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Similar Deviations
I wasn't feeling too happy with some of those villain drawings I uploaded the other day, so I decided to take another stab at it. Just some more character design brainstorming mainly done to keep me drawing while working on 3d stuff.
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This is the clean up of my character design assignment for class. Our assignment was to create an anthropomorphic character and show them at 5 different stages in life (baby, child, teenager, adult, and senior). I had a lot of fun working with this one, partly because I got the chance to colour it and also because I got to make a character out of my favorite animal.

If you have any constructive comments please let me know, don't be afraid to criticize. I'd like it to look it's best when I hand it in.
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I realize I haven't posted much lately, mostly because I've been focusing on computer animation practice and life drawing in my sketchbook. Anyway, to keep this blog alive until I can upload some animation work, I've illustrated a drawing from my sketchbook.

I'm also trying out a digital signature/stamp, but I'll probably change it.
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This was actually the first drawing I did of SpaceBear....go fig I clean it up last.
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Continuing on with character sketches that I work on in between working in Maya. I finished off the super heroes and villains not long ago, so I figured this one would cover more antihero characters, i.e. civilians. This one feels a little boring, but I'm going to finish off this little side project with some more villains, because I have some fun ideas there.
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I know, more updated drawing pages. I was considering the original drawing as a portfolio piece, and decided that the design should be more of a "verb" than a "noun". It needed more action I guess is what I'm trying to say.
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DAC Turnaround Challenge

This is a rotation sheet of a character I came up with to go with the rhino character I made for my timeline. It felt good to practice rotations again especially since my last one turned out so horribly. I feel like this one was an improvement, although I was hoping for a less grungy appearance in favor of more of a clean, animated look. But still, I'm pretty happy with how this gut turned out.

As always, criticism and critique is greatly appreciated, don't be afraid of offending me.
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A commission done for someone on another site. This one was definitely a challenge, but I like that when working. When drawing this I had to have a bunch of anatomy books open.
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Anurognathus ammoni - the DEFINITIVE version.

This is the first truly high-fidelity restoration of Anurognathus anywhere, taking into account the rigorous skeletals done by Mike Hanson, a.k.a. Archosaurian: [link] [link]

The main difference is I shortened and thickened the neck a little bit, the fossil specimens don't seem to show such a long neck.

Anurognathus was a very small Late Jurassic pterosaur of the Rhamphorhynchoid clan.... unlike most members of this group, it had a very reduced, stubby tail that was useless as a rudder, but probably served as an attachment point for either wing membranes or leg membranes - a configuration that was echoed by the entirety of the Pterodactyloids, the other great clan of pterosaurs.

It was mainly an insect eater and probably lived in trees. One popular theory is that it hitched a symbiotic ride on the backs of giant sauropods like Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, eating the bugs that sucked their blood. Its strange whiskers may have been used for sensing very small disturbances in air flow caused by flying insects, or simply for raking them in towards the needle-sharp teeth.

Anurognathus had three very close relatives: Batrachognathus, Dendrorhynchoides, and Jeholopterus, the largest member of the Anurognathidae. All three were small and insectivorous. More distant relatives include the far older Dimorphodon and Peteinosaurus - both of which had large, puffin-like beaks and the primitive long tails typical of classic Rhamphorhynchoids. Anurognathus is known from both an adult and a juvenile specimen, a rare find for most species of small pterosaurs.

Pencil on paper, 8.5x11", 2009.
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A selection of pseudo-ungulate hadrolopes, one of the primary dinomammalian prey families. The muntjac-like bipedalope at top represents the basal, hypsilophodont-like form from which the other hadrolope genera derived. (Note the foot detail at upper right, illustrating the basal form of the bipedalope "hoof.") While bipedalopes still thrive worldwide, their quadrupedal cousins have diversified in form to exploit all manner of ecological niches, with some becoming more antelope-like (middle) while others have converged on the extinct hadrosaurs (bottom). The prototypal bipedalope traits of horns, dorsal ridge, and specialized dentition have been retained and often greatly modified or exaggerated in contemporary hadrolope forms. The emerging Titanolope genus, of which the individual at bottom is an example, has produced several more robust, long-necked, and long-legged species that appear to be converging on giraffids.

Kudos (or kudus?) once again to Ryan Patrick (Rayn-Hammer) for suggesting that fused horns or antlers might produce a single, compound "monohorn" superficially similar to saurolophian crests. Along with the "duckbill," it seemed an appropriately subtle hadrosaurian touch to the otherwise oryx-like specimen at middle-left.
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