sleeping child from the advances of a hideous beast sprung from the child’s nightmare.







The drawing was spotted on deviantART and brought to the attention of The Rock, film company, New Line, and the production company that produced The Rock’s successful movie “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island.













Begemott’s gallery is full of wildly imaginative art works... We want to become a part of that world and find out what happens next.














Begemott’s gallery is full of wildly imaginative art works that succeed in capturing the moment in an idea’s “story” that represents a portal into a separate world. We want to become a part of that world and find out what happens next. Almost any of the images from this artist’s gallery could serve as a more interesting story platform than the mostly stale stories released every Friday in our movie theaters. So what at first blush might seem a bit crazy— constructing an entire film narrative from a single artist’s image— becomes much more understandable.











Even within short viewings, the striking and evocative story possibilities of begemott’s artworks spark the imagination. But so many of these paintings deserve longer viewing sessions offering even greater reward by allowing the constructed tableau to percolate and truly come to life. Sensing the dilemma these characters are facing becomes the core focus when viewing these works. Empathy for the subject and situations and the just occurred events comes easily as the scenes unfold and the characters’ relationships with themselves and others become clear. These newly familiar characters exude more identity and personality than the scripted clichés populating too many a screenplay.


The creativity, imagination and resonance with seekers of art that is always next-level, delightfully wicked and yet thoroughly human, always the portal moment of a story we want to enter, is what makes begemott’s art so special. And as a moment of captured “living narrative” his work is drawing in those in the entertainment businesses charged with finding life buried in the stacks of deadheaded old-thought pitches and submissions.


















DeviantART's great proletarian aesthetic is infusing media. Presented for your consideration: the likeness of a central character in Bioshock Infinite was sourced from a prominent cosplayer on deviantART, ormeli; and the recent suggestion by a snarky critic that the key art poster for The Great and Powerful Oz must have been made by a “14 year old on deviantART”— it certainly reflects deviantART because that’s what the world wants to see.


This community is the dominant aesthetic.

















DeviantART is becoming known as the place to come to, where the imagination for the new millennium and the new narrative spaces of the Internet are to be found. And begemott is the newest example of the narratives being discovered here.


Deviants should be made aware that this phenomenon of Hollywood finding movie ideas in the galleries of deviantARTists is not novel. This community’s impact on the aesthetic and narratives of all media is substantial and constant though frequently invisible. This event is distinguished by the high profile acknowledgement of the artist and of deviantART as the source of his work.




















Interviewwith begemott










techgnotic:
How integral was your network of friends and watchers on dA in the “discovery” of this artwork?


begemott:
I think it was crucial. It is only a guess, since I cannot know the people who posted the image on reddit and facebook, but I would expect that it started from people watching me on dA. Same for the people who posted links to my page in comments when the image appeared without attribution. I'm very thankful to them.









techgnotic:
With so many screenplays competing for the attention of movie producers, how surprised were you that your drawing was chosen as the basis for a feature film?


begemott:
It was very unexpected. I guess it shows how social media are changing the landscape. I think that recently another movie project was based on comments on a thread in reddit. It is certainly exciting to have such opportunities offered to outsiders. I would guess that one attractive property of picking up an idea from the internet, is that it has already received feedback from people.










techgnotic:
What do you think it was about your drawing that so intrigued a producer looking for a unique story to tell?


begemott:
I think that the drawing implies a larger story, and it's probably easy to relate to. The night is scary when you are a kid, and I'm sure many children have comforted themselves by imagining that something in the room protected them from all the imaginary dangers in the dark.










techgnotic:
There are so many elements balanced in your simple piece – childhood fear and wonder, heroism and loyalty, the safety and the terror of one’s own bed. Do you spend a lot of time thinking about achieving desired balances or effects, or do you just construct “story narrative platforms” instinctively? What can you tell us about your process?


begemott:
I try hard not to think! When I do try to think about such things explicitly, it all goes wrong. I don't have a process as such. What usually happens is that at some point, usually late at night, often after listening to music for a long time, I have an idea, and I make a quick sketch on a piece of paper to remember. These quick sketches are very rough and probably totally incomprehensible to others. At some other time, when I have time to spare, I go through these sketches, find one that seems like it's worth the effort, and finish it.












techgnotic:
Have you been approached by Hollywood about obtaining film rights to your other artworks?


begemott:
No.




techgnotic:
Can you share with us your preferred tools when creating your artworks?


begemott:
I usually draw with a mechanical pencil on plain paper. When I want more detail, I may use larger Bristol paper. I then scan it and do the coloring on the computer using a Wacom pen.






techgnotic:
There is an ongoing rash of movies “updating” classic fairy tales that all seem to fail by losing all sense of childhood as adult themes are added to the mix. Do you think the “Rock” might succeed in creating a gem like “Time Bandits” amidst the current mishmash affairs like “Snow White and the Huntsman?”


begemott:
I don't really know much about the movie. I will not be part of the creative process, but I certainly hope the end result will be enjoyable. I don't think that adult themes are necessarily a bad thing in a child story. I think that the problem is that in many recent movies revisiting fairy tales, the adult themes are simplistic and inserted in a forceful and explicit way. On the other hand, many good child stories have real underlying adult themes, without losing their magic.

















Questionsfor the reader







1.

Is there a particular artwork, or an artist’s work in general, in which you notice this “moment from an unwritten story” phenomenon?




2.

Have you ever been intrigued enough by a “narrative moment” artwork on dA to ask the artist in a comment to tell the rest of the story? Would you like to do that?




3.

Do you think the Hollywood studio trend in seeking more imaginative narratives in dA’s “unwritten stories” will increase?




4.

Is this because audiences in the Internet age in general are demanding more full spectrum or multifaceted platforms for their narrative entertainment?













A magic of effective art can be a drawing that appears to be a movie still, clipped from a film narrative, evoking a powerful sense of storytelling— and the viewer wants to know the rest of the story. This phenomenon has recently manifested itself on deviantART— and in a big way— once again.

Writers: $techgnotic
Designers: $marioluevanos
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

Bloody Crowns, Diaphanous Gowns

Thu Jun 12, 2014, 7:00 PM











The current popularity of the bloody and salacious Game of Thrones and a host of paler imitators may have roots in Cate Blanchett’s Oscar-worthy performance as the historical Elizabeth (1998), the Queen who was perhaps the most important ruling Royal, King or Queen, in British history.







The politics and imputed romances of her reign embroiled both her throne and bedchambers. Released from her half-sister’s dungeon to go on to successfully stabilize a country wracked by religious war, all the while being threatened by Spanish invasion from without and overthrow by the plots of her male “suitors” from within, her life was epic and an intimate human drama rarely captured in fiction.


Then the British import The Tudors (2007–10), brought us an updated lusty beautiful/horrifying portrayal of King Henry VIII, this time focusing on the athleticism of his youth—before he was gravely injured (crushed under a horse while jousting) and became the iconic morbidly obese figure we’re more familiar with.



The Tudors casting of the svelte and smolderingly sexual Jonathan Rhys Meyers (as well as the alluring Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn) marks one of those important departures from the collective story we all carry in our heads, created from childhood on through college and beyond. We call this general narrative “history.” We become incensed over what we feel are profane depictions of our heroes and their beliefs and intentions—as if we could ever know what roiled the mind of a monarch in 1532. Protestants are understandably upset when the Reformation is de-emphasized as “back story,” the better to focus on a King maneuvering wickedly and recklessly in order to secure a divorce both secularly legal and religiously Hell-free, the better to pursue the super hot girl of his dreams.


There is Jeremy Irons in The Borgias as Pope Alexander VI in the late 15th Century committing every possible sin and debauchery that moderns minds could project or imagine for any man of power, much less a Pope surrounded by a family and College of Cardinals just as ruthless with privilege and wealth. Watching this re-casting of the past you need to pinch yourself to remember that the action is set within the Roman Catholic Church which was then and apparently still may be a political and social quagmire. The critics favor a modern French production of this story, Borgias, where they cavort and garrote in the same fashion. This version’s episodes are still in production.
















The Nixon Presidency (1969-74) has long been held in the collective American consciousness as the high-level mark in Presidential criminality. But only fringe conspiracy theorists believe that the Nixon ninjas actually murdered political opponents and witnesses. Yet that’s currently accepted as “believable” plotting in popular dramas like Scandal and especially the American remake of House of Cards, in which Kevin Spacey’s deranged politician, Frank Underwood, has no problem with assassination as a method to attain his vengeance and promote his personal advance.


And that’s what it is all about on these current shows: politics as a means to personal revenge, enrichment, and power for sheer power’s sake. The good ol’ days of Henry’s romancing of Anne, let the world burn, seem naïve now.




Do viewers really accept this current storytelling as credible, that this stuff is really going on in the White House, in the royal court of the Tudors or at the Vatican or is this just “political science fiction” grounded in reality but played out into another world altogether?




Game of Thrones, adapted from a series of novels still being completed by fantasy writer George R.R. Martin, might just be the craziest-ever mash-up of wildly divergent time periods, some actual historical events, dragons, mysticism, warring Kingdoms of tangled bloodlines, political marriages, incest among the nobles all soaked in the blood of a thousand traitorous sword-thrusts and festooned with heaving bosoms in (and often out of) designer silks and satins. The interior and architectural decoration of the times of this tale seems to have been informed equally by combinations of ancient Babylon, Egyptian archeology, Conan the Barbarian and Victoria’s Secret. Ruminations by grizzled older warriors trudging toward the next battle touch upon the great themes of crime & punishment, political corruption, religion, loyalty and true brotherhood—but never rise above standard wooly maxims. Never has so much superlative acting and massive production value been expended on comic book level human drama.


















“Thrones” is a new extension of Hollywood storytelling nonsense with every scene crafted to push my buttons in some pleasurably cathartic manner.







Worries over what conservative or liberal or sexist or pro—or anti-gay messaging is going on here must be laid aside as there is no algorithm detailed enough to explain what any of this story really “means.” It really is just a “game” to be won or lost by its ever-shifting rules. Being naked in its intent to be no more than sheer entertainment makes the series immune from serious academic, philosophic, historical or literary criticism. Game of Thrones frees us to enjoy it for what it is: a feast for the senses on the way to the next big lunatic lunge on the narrative rollercoaster. A sampling of tributes to the show as imagined by its many deviant fans is a testament to what will go down as one of the most marvelous box of chocolates one could ever hope to have opened. It’s undoubtedly not good for us—but it’s just oh, so good.


I wait every Sunday here in Los Angeles, attending screening parties when I can, for this glorious, masterfully crafted, and richly creative tour de force which acts as a deliciously sweet nightcap after another in an endless series of 80 hour work weeks.


How about you?
















withWilliam Simpson






1.



What is the most important information that needs to be expressed on storyboards at this point in production?  This information usually flows from who (director/editor) to whom (set designer, etc)?





William Simpson:

In prep, the storyboards are full of the essential camera movements and green screen CGI elements. As always, Storytelling is the essential element, something that will be understood by the various departments, from Director of Photography and the camera dept, through the VFX green screen CGI dept for visual composites through to producers, determining what can be afforded to be shot.


I work directly with the director, interpreting his/her ideas, and sometimes with the line producer, working out the logic of the storytelling to give us a 'heads up' as to what may cause problems for the actual shoot.


The information flow, is usually from Director, to me, then on to production, before they distribute the sequences to all others who may need them.









2.



Is there much "pre-editing" being done in the sequencing and layout of scenes?  And if so, what is usually being emphasized by directors, editors and others in their input?





William Simpson:

There's quite a bit of pre-editing being achieved in the sequences, the process enabling a ' nailing down' of shots, especially for the cost constraints. Part of what we determine in prep, is what is logical and artistic to film, and then combine it with the shot list allowance of what we feasibly can actually have, What can be practical live filming, and what has to be an VFX shot.










Bio



William Simpson is an international artist, whose career began in comicstrip art, working on a range of character icons: Judge Dredd, Rogue Trooper, Batman, Transformers, Hellblazer, Tyranny Rex, Aliens, and Vamps. Now he's primarily in movies.


In recent years he has developed his work in the film industry providing conceptual art and storyboards for a variety of feature films, such as: Reign of Fire, directed by Rob Bowman, Freeze Frame, directed by John Simpson, Neil Jordan's Breakfast on Pluto, and most recently, Game of Thrones for HBO, David Gordon Green and Danny McBride's Your Highness for Universal, Lord Richard Attenborough's 2006 production, Closing The Ring and the Tom Hanks produced, City Of Ember. Currently on Game of Thrones for HBO.












3.



Is there a tremendous amount of detail on storyboards on a big production like Game of Thrones that wouldn't exist with a more modest production—or is the functionality of deciding how a narrative is going to be told the key consideration always in any production?





William Simpson:

I think functionality of narrative is pretty essential, but, there's a lot of storytelling, good directors know, and don't need to be visualised in a board first, but on a show like Game of Thrones, the details in what will have to have CGI elements, a primary concern for compositing real with unreal. We’re creating Westeros here, and we have to see what can be achieved by drawing it first. It must be considered worthwhile as I've been there for 5 years already.









4.



Is there a special feeling you get from being so deeply involved in the internal "DNA" of what is obviously going to be an important landmark series?





William Simpson:

I think the delight is in watching so much of what you've done, realised on screen. Game of Thrones is a vast production and requires quite a lot of prep over the ten episodes in a season, and so many drawn sequences turned into film footage is always a buzz. It's definitely great to be an essential part of fandom's fav series.











We’re creating Westeros here, and we have to see what can be achieved by drawing it first.













5.



How did you come to get your job doing storyboards for Game of Thrones? Is this the usual pathway to being considered for such jobs, or are there others for interested deviants to pursue? What can you tell artists who want to do storyboarding as a dream job?  What should they be doing?





William Simpson:

This is a really big question and there is a massively convoluted answer to it. You see, there's a lot of being in the right place at the right time, and having 20 years of comic strip experience doesn't hurt!


I was brought in to do some concepts, while I was working on Your Highness. I wasn't told what the project was, just given a few key pages of script, and asked could I come up with some castle images and knights and a few interesting location shots, one being the beheading scene at the beginning of the story. These images were then sent in a package to HBO, and they seemed to help them decide on coming to N.Ireland to film with their production base. When I was told we had the series, while still on Your Highness I asked my producer friend Mark Huffam, " do I have a job then" haha, to which he said "of course".











I asked my producer friend Mark Huffam, “do I have a job then” haha, to which he said “of course.”
















William Simpson:

After I finished my concept art on "Your Highness" ad did a day of 2nd unit directing for it, I then moved on into Game of Thrones and started conceptualising weaponry. I created the designs for all the hero weapons, at that time, 'Ice', 'Needle', 'long claw', etc, were mine, as well as developing the very first set of images of the "White Walkers", "The Godswood Tree", "Cersei's" carriage, and "The Three Eyed Ravens". I helped on some of the armour and helmet elements for Costume. I did a pretty neat version of the 'Hound', pretty close to what was made. After that, I went on to Storyboarding.


The comic side of me has generated a diverse artist, so having been recognised as such, I was used properly to generate ideas in the beginning. I've since storyboarded all four seasons, and will be getting into the fifth, coming this year.


It's not been the usual pathway, but then I don't think there actually is a 'usual'. Sometimes, I pitch myself at films, if I know in advance they're happening, though now, most of my time, I'm called up and asked, when am I available. It's nice when you get a call, which has a value on what you do as an artist with experience.


For anybody wanting to do any form of art, including storyboarding, you have to be in love with drawing, and storytelling. You have to have a perverse nature that allows you to work long hours drawing as a job, and then finding yourself also drawing for fun. You have to love this pursuit. No half measures. I try to bring all the sensitivity I had in comic strips, into what I do in storyboarding, though some may do it as a job, I tend to come at it as a solver of problems in storytelling and somebody who says, 'great, I'm going to be drawing all day!' No fear! It's another great mode of self expression.











For anybody wanting to do any form of art... You have to love this pursuit. No half measures.















For The Reader





1.

Would you assign world class literary and philosophical value to Game of Thrones?  If so, why?




2.

Is there an unspoken “agreement” between film producer and film consumer as to the intended “pure entertainment” vs. “think” purpose of a film experience?




3.

Are you annoyed when historical figures are portrayed in ways that greatly diverge from the picture of them you have always had in your head?  Or do you find this refreshing and creative, even if involving massive “poetic license?”




4.

Do you think moviemakers have a duty to portray historical figures as they were, or is it enough that their life events are accurately recorded, as well as their beliefs and words.  Is it OK to cast Peter O’Toole as Lawrence of Arabia when the real Lawrence was only 5 feet tall?  Is it OK to give the young Henry VIII six-pack abs?




5.

Do you think fantasy and science fiction stories should steer clear of politics generally and stick to common human questions of love, loyalty, valor as motivators for characters?  Does the feeling that the author is subtly pushing his or her political or social beliefs on the reader, no matter how delicately, a turn-off for you?  Or is this something writers should never hide in their art?




6.

Do you think all the elements of Game of Thrones that could be found by individual viewers to be offensive, sexist, racist, homophobic, pro-violence, are “forgiven” by the utter outrageousness of the story in general?  Should there always be a place for politically incorrect fun?











The current popularity of the bloody and salacious Game of Thrones and a host of paler imitators may have roots in Cate Blanchett’s Oscar-worthy performance as the historical Elizabeth (1998), the Queen who was perhaps the most important ruling Royal, King or Queen, in British history. The politics and imputed romances of her reign embroiled both her throne and bedchambers. Released from her half-sister’s dungeon to go on to successfully stabilize a country wracked by religious war, all the while being threatened by Spanish invasion from without and overthrow by the plots of her male “suitors” from within, her life was epic and an intimate human drama rarely captured in fiction.

Writers: techgnotic 
Designers: marioluevanos 

For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

You're Not Alone

Tue Dec 24, 2013, 11:43 AM







“Sometimes we lay aside our own troubles when we wipe away another's tears.”
—Seneca















Apart...


Is no longer alone


T

his life is not easy; a winding, sometimes whimsical, sometimes tragic journey that ultimately finds terminus in the same common destination for each of us. No matter the brave, fierce constructs we build and serve that would have us believe we are each one of us all alone as we make this journey, we make our way toward the end of all things side-by-side in our community of the living each day defying death.  Our paths may be wildly divergent—the way of the hungry and impoverished traveling the same timeline with the grotesquely indulgent, the very best of us side-by-side with the most evil of us; but all headed for the same fate: dust. Every one hundred years or so, tribes of all new people roam the Earthsphere, trying to figure it out one more time from the handful of clues, many just recycled, left by those having come and gone before.







Until there were written records, the clues were all visual; a handprint on a cave wall and then a foot cast in dried silica turned to fossil; maybe a drawing of an animal; maybe a group of stones that is now incomprehensible but undeniably sculptural. Only recently do we humans use writing at all or keep things in books. Museums are only a couple of hundred years old.  Public ones are mostly younger than a hundred.  And now we collect clues in digits in quantities and scope unparalleled in the past with the vain glorious hope that our collective records will last for all ages and transmit out to other universes; when of course the reality may be that a single electrical blip, perhaps a sizeable solar flare, could wipe those digits clean in an instant.  It is the here and now that matters. It is the collection in front of our eyes that draws meaning. It is the art you make now that expresses your soul and reflects all that has come before worth knowing and projects forward all that will be forever.







It has always been easy to imagine ourselves, and truly believe ourselves, to be all alone in our journey through life.  For some of us this perceived loneliness is too much for a human being to bear, especially at the Holidays. But this cannot be.


In this new millennium, the spirit of the cyber-Magi, ghosts riding the world web, have brought us a gift of connectivity and global community such has never existed before.  The phantom of aloneness is finally disintegrating and blowing away amidst wave after wave of millions upon millions of web citizens linking with each other.








Communities like deviantART and others that have formed with the advent of the web have suddenly given us the opportunity to move past the confines of our own geographical “villages” and allowed a connection and sometimes, more aptly, a collision, of diverse humanity to connect and jack in to the collective Anima Mundi.


We feel alone with our personal problems, secrets, burdens, and self-destructive obstructive thoughts—suffocating thoughts that sometimes seem to be slowly killing the soul. Such are our thoughts of absolute isolation when confronting our hidden things that are too much for one person to handle.








But sharing our pain begins our healing.


And beyond that: Shared pain often leads to shared healing.








I have read so many deeply moving journals over the years with story after story of support and friendship both on the site between artists of every stage of development and off site between friends, colleagues, lovers, co-workers, activists, and everything in between. Deeply important connections shared with each other sparked by an initial passion for art years before. The deviantART community has proven to me again and again that at core it operates on a currency of love—love for art and love for other community members.








Since finding the deviantART community I have made friends and shared burdens with people on deviantART that were not shared in real life. Many burdens require just such a community of others who have endured similar fire or experiences, as they sometimes are the only healing waters that can extinguish tormenting flames. At some point I will write about my experience and I will share pivotal moments of peace I found at critical junctures through connecting with others around the world within the deviantART community. It should be no surprise that the deviantART community should provide such a source of regenerative person-to-person healing.







Many online communities are capable of providing loving curative support to worldwide members. But deviantART, for me, with the message of the special powers of ART at its core, is a massive supernova-strength engine for global as well as personal peer-to-peer communication and healing. The very idea, intention, comprehension, gift, and nature of art can be a powerful form of communal and personal healing. A community of millions with an art intention can heal multitudes.









Don’t believe the depressing hype.




It may just be you all by your lonesome, warming your bones by your fireplace yule log (or like me renting a video of a fireplace and watching it burn and flicker on a TV set), as the snow piles up outside… But you are not alone. If you are reading this Holiday Message it means that you have 24/7 access and instantaneous worldwide reach at your fingertips.






We’re on our way into 2014—and we’re going in shoulder-to-shoulder, side-by-side, connected and jacked into our worldwide community’s future.






The sum of our Karma will one day free the Universe (so enough with the too-hip-for-the-room grumpy Scrooge vibe).




Onward, to the next artful steps on our path.


















  1. Have you ever had a secret you feared would alienate your friends, but only strengthened your friendship when it was revealed?

  2. Do the holidays make you want to retreat or explode?

  3. Are the arts or the making of art a pathway to getting you through tough times?

  4. How have you used the deviantART community to connect during the holidays?








This holiday season, it can be easy to feel an ineffable disconnect for any multitude of reasons. But if the thriving and ever-growing community of deviantART can give you one gift this year, it's the knowledge that you are not alone. Let art and community into your soul for an inspirational dose of healing whenever you may need it.

Writers: $techgnotic
Designers: $marioluevanos
Show
Add a Comment:
 
No comments have been added yet.

End of Results