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The Age of Discernment

Wed Aug 1, 2012, 8:13 PM by techgnotic:icontechgnotic:









With great access comes the great responsibility of discernment.


→ This article was inspired by the conversation in the comments generated from last week’s Suggestivism article.


As we traverse the final phases of maximum raw information accumulation, potentially equipping us for jacking in to the promise of the Singularity, the contents of many lifetimes’ worth of knowledge, art, education, and history are now at our fingertips. More and more Universities, libraries and arts institutions have swung open their digital doors and granted access to their lectures, courses and curricula free of charge to anyone in the world with a connection to the web. Access to education is fundamentally shifting our society towards an unmappable future.









Comments: 60
Favourites: 696
Views: 16,289


Here at deviantART there seems to be a new age dawning as well. deviantART has always provided an artist to artist education for new and developing artists. But more and more artists, both amateurs and professionals of all levels, are using deviantART as a real resource and platform in the creation and exhibition of their personal art gallery rather than just a place to exhibit their own works. And the arts conversation on deviantART runs across all race, religion, social classes, age, gender and education levels. Participants in this grand conversation often include the elites in their chosen medium as well as artists just creating their first sketches. The sheer amount of art categories on dA is breath-taking, the scope of beauty and imagination within each of those categories unparalleled.










Comments: 387
Favourites: 2,387
Views: 297,771


But is there a danger to all information – and all art – being right at the fingertips? Will we lose sense of what is bad, good, better and best art? Will art become just one process or activity, rather than the occasional expression of the miraculous that it sometimes is? What will become of our powers of discernment in the flood of information? Rather than becoming self-satisfied about all the great art now just a click away, maybe we should start trying to decide what meaning art should have in our lives, as well as what art is meaningful for our future. Important things in how we are beginning to communicate as one worldwide community of peoples are happening just beneath the surface. Now may be the time when more, not less, thoughtfulness should be deployed in discerning which art means the most to you as an artist or art appreciator?









Comments: 174
Favourites: 4,130
Views: 30,200


We seem to have come to a major societal “look before you leap” moment. Shall we just keep technologically cannonballing forward, full steam ahead to wherever our digital momentum takes us? Or is it time to pump the brakes and start a serious conversation about whether or not the fundamental shift in the technology of our society should usher in a new fundamental shift in the values of our society.


So the great question confronts us all, and with each day it becomes less hypothetical and more urgent: With the advent of universal access to all information all of the time how will we decide to personally sort or categorize content or make preferences or align to and thus create global values? Will we be able to take the new responsibility thrust into our hands and really do the right thing? Will we choose the global over the personal? Will we start making choices with an eye toward our digital information-based “footprints” - - the record of our choices - - and the unintentional fallout as they become votes and statistics affecting other choices for the unseen populace of the World Wide Web?



We now have just about all the information we’re ever going to need to make a real change in this world. The ability to discern what in that information is important and which takes priority is the new challenge of our age.




















Comments: 12,728
Favourites: 42,226
Views: 1,297,196






Comments: 1558
Favourites: 2,194
Views: 11,811










Comments: 5
Favourites: 15
Views: 141






Comments: 118
Favourites: 2,681
Views: 18,733












QuestionsFor the Reader


  1. Does the sheer amount of art becoming more and more available for your perusal give you a sense of excitement – or a feeling of being overwhelmed and anxious that you’ll never be able to take it all in?
  2. Do you think you personally have enough of a power of discernment to be able to separate important and meaningful from superfluous art?
  3. While being able to discern between what is “important” and what is “fun” art, is it your feeling that frivolous art meant simply for enjoyment is just as important as more substantial meaningful art?
  4. What if anything will be the personal impact on your life of the arrival of the Singularity in regard to your relationship with the arts?









With great access comes the great responsibility of discernment. As we traverse the final phases of maximum raw information accumulation, potentially equipping us for jacking in to the promise of the Singularity, the contents of many lifetimes’ worth of knowledge, art, education, and history are now at our fingertips. More and more Universities, libraries and arts institutions have swung open their digital doors and granted access to their lectures, courses and curricula free of charge to anyone in the world with a connection to the web. Access to education is fundamentally shifting our society towards an unmappable future.


Writers: $techgnotic
Designers: $marioluevanos
Features
Urban by ~WWWest
Ronald Reagan Riding a Velociraptor by *SharpWriter
Athena by ~Michael-C-Hayes
sprained minds by `suzi9mm
148 by ~StudioUndertheMoon
Green and greener by ~dianadades
Saudade, I by *borissov
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Comic-Con: Day 3

Sun Jul 15, 2012, 2:37 AM by Heidi:iconheidi:
Saturday kicked off Day 3 of Comic-Con, and the crowds poured onto the convention floor to start the weekend in Geek Style.

At noon, deviantART hosted our final panel: How to Supercharge Your deviantART Profile Like the Masters.  Moderated by none other than our fearless ninja, Angelo (aka spyed), we were honored to have the following superstars share their deviantART experiences with the crowd:

- Adam Warren (AdamWarren -- “The Dirty Pair,” “Empowered”)
- Mark Brooks (diablo2003, from Marvel Comics)
- Jim Zubkavich (Zubby -- Project Manager of Creative Services, Udon Entertainment)
- Dave Elliott (DeevElliott -- “Heavy Metal Magazine”)
- Wenqing Yan (yuumei, creator of “Knite,” “1000 W0RDS”)
- Kevin Eastman (Kevineastman -- co-creator of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
- Chris Sanders (alohalilo creator of “Lilo & Stitch”)

It was truly a remarkable and informative hour.  Brains were picked from every angle and our panelists described everything from the importance of joining deviantART, to how maintaining one's Profile Page can help launch a career.  (Fear not!  If you weren’t able to attend in person, word on the street is that video highlights may be showing up on hq in the near future.)


spyed hosts our "Supercharge Your Profile" panel.

As things were winding down, each panelist was asked to summarize the best piece of advice they wanted to impress on the crowd.  The following is a quick soundbite of what each had to say.

Be persistent, relentless, and unstoppable, even when you want to stop. Especially when you want to stop.
-Adam Warren (AdamWarren)

Thrive on criticism. 
-Mark Brooks (diablo2003)

Create something that's genuine and something you like. 
-Jim Zubkavich (Zubby)

Don’t be a lurker. Be positive and that will come back to you. 
-Dave Elliott (DeevElliott)

Don't be afraid.  Everyone starts out not being awesome.  Immerse yourself in the process, and before you know it, you'll be great. 
-Wenqing Yan (yuumei)

Whatever you think is art... is art. Period. 
-Kevin Eastman (Kevineastman)

Whatever you do, try and put a story in your work.  It will make you a better artist. 
-Chris Sanders (alohalilo)

With our last panel out of the way, we were free to focus our energies in other directions, while the deviantART booth in Artists’ Alley buzzed along like clockwork.


DaneRot spends his downtime by sketching Hulk!

Besides the myriad amazing reasons we had to be psyched about coming to Comic-Con, this year was especially exciting, because we just launched our Premium Content Platform earlier this week. It’s always a good feeling to launch a new feature that we know will enrich the lives of deviants, but to launch something that directly benefits artists and generates them real earnings, well, you can understand that we’d be brimming with excitement to spread that news to everyone we meet.

Friend of deviantART Uwe Maurer of Ambient Design brought spyed and me (Heidi) to The Art Department’s booth to talk about some really exciting things.  Most of them we have to keep hush-hush for now, but what we can say is that there may be some interesting ways for Premium Content to kick-start their students’ portfolios and careers.

We were also thrilled to hear that, while we were running around Comic-Con, Bleeding Cool wrote an article about the potential impact Premium Content offers independent artists.



Since we had a camera crew hanging around for some interviews we planned to do with artists, we thought we’d learn a little more about the artists that make up Comic-Con. Today, spyed was able to make his way through the artists sitting in the Small Press section. As you can see, there were some pretty big hearts inside the artists in Small Press.



Walking around outside of Artists’ Alley also meant getting to spend time at some of the other booths we’d been rushing past, promising to return to for two days now. marioluevanos and LaurenKitsune took a few moments to dig through bins to recreate the deviantART logo on the giant LEGO wall!



Last year (which was deviantART’s first year sponsoring Artists' Alley), we offered two scholarships to artists emerging artists who'd always dreamt of going to Comic-Con.  It was such a success that, this year, we offered six scholarships, and set them up near the deviantART booth.

On Thursday, we hosted mleiv and larkinheather, while Friday saw the arrival of UNDERANANGEL and SpyrosVerykios-ComiX. Today, we had super artists and deviants Mogorron and sambees. Though weary from travel, they were excited to display their works in Artists' Alley, meet professionals in their industry, and have their portfolios reviewed by the experts!



Other Happenings



chriscopeland and jeffwamester use deviantART muro.


damphyr and megturney battle it out as Wolverine and Mulan.


The amazingness that is cosplayers attending Comic-Con.


Follow deviantart on Twitter for the chance to win free swag...like Fella!

That about wraps up Day 3 of Comic-Con, and we all know what that means -- tomorrow is the final and saddest day of Comic-Con.    However, we're trying to make the good cheer last as long as we can before we start X-ing out the calendar days until Comic-Con 2013.

~Heidi and LaurenKitsune


Read more:
Comic-Con: Day 1
Comic-Con: Day 2
Comic-Con: Day 3
Comic-Con: Day 4

Saturday kicked off Day 3 of Comic-Con, and the crowds poured onto the convention floor to kick off the weekend in Geek Style.

~$Heidi
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Odyssey Propulsion 6

Wed Dec 12, 2012, 6:51 PM








We want to especially thank an elite core of Odyssey II writers:




Those deviants truly embodying the spirit of the project by continuing to create and submit next chapters – no matter the story’s refusal to go along with their proposed direction. The zeitgeist is a powerful force, but the artist must know when to sail against the been-there-done-that. And our writers, artists and poets have been doing that week after week. So many artists and writers continue to send in wonderful material week after week.






We have decided to extend the writing deadline for the last chapter to December 31 and we're expanding the Word count to 800 words for our final chapter! Artists will then have two full weeks to illustrate our final chapter - meaning artwork for Chapter 8 will be due by January 14, 2013. Any Animations/films and poetry deadlines are now extended until Jan 14! We will then unleash, I mean publish, this tale of Paul’s very unexpected journey!


Visit Odyssey II Project Page







Elite Core Odyssey Participants - Profile 1






































:iconkill-natalie:

Kill-Natalie, whose vibrant kinetic wordsmithery is always a pleasure to read. A young artist with a sense of grotesquerie that’s quite remarkable.


:thumb332523457:




























The atmosphere of friendly competition, mutual aid when needed and fulsome community that has endured throughout all the glitches and hiccups of Odyssey and Odyssey II is something I will always be grateful to have beheld and well worth all the 4 a.m. technical meltdowns. Hopefully this is only the beginning of many such innovative projects. The real prize in this “contest” is witnessing how deviants and other creative entities from around the world can come together in a mere flash of time to help each other build something unique in storytelling that points to the very future of the written narrative.























We want to especially thank an elite core of Odyssey II writers: Those deviants truly embodying the spirit of the project by continuing to create and submit next chapters – despite the story’s refusal to go along with their proposed direction. The zeitgeist is a powerful force, but the artist must know when sail against the been-there-done-that. And our writers, artists and poets have been doing that week after week. The same names continue to send in wonderful material week after week...
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Authentic Citizenship

Wed Jun 20, 2012, 9:50 PM by techgnotic:icontechgnotic:


Read Part 1







:icontechgnotic: Jun 20, 2012 by techgnotic




Once Again, The Room Fell Away


The prodigious artistic and cultural exchange that we have all committed ourselves to building, to participating in and to sharing with each other every day at deviantART often occurs in RL on the decks of HQ as well. One of the best aspects of being in my position here at deviantART is the privilege to curate salons with artists of every medium and success level imaginable, art appreciators, writers, and educators from all points of light within the deviantART community inviting them to make the trek to HQ for what always manifests as an inspiring, thoughtful, educative, and enlightening dialogue. But sometimes, sometimes, things rise to a whole other level. You suddenly find yourself magically reaching that special deviantART “destination” that is a connection point of art, life, community and communication that has no specific Office # designation. The room falls away…


Recently, in a case in point, artists Jeff Wamester and Chris Copeland came by and shared a vision of and insight into their deviantART experience that was so inspiring that we decided right there on the spot to build an article together and share our conversation with you. jeffwamester and chriscopeland spoke to us about having built lifelong friendships, finding their first industry mentors, procuring their first professional jobs, and generally growing up alongside the deviantART community.










As two of the most widely and wildly admired and emulated deviantARTists, Jeff and Chris have also been infinitely inspired by you, the deviantART community. They have managed to return that unprecedented amount of love and admiration in abundance, cementing their reputations forever as artists who live to give back to other artists and help them grow and achieve their own unique personal greatness. In this, they embody the living spirit of deviantART community, living the life and walking the walk every day, always going the extra mile to help one more artist have a positive and inspiring experience. Jeff and Chris are the embodiment par excellence of what I like to call "authentic citizenship" in the deviantART community.


The focus of our most recent conversation, was the importance of deviant artists’ profile pages being built up and presented in such a way as to really allow the artist to be viewed – to be really “seen” – as the fullest portrait possible when the artist is considered for a job in the myriad arts entertainment fields. There is too often the idea that simply displaying the art up onto the page will be enough to get a young artists spotted and hired. But there’s just so much more that must go into the holistic representation of our deviants in order that they get the best shot at gainful employment, recognition and arts careers. Jeff and Chris have been through this process. They are both top professionals with top jobs. Here's what they had to say.



Notice to the Reader


This will be our first two part article. Next week I will publish the second half of my interview with Jeff Wamester and Chris Copeland in addition to more of their tips for new artists. jeffwamester and chriscopeland have also made a list of the up and coming powerhouse artists on deviantART that they feel are ready to take their careers to the next level. Before we publish that list Wednesday (5/27), can you please list your personal choices for the top five undiscovered powerhouse artists on deviantART?
















An Interview with


Jeff Wamester & Christopher Copeland















Being employed professionally at Cartoon Network & Film Roman, you have achieved a genuine level of success, the dream and goal of multitudes of deviantART community members. How much of your current success do you attribute to your being an active deviant for the past 5+ years?








In terms of networking and relationships, I would say around 90%. In reality, it could have been a much longer road if it weren't for the relationships I was blessed to develop through deviantart. I think a VERY important part of success as an artist comes from the relationships developed through the course of a career as people need to feel they can depend on you to deliver and/or be easy/fun/inspiring to work with.








I mean, I don’t know how much I can attribute without sounding too fanatical about it, but deviantART certainly accounts for a VAST majority of my success, and most importantly with my getting IN to TV animation. I mean over the course of 8 years its insane how many fans and supporters that I have had the pleasure of being exposed to (artistically people, artistically, lol) and due to that type of exposure, the amounts of encouragement and affirmation of my style and my vision artistically has contributed SO much to who I am as an artist. So yeah, I could go on trying to paint the picture, but as far as a number goes, I would say that deviantART is about 85-90 percent responsible for me getting in. Also being able to talk with guys that were in the industry through the wall that deviantART offered was amazing, and I use the word wall, because the professional guys felt safe with communication to me through deviantART, and also, I felt safe to be able to be honest as to where I was with the ideas we would speak about as well as be honest with who I was as a person, that way, they got to know me through my art as well as through who I am individually, without risk of any kind.














What are the special networking elements and other tools and resources that were made available to you as dA members that made the leap from amateur to professional artist possible? How valuable is the emotional currency invested in an artist and his/her work in an artist’s eventual success?








Well, there are few things specifically as well as a few generic ideas that deviantart provide...


Specifically: Favorites ( good work allows a viral nature to exposing the work that you do ), Galleries ( they are really versatile and professional looking allowing a nice dynamic presentation ) and strange as it seems, comments.  Comments are great because they allow for a nice comfortable place to discuss art, work that you do and at least start a nice rapport with people you would not otherwise meet.


Generically speaking: Overall community; having previously lived in Connecticut, meeting or having places where I could meet and get to know people who loved cartoons, comics and games was extremely limited.  Most of the time I felt like a tiny little island in the middle of the ocean.  Not to mention the doubtful looks I would get from people who asked me what my career goals were. "Animator" and/or "comic book artist" sure did get me a lot of, "Oh that's wonderful" or "wow, thats great" accompanied by the "when will he ever grow up and get a job" look of disapproval.  DeviantART meanwhile was something that definitely provided that connection, feeling of hope and encouragement that I craved. The sheer number and passion of the DeviantART members really has no equal and has been a huge source of inspiration.








I think when looking at deviantART, its easy to think about how many people travel through the site, and even on top of that, how many decision making industry professionals must travel through the site. With that idea alone, its easy to see that in all of its most basic offerings, that deviantART offers you a space to be yourself in a context of others doing the same and allows “your space” to be viewed by industry pros that are able to get a good idea as to how you do what you do. That’s just the basic format and resource, not even mentioning the gallery set up and how it helps for an individual to take a nice trip through your progression (or lack thereof, which also helps) and see where you have come from as far as your expression goes artistically. Its also a great place to be expressive in ways outside of your art, the journal area is probably the most telling of how an individual is in real life, definitely more of tell-tell about what type of personality traits that you will possibly be bringing into the workplace you might be being considered for. It also allows for individuals whom are more of the introverted framework, personality-wise, to reach out to an artist that they might admire, and be able to be themselves without feeling too intimidated about having to approach that person in real life. These are all things that helped me in one way or another.


It's unbelievable how amazing it is to have some of these professional artists say things to you like “hey great piece”, or to have another budding artist stop through your gallery and give you a nod or something like that. I know for me being a guy that is very verbally expressive, it meant the world to me to have someone SAY something to me, especially in the times where I was going through an art slump or something. Taking a step further, and having a group of people hitting me up for commissions, that stuff is MONUMENTAL for me man. I mean, just as an artist to have a community accept you through your art and your online persona is amazing enough, but them to run into these folks at conventions and whatnot, its just flat out phenomenal, and I cant be more thankful for it all. The value is definitely up there in terms of what it does for the artist to receive those types of nods and props, its as simple as an individual puts their work up here to get feedback, and when that happens, and the feedback is positive, it really makes you feel like you are (at least for the moment) on the right track, it means a lot.













Were there instances of moments of depression or despair in which you considered giving up and getting a “straight” job – and what did you do, mentally and literally physically, to snap out of it and to stay on course to fulfilling your artistic dreams and visions?








Whew... now that's a question...


Well, the trail was not a straight line and yes there were terrible moments of depression and despair. I did take day jobs, I had to, the bills were piling up while I was making $20 a page for comics.  It was tough but I was determined to stay with it even if I was gonna have to make big sacrifices to make it happen ( like sleep, a social life, friends, a car that wasn't a rust bucket and video games ).


And at times I would drop into low points in my life, where the sacrifices seemed overwhelming, where there seemed to be no way any of what I was working towards would happen. I would just push through, believing it would work out.  But as the years went by and I starting getting older, those push throughs got harder. My time shrank, my obligations grew and the sacrifices became larger. Then in a very short period in my life, I got married, bought a house and had a son. These were wonderful WONDERFUL things,  however I still felt that something was wrong.  All these major life changes and a key component was missing.  I knew what it was but, it was at that point I had to decide to, for lack of a better expression, "Sh!t or get off the pot." So with the support of my wife we went all in.  We booked a one way trip to California and its been incredible ride ever since.








Oh God yes, there were and still sometimes where im just like “why do I do this?” Haha! Seriously man, its something that I think we all go through, and there is not much you can do about it in terms of avoiding it as an artist. I think I have been blessed to have people around me that continue to encourage me to push forward, and even more important, pushed me when I thought about giving up before even getting in. As far as pushing through it, I mean it’s the idea that I KNOW that im going to get better if I keep drawing, and keep exposing myself to new materials, im bound to improve, its impossible not to. Once I became addicted tot hat idea, I became addicted to drawing more and trying nw things, and as I tried those new things, it seriously wasn’t about “how”, it became about “when”. Also another tip and a great resource that DA offers is the ability to ask people that are involved in the industry about that respective industry. There were so many times that I spoke with guys that are in the animation business even before I got it, and through those conversations, I learned so much that I was able to apply before even getting in, lol. There were lots of cool cats that are willing to answer as many questions and things that they can, but you have to be approachable, and they might not be, but if you persist with respect and a little bit of moderation, I think in time, you will see it all pay off.












What’s the most important thing on a deviant’s profile page for getting that deviant’s art noticed by potential professional employers?  What is it beyond doing great art that finally gets that great art actually noticed?








First and most importantly, just like a portfolio, put your best piece front and center.  I use the "featured" widget. On the web, attention spans are REALLY short so when they land on your page it gotta catch their eye so they will look for more with a better attention level.


Beyond doing great art, it is important to be yourself ( but professional ), authentic and interact with people.  You need to develop relationships and build trust with people. Besides the fact that it will make you a better person, a better artist and inspire you, it will let people know you are a stand up person that they can trust and maybe even inspire them. And realize, you never know who's watching you. Your potential employer ( and/or person that may recommend you )  may have their eye on you before you even know it.








I think seeing the passion and commitment through the piece that is being presented. There are so many “good” artists that do work sometimes and the works is just dead, emotionally exhausted, and all around boring, but the execution is great. And that’s the area that I think a lot of the rookie guys have the benefit of, and that is still being passionate about the prtoperties that they are seeking to draw and put on display. A lot of times the professional guys are just burned out with the same ol’ same ol’ and these up and comers are in a place where they just want to draw the dopest stuff imaginable and they do it, and its great and sometimes they get snatched up on that one piece that they took advantage of having a vision of. That stuff happens all the time on DA, but you have to have that passion for that piece first, YOU HAVE TO. As far as great art getting noticed, I mean, some of my more popular pieces are those that the community takes notice of on their own. Some pieces just have an attraction to them that you cant even predict they will have, and when the people take notice, its time for you take notice of their reaction and try to see what t is that they respond to. I know sometimes I will do a piece of a character from a popular series or genre, and the people just react to it so positively, and it’s a mixture of my vision and the characters that they actually already like, its beautiful when it does happen.












What’s the most inspiring, gratifying or helpful comment you’ve ever received as an artist from another deviant on dA (or anyone, for that matter)?








I don't think it was any one comment in particular, rather it was the comments of many.  To  be able to connect with so many passionate people who love this kind of art, especially so many that I respect has really filled me with a sense of pride about what I do that I never had before.  I guess it makes me feel like the sacrifices mean more, that they were really worth every penny.








So that’s a good question – it’s hard to find or think of one comment. There have been a lot of people who have complimented me at separate times that have meant something different to me at that time. I know I can say in a general sense, receiving compliments from guys I look up to means a lot. These are guys I try to emulate style-wise, so to receive a compliment from them validates a lot of my pursuits. Simultaneously, receiving compliments or words of adoration from a fan who has looked up to my stuff means just as much if not more to me. To know there are people out there looking up to my stuff the way I looked up to the guys I admired, is pretty huge. But, I can think of one I got from Joaquim Dos Santos (www.2-cents.deviantart.com) before I moved out to LA to get into animation, I posted a comment on his page thanking him for giving me a tour of WB, and his response was “hey, you’re a really cool guy, with a great outlook and positive attitude and great art work, and I definitely think you have the chops to make it in animation.” And, speaking specifically about animation, that was the one. But, there are tons that I can think of that I’ve gotten from guys that have pushed me forward.












How many days a week do you work, and for how many hours?  Do you keep a regular routine or await your muse to guide you?  What are essential elements or aspects that must be present in your workspace for your maximum function?  How important is music to fueling your inner artistic eye?  Which music?








Work: I usually work 5 days during the week, anywhere from 10-16 hours per day.  On the weekends I work, 6-10. Which means I do not have the luxury of "inspiration".


Equipment: My Mac and cintiq ( although I love pencil,pen and paper ) and a good chair. And yes, maybe a bit of caffeine ( my life's blood ).


Music: I do listen to music at times but I also listen to a lot of audiobooks.  I'm a storyteller at heart and I get very jazzed up and creative when I listen to a good book.  And of course being a good storyteller requires experiencing a lot of stories.








Every day all day, non-stop EVER! Kind of joking, but honestly because my work is so imagination driven, my brain is always searching out that “muse” and is always trying to stalk pile imagery for later use. Although, my studio hours are usually 9-6, then 6-10, family time, and 5 days out of the week 10-4/5am on work or other independent stuff.


Ahh.. a little bit of both. Because I’m professional, I can’t afford to not have a routine. You have a deadline, dammit – get your work done. But, there is room for a muse, there is room for inspiration to kick in and kind of guide you. So, it’s a little bit of both.


Cintiq. iMac. Art Books. Candy. Caffeine. And…love (wink)


How important is music to fueling your inner artistic eye? EXTREMELY important. I cannot emphasize it enough. I think our generation is very musically inclined. And, for me personally growing up listening to hip hop, jazz, rock, electronic and house the more music, the more new music I have around me, the better.


Mostly everything (minus country), but, right now, Feist “Metals” – her newest album is just unstoppable. I cannot stop playing that album when I draw. And, on the hip hop side, Phonte’s album “Charity Starts at Home” is just as unstoppable and amazing. So, those two make me really get excited to sit down and go, playing those on repeat. I’ll do that a lot. I’ll take an album, and each song speaks to me and puts me in their world. And, sometimes that world defines whatever I’m doing at that time. So, yes, music is REALLY important…really.
















Best Tips for Your Profile Page (Tips 1-5)


by *jeffwamester  & *chriscopeland














1.

Have your best piece featured on your front page.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

It's an immediate turn on or turn off, why not make it an amazing turn on.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

That's your first impression, we all know how important that is.












2.

Identify yourself! Use your deviantID to your advantage!




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

Again, its another opportunity to show what you have as far as art, or even how look and allow people to attach a name to a face and vice versa.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

Let people know who you are and what you do. Would you hire someone if they didn't say who they were or what they did. Might be odd to hire a brew master to be your x-ray technician.












3.

Have your email displayed prominently. You want a prospective employer able to contact you easily.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

It’s a no-brainer that I see a lot of people neglecting to do. Make sure that if a client wants to contact you they can do just it with ease.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

Most people who would recommend you or would hire do not have the time to find a way to contact you. Trust me, they are way too busy. Remove every possible obstacle and create as many ways possible to contact you.












4.

Journal Entries should be authentic.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

No one likes a negative Nancy, and if they do, they usually are not the ones that are going to be giving you a job. Try to be objective in your approach, pose questions as opposed to slamming a person.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

No bemoaning a studio or their products, they may want to hire you.












5.

At the very least respond to the comments on your front page.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

I know guys that are probably 10 times busier than anyone you know and they manage to respond to as many comments as they can. It says something about you and your ability to hear what people are saying. So again, I emphasize, try.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

When you answer, be yourself and let your sense of humor show.

















Once Again, The Room Fell Away. The prodigious artistic and cultural exchange that we have all committed ourselves to building, to participating in and to sharing with each other every day at deviantART often occurs in RL on the decks of HQ as well. One of the best aspects of being in my position here at deviantART is the privilege to curate salons with artists of every medium and success level imaginable, art appreciators, writers, and educators from all points of light within the deviantART community inviting them to make the trek to HQ for what always manifests as an inspiring, thoughtful, educative, and enlightening dialogue. But sometimes, sometimes, things rise to a whole other level. You suddenly find yourself magically reaching that special deviantART "destination" that is a connection point of art, life, community and communication that has no specific Office # designation. The room falls away…

Writers: $techgnotic

Designers: $marioluevanos
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L

ast week we published the video of Josh Wattles, makepictures Fan Art Law panel from Comic-Con. An educative, passionate and very enlightening conversation soon followed in the comments section. You can participate in that conversation here.


This week the superstars of deviantART panel will provide unique insight and advice for artists on the rise in the deviantART community.


Being a member of the deviantART community might be the most important support system a young artists could ever hope to have. That being said, there is also the problem of finding a way to stand out when surrounded by so many fellow talented artists. What are the ways, the secrets, of shining a light on one’s own work? Profile presentation is key. And perhaps no better way of helping deviants achieve the maximum possible impact by creating the very best presentation of their profile and presence on their individual profiles, is to hear from an inspiring group of artists who joined us for a panel discussion on exactly that subject.


The artists who were kind enough to share their thoughts with spyed on this panel may represent divergent currents within the deviantART community, but they share the one imperative of always lending advice and assistance to fellow artists. Whether an artist is a veteran of a lifetime of barely scraping by in the arts, or the hottest thing hanging in galleries, all true artists are of one current forever flowing through the world, all travelers on the same course working toward truth and beauty through creativity.









Something that came to mind when re-watching this discussion during the editing process was the feeling that all of the panelists felt very connected to the deviantART community. They are part of a network of endless support and inspiration that means as much to them now at this point in their career as it did when they were just starting out. I was reminded of this when I came across this deviation from Artgerm last week...







His quote in the comments below the image brought me right back to that thought I was having while watching this panel unfold live at Comic-Con. He said:


"I strongly believe that this is the most inspirational deviation that I ever submitted. So print it out and hang it on your wall and scream "I can do it too!"











Featured PanelistsInclude:









:iconadamwarren:

Adam Warren


AdamWarren

The Dirty Pair (Dark Horse), Empowered (Dark Hourse)






Chris Sanders


:iconalohalilo: alohalilo

Lilo & Stich creator (Disney), How to Train Your Dragon (DreamWorks)






Dave Elliot


:icondeevelliott: DeevElliott

Comic industry veteran, writer and editor of over 10,000 comics projects






Jim Zubkavich


:iconzubby: Zubby

Artist, Writer and Project Manager of Creative Services, Udon Entertainment (UdonCrew),














Kevin Eastman


:iconkevineastman: Kevineastman

Co-creator of The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles franchise and Publisher of Heavy Metal Magazine






Mark Brooks


:icondiablo2003: diablo2003

Marvel Comics






Yuumei (Wenqing Yan)


:iconyuumei: yuumei

Digital Artist and Cyber-Activist













Last week we published the video of Josh Wattles, $makepictures Fan Art Law panel from Comic-Con. An educative, passionate and very enlightening conversation soon followed in the comments section. You can participate in that conversation here.

This week the superstars of deviantART panel will provide unique insight and advice for artists on the rise in the deviantART community.


Highlighted Comments


by ~alonzobartley [link]
• "One should see improvement, if you take at least 20 minutes each day to sketch." - *TerryDodson
• "The one thing every artist should have is the ability to self-correct." - *AdamHughes
• "Push yourself to learn and master something difficult with each drawing or commission." - *AdamHughes
• "Have 70-80% of a visual idea you want to draw BEFORE you start drawing." - `Artgerm
• "Don't show your sketchbook. It's your playground to try things out and make mistakes." - Greg Hyland creator of Lethargic Lad
• "Don't worry about style. Style will come." - David Bluestein storyboardist for Total Drama Island
• "Make sure you can draw good backgrounds. It's usually the weakest area of people's portfolios." Darwyn Cooke


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:icontechgnotic: Aug 29, 2012 by techgnotic

I am bringing your attention to a documentary, Beauty is Embarrassing, that
deeply inspired me after a screening last week. The life wisdom and positive
philosophy unfolding over a lifetime of living as an artist was deeply motivating.
I invited Wayne White, the subject of this documentary, to join deviantART afterwards.
I thought this would be something you would enjoy no matter where you might be at
on your own personal journey as an artist. While watching this I was also reminded
of the heartfelt explanations by many artists of what it means to choose the life of an Artist.









"Do what you love, It's going to lead where you want to go."


seewaynewhite








Please stop and say hello and welcome seewaynewhite in his first week at deviantART.





A strange thing happened at a local café called Fred 62, a sudden sense of something
askew in the universe. I realized it was the painting hanging on the wall above my friend’s
head. Could that really be the mundane landscape painting that hung on the wall in one of
the rooms in my child hood home? Why yes, it is. But the painting has been … infiltrated.
Geometric shapes now hung in the air above the autumnal scud of fallen leaves. Then you get
it: the shapes are actual words. The painting is protesting its near-purposeless existence
by breaking the fourth wall and “speaking” to me. And it’s saying: FoodBasedLifestyleEnhancement –
which is really funny, given the theatre of this moment. What is this? Graffiti? Tagging?









Wayne calls his word paintings and his other creations his “beautiful things” and he exhorts
other artists to ignore the pull of “seriousness” (in hopes of being officially declared “real”)
and instead be guided by what brings them joy to create, to do whatever it is creatively that
makes them happy. Fun and funny shouldn’t be anathema to the “serious artist” – the moment of
laughing at a joke one isn’t even sure one really understands… that should be the most sacred
artistic epiphany.













What I unknowingly discovered is Wayne White’s “word paintings.” Wayne “samples” (buys) otherwise
pointless examples of forgettable paintings, mostly landscapes, and then he paints his messages across
them like billboard credits kicking off a movie. His messages tend to be funny, sometimes deeply poignant
and are often slightly obscene. Not that pure juvenile silliness isn’t his guiding principle. The official
art world doesn’t quite know what to make of Wayne’s increasing popularity and the success he’s experiencing
after a lifetime of being a “jack-of-all-trades” artist. They’ve hung a general “surrealist/pop artist”
label on him and dismissed him as a “non-serious Ed Ruscha.” But Wayne White’s art, funny and silly and profane
as it might be, is far from being a joke. He’s a man and an artist on a mission.







If your first experience of Wayne’s art is his “word paintings,” then you’ve come in late to an amazingly
multifaceted and storied adventure that has been his creative life. It’s a life now documented in a new film,
"Beauty is Embarrassing," which every creative person will enjoy immeasurably and will provide every person seeking
the secret to “what makes the artist tick” with palpable insights. His journey has been as long, oblique and
serendipitous as only a lifelong muse-driven pure artist’s journey can be. Wayne left his home in Tennessee to become
a cartoonist and illustrator for some of the hippest pop-art-laden publications of the day, like The Village Voice.
He then became one of the driving creative forces on the now legendary Pee Wee Herman Show, creating props and puppets
and performing voices. He won three Emmy Awards. His puppetry and art direction talents earned him awards for music
videos as well, including Peter Gabriel’s Big Time and the Smashing Pumpkins’ amazing George Melies-inspired Tonight,
Tonight. But it’s his word paintings that are finally making his name known. Are they “real” art? Or is this some kind
of a joke? It’s Wayne’s mission in life as an artist to address this endlessly-arising “question” so vital to
conversations concerning "high art."
















An Interview withWayne White







Your “word paintings” “sample” pre-existing paintings of kitschy landscapes (i.e., depressing Americana memes).
Do you feel a kinship with early rappers who reinvented music in a similar way, sampling tapes in bargain bins?




Not really. Even though there is a similar aesthetic of recycling. I've recycled junks since the 70's... way before
rap came along. But like rappers I do feel like i'm collaborating with the original artist and harmonizing with the work.









In what ways have your non-fans in the official art world sought to delegitimize your art and your very status
as an artist?  They seem to believe that as an artist provocateur injecting humor into fine art, you are a major threat.
What is this perceived threat?  Why are they so threatened?




First of all I am not perceived as a major threat. if anything I'm perceived as an imitator of Ed Ruscha because I live
in L.A. and I use text. I wish I was a major threat. That would be fun! But I'm afraid I don't have that kind of power. I guess
some people are threatened by humor in fine art because they see it as a corrupting influence.













Your credo that the purpose of artists is to create beautiful things, and your belief that humor is a major part of the “beautiful” might indicate that you hold technical art “study” in low regard. Is there as much point in studying why a portrait is “beautiful” as there is in analyzing why one laughs at a joke?  In fact, as with “deconstructing” jokes, the analysis itself destroys the joke. Do you in fact prefer to remain “awed” by great art and laughing at funny art as the highest tribute to be paid to art (critics be damned)?




The creative act is not an act of analysis. It’s an in the moment spontaneous experience. The analysis comes later by the viewer and the arts. And yes too much analysis sucks the juice out of anything so its the challenge for the artist and the viewer when they are confronting art and humor.













Your broad artistic palate, stretching from painting to cartooning to video to puppetry, indicates a wildly wandering artistic consciousness.  As someone who simply creates, like a mountain climber, “because it’s there,” do you ever feel the need to let the rational part of your mind catch up with the creative part of your mind that is so obviously in control of the show?




I try to keep it strictly creative in the studio. After the physical act of creating something the rational mind always takes over and starts to analyze it so its always a balancing act. Nobody is 100% creative or 100% rational.







What would you say to someone who thinks your art “mocks” art?




Uh.. Thank you.







What would you say to someone who says you’re talented enough to be a “real artist,” if only you’d take it more seriously?




Fuck you. Seriously.







What’s the most important compliment you’ve ever received from someone whose opinions on art you really respect?  




Joel Hodgson called my paintings "magic" and that's coming from a magician!













What would your advice be to a young artist with interests in multiple disciplines and mediums just embarking on a lifetime of making art?




Don't let anybody tell you that you have to concentrate on one thing. You don't. It’s possible to cross over as many times as you want. I think crossing over is a healthy and invigorating thing to do. It freshens up all the genres. Many teachers will try to pigeon hole you unfortunately. Don't listen to them!














QuestionsFor the Reader


  1. When an artwork makes you laugh, do you consciously (or subconsciously) label the work as “not serious art” regardless of the artist’s creativity and talent?
  2. Has there been one moment in your life above all others when you were absolutely awestruck (“embarrassed”) to be in the presence of a particular artwork? Can you compare this with laugh you laughed at the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced in your life?  Are beauty and humor necessities of life – or the whole point of life?


Watch the trailer: Beauty is Embarrassing




Beauty is Embarrassing directed by Neil Berkely hits theatres on Sept. 7th.









The wisdom and positive philosophy that unfolded in "Beauty Is Embarrassing," the documentary about artist Wayne White, was so deeply motivating, we reached out to invite him to become a part of the deviantART community. No matter where you are on your personal journey to become an artist, this documentary is for you. Watching his story take shape, one can't help but be reminded of the heartfelt explanations given by many artists on deviantART of what it means to choose the life of an artist.

Writers: $techgnotic
Designers: $marioluevanos
Featured: *seewaynewhite
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Authentic Citizenship: Part 2

Wed Jun 27, 2012, 8:45 PM by techgnotic:icontechgnotic:




Read Part 1








:icontechgnotic: Jun 27, 2012 by techgnotic




Authentic Citizenship: The Sequel


As promised here is part two of our interview and conversation with Chris Copeland and Jeff Wamester. The sequel to part one keeps the art love rolling with Chris Copeland and Jeff Wamester revealing even more fantastic tips for new artists on the rise. They also share with us their favorite deviants of all time.












Part two of the interview with


Jeff Wamester & Christopher Copeland














How important are maintaining stable personal relationships with family, friends, significant others, workmates and somewhat significant others in the steady production of your art?








It's a tall order to do while you are first trying to make it.  It really takes an understanding and strong family and/or significant other. Hopefully they can understand how important it is to you.  Maybe more accurately that it IS you. Luckily, most of my family has incredibly supportive about what I do.  My wife, most of all has been incredibly supportive through the whole process. ( love ya hon! )








More important than music, lol. As much as a song or an album can speak to me life, nothing can speak to me more than the people around me. My wife most importantly is the source for so much of my inspiration and she continues to ground me daily, my children, my family, my colleagues. I am a reflection of the people I’m surrounded by, and the company I keep is vital to keeping me in touch with who I am as a person and as an artist. And I would be crazy not to include the people whom I have had contact with on dA. I get feedback all the time about what im doing artistically and its so AMAZINGLY helpful to me as a professional. I feel like I have been BLESSED with people in my life to keep me grounded. People of various backgrounds – religious, non-religious, they keep me viewing life from a certain perspective. Also, people are the reason why I enjoy any little successes I have here and there. So, people are very important.










Jeff Wamester 4 by $makepictures












Does chaos, emotional or environmental, block your artistic drive and creativity? NO – it feeds it and inspires it.








Yes, chaos can put a damper on your creativity and productivity... no doubt. But as a professional you need to find a way to get stuff done. Us artists don't often get a vacation or any time off that comes with a check.








Our existence/life is chaotic, our world is chaotic. You ask a Buddhist priest whatever perspective he has of our life, and he’d say something similar or close to chaotic. I don’t think it’s a negative idea BTW. I think there’s a lot of amazing energy in chaos. However, I think navigating and understanding Chaos necessitates relationship, which brings me back to how important people are in my life; to navigate through that chaos with, and express it artistically for me.










Chris Copeland 2 by $makepictures










What is your conception of “authentic citizenship” as it pertains to deviantART’s worldwide community of members? Is this a phenomenon that is almost unique on the Internet and what do you see as its potential as an organizing model extended to the entire web?








deviantART is a unique place. The people that come to deviantART are deeply passionate about art. Even the people that aren't producing or even the people who are here because they are looking for attention, are still here because they are passionate about art. It's very interesting to see how quickly the fakes are sniffed and called out.  Goes to show how important it is to the people who are here.








I think deviantART is special, in that, because it is people’s artistic expression, it’s something they hold so near and dear, its almost like Facebook on stage, or Facebook the “naked” version, where everyone is kind of stripped down to their core values. The most appealing element (comparably speaking) of Facebook is the status update, and, I think what you have with dA is a person’s identity in their gallery, stripped down, raw, status updates. And so, with that, there is this sense of authentic community, because when someone speaks about your art they are speaking critically, with love and honesty (hopefully), and an unfiltered sense of criticism about what you feel is reality, and they are contributing to your growth and your understanding of the world around you.


As far as it’s interface, it’s revolutionary. I think for as many people that complain about the interface changing on dA, the numbers show and increased sense of citizenship, or membership, and that’s huge. Because, it’s showing that dA, like people, it changes, and to have people stick with it through that change, as they themselves are changing, that’s remarkable for the internet…something you can just walk away from at any point. Not to mention dA’s ability to establish sound, personal, authentic personal relationships/friendships as well as serve as a job search, and recruitment service – in addition to a comics/animation/entertainment convention all year round is revolutionary.









Jeff Wamester 3 by $makepictures










Could you identify 5 deviants whose art, though largely unrecognized at the moment, you feel should be immediately highlighted and brought to a larger audience in order to receive its greatly deserved due?





Undiscovered Deviants










One of the most giving people I know...He just loves to tell stories and has serious ambitions for film making and animation. You can see it in everything he does.





A super passionate guy about art. Always has a ton of energy for it and the style to boot. Can be very inspiring.





Just a guy on the rise. His sense for this is stunning.





Not sure how explain it, but he just has it. Could do any kind of art he wants to fine art to comics to animation.





Super nice, heart forward kinda guy with a sense of spot blacks I could only dream of.









I think there are a few that stand out.





He is a director in TV animation and one of the most talented and down to earth people I have ever met in my life. Not to mention he is an absolute POWERHOUSE with his work, having provided design work for Dreamworks animation, as well as being a BEAST on the storyboards, Mel is just a talented and awesome MOFO that I look up to.





My friend and office mate at Cartoon Network Tanner Johnson is AWESOME! Artistically he hates on his own stuff a lot of times, but im telling you the stuff that he does has a real cool flare to it, and watching him grow and learn as an artist is ridiculous. Where Tanner really excels at is with his Storyboards, he has such a natural gift for finding moments in our scripts and just highlighting the hell out of them and making you enjoy them. ALso one of the nicest sincerest guys you will ever meet.





One of my good friends and ridiculous "imaginator" Adam Lucas aka Konjur (www.konjur.deviantart.com) He is a MONSTER of a creator and thinker, his imagination is always pushing his work in directions that are constantly amazing me and the people around him. Another guy that, like myself and Jeff, was scouted on his Deviantart, and his work spoke for itself, and then when meeting him, the guys thought he was cool enough to want him around. His forst gig in Animation was as a storyboard revisionist on Avatar Korra, how you like that, check his work, he's AMAZING!!!!





I know that he has a lot of pageviews already, but seriously, I think that he needs more, what he does with inks is just STUPID DOPE, and not to mention that he is one of the nicest and most genuine guys I have ever had the pleasure of meeting and having a beer with, PUNK ROCK JESUS is all I can say, lookout!




:iconemilyjean29: emilyjean29:


She is a model, and yes, she is pretty, but having spoken to her on a few occasions, and hearing her ideas for how to try to change the scope of what a model does on dA as far as commissions and pushing herself the like, its pretty dope, so big props to her)










Chris Copeland 1B by $makepictures










Were there established artists whose bumps of praise helped you in your career?








I was very lucky to get words of encouragement from some established artists that really hit me really hard. However minute they might feel the effort was, the words were a huge boost to my confidence... They really helped me bridge the gap.  I feel very indebted to them...


Thomas Perkins - tnperkins


Shaunt Nigoghossian - IMDb Profile


Joaquim Dos Santos - JoaquimDossantos


Alex Soto - IMDb Profile


Phil Bourassa - philbourassa


Chris Oatley - ChrisOatley








Oh God yes.





I know Jeff mentioned him, but, to me, he is a sensei in every sense of the word, and his encouragement is what bought me out to Cali in the first place. He is the guy that lead me around the WB animation studios for the first time and personally introduced me to EVERYONE there, he has an AMAZING sense of humor, and his knowlege of what it takes to make it in this industry is UNCANNY, not to mention he’s a MONSTER of a designer and his designs on Cartoon Network's, Young Justice just recently put an Emmy on his mantle. Serious amounts of debt and thanks to him for his mentorship and friendship.





Sorry, I know Jeff mentioned him as well, but I cant help it, he is another big reason im in animation, he is RIDICULOUSLY talented and one of the nicest guys you can meet, but he is a great leader in his abilities, and it really propels you to want to do better as a storyboard guy, he sat the bar pretty high for me early on.





A director of the Emmy award winnig Transformers: Prime, and probably the reason im still in animation. He taught me TONS of the tricks and methods in a way that I understood, and his form of tough love was the medicine I needed to progress as a storyboard artist, and although im still VERY new to the industry and being a storyboard artist, he equipped me with enough to start my career. Hes also a good friend of mine now, and I cherish his friendship emmensely.





Brother in arms, maniac of an artist, and just one of the mentors I look up to from early on, ALWAYS encouraging me before I even thought about animation. He is always sharing his wisdom with me, and CONSTANTLY giving me feedback and great ideas on my output.





Always encouraging me before I was even introduced to deviantART, this guy pulled me behind artist alley tables ad assured me that I would be there one day, much love for that.





Another brother in arms that has been there form the absolute beginning always encouraging me to think outside the box and pushing me and my brothers forward from the beginning.





Convinced me to get a deviantart page more than 8 years ago, and always supported my ideas and thoughts about breaking in, AMAZINGLY nice man that has been showing me the ropes for a while now.





One of the most talented guys in animation and comics, and when he first contacted me and gave me his phone number and encouraged me to make the move from Chicago to LA, it was the icing on the cake, just a great few phone conversations that really helped me believe in my abilities, and instilled hope in the process.





A fellow Chicagoan and former graffiti artist like myself, I have always looked up to him for his imagination and abilities with the pen, and when I found out that he was a fan of my work, and then having him reach out to chill with me and sketch together, it was AMAZING having that experience, and his belief in my abilities s well as his friendship, is something that I treasure to this day.




SO, thats the end of my changes, you can just take those and pop them in in place of the old version.











Jeff Wamester 1 by $makepictures









How important is it to develop lasting friendships with other artists?








I think it's so important to have your circle. A group that you can root for and they can root for you. This kind of a career is not easy by any means.  The hours of work, the challenges of the profession,  it affects every part our lives, both professionally and personally.  You need that circle that allows you to lean on each other and inspire each other. I would not be where I am without my friends ( they know who they are! ).








Very. I can’t even explain how challenged I am by my friends who are also artists. It’s like having a college education at your disposal. Being able to be challenged by them, just because we view our style and things we see differently. There’s just and endless source of inspiration to having friends as artists. I wouldn’t be an artist without other artists around me, most notably my two brothers. This goes back to the citizenship of dA and how important it is to invest in your page and let the people around you know who you are. Because, eventually, they will contribute to what you do as an artist, and as well as you contributing to what the people around you do artistically.









Chris Copeland 5 by $makepictures










Can rivalries with other artists be a healthy thing that can be conducted in a positive manner, or are they pretty much always detrimental to both artists?








I think it can but not everybody thinks so. It's fine if both sides have a healthy view of competition. If you see it as a great way to improve, then it's a great thing. However, if you equate your value as human being to your achievements in your art or career then obviously you will get hurt and probably should stay away until you are ready. So, in my opinion it's not about whether competition is unhealthy, it's really about whether the people involved are mature enough to take advantage of its benefits.








I believe that rivalries ABSOLUTELY have the ability to be conducted in a positive manner, im a big believer in this idea. It happens all the time in Animation, and im sure in other industries as well, and it’s a great thing when it happens the way that I think its supposed to. I have a group of friends that are also artists, and we are constantly trying to push each other to be better and go further artistically, and sometimes, the words fail and we have to execute artistically what we are thinking and show it around to each other in order to push each other. I know for me, when I look at some 15 year old prodigy on dA, it always pushes me, I usually leave a comment trying to discourage them moving to the states and taking all of my work, lol. But seriously, I generally try to encourage them, and also let them know that they inspired me in some way, and it usually grounds for a great relationship to be established upon. So yeah, I think there is a lot of good in healthy rivalries, but I do think there is a lot to be said about moderation being the idea, you don’t want to ALWAYS compete with your fellow artists, I think that can get out of hand, and then door for receiving wisdom from one another can be detrimental.









Jeff Wamester 2 by $makepictures




Chris Copeland 3.5 by $makepictures









Is it wise to seek romantic fulfillment and a true love with another artist – or is this something that just doesn’t work?








I don't see why not. It's another one of things where both artists have to be truly honest with themselves. Do you have a mature view on your relationship between you and your art and/your career? Relationships are often forged where art has brought the artists together.  However competition can start to poison the relationship if both parties don't have a healthy view on competition, or can keep competition out of the relationship's dynamics. So, I would, before getting serious with another artist, examine my relationship with art.








SURE, lol. I guess, maybe....yeah, I think so. HAHAHAHA! (Im sorry, that’s a funny question, lol) I definitely think that 2 artists can work out, I will emphasize “CAN”. I also think that can is a question of capability and not probability, lol. I have known a good amount of artists that have dated other artists, and as long as the competition stays at a healthy balance, those relationships usually work out. I have seen the other side though, where jealousy takes hold of one or the other and there is no bond that can keep them from wanting to “out-do” the other, so theres that. Not to mention that 2 artists usually have strengths in the same area, and I know for me and my wife, although artistic, she is CLEARLY a better person than I am in the other areas of our life and so I give her all the props and freedom in the world with everything that we own, cause she will actually be a better steward with them than myself, lol. So, my final answer is yes, it think they can work out… sometimes, lol.


That's what I got man, let me know if you need clarity or anything on any of this. This is soooooo EXCITING!!!!!!












Best Tips for Your Profile Page (Tips 6-10)


by *jeffwamester  & *chriscopeland














6.

Absolutely no questionable material on your front page.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

Seriously folks, if you want to work in the industry of anything (other than porn, lol) its going to be hard for the big guys to show your work off if you have a bunch of questionable materials on your page, just think about it as if your mom, or grandmother will be visiting your page.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

You don't want to be pigeon-holed for adult material. Make sure you keep all avenues open.












7.

Prominently display a link to your website.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

This is a big one as well, the funny thing is that you almost want to lead people away from your deviantART page (sorry dA guys, lol) but the reality is that you have your Fav's, Your wishlist and a bunch of other artwork on your main page that isn't your work, you would definitely want to pull clients to a place where you are at the center of the attention. I have a blog that I send people to.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

I use a hub site that connects to all my social media. It lets anyone who wants to connect more can easily do so.












8.

Make a memorable avatar that is YOUR art.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

Again, another way tot show off your work, I have literally seen avatars that have forced me to visit that individuals dA page, and then to either be AMAZED, or quickly turned away because everything else falls flat, lol.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

If you don't it will automatically create an air of distrust, the moment they visit your site.












9.

Take advantage of the features/widgets offered in your deviantART page.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

dA is not some cheaply placed site with a small amount of customization, it should be viewed as your home and taken care of, and also used to your advantage. There is so much to be said about the little things here and there that Deviantart offers, its almost hard to name, but fill out the information about yourself, use your journa,ls to express yourself with the words your art can speak.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

There's things like twitter feed, gallery folders, featured image and especially deviantID that can help you reveal more about who you are.












10.

Treat your page as a real representation of you and who you are.




:iconchriscopeland: chriscopeland:

The last thing you want to happen is that your gallery becomes stagnant, and/or neglected, that would be a waste of something amazing that has been handed to you. Use your gallery, make sure that all of if points back to you as a person, it says what you want it to say, and keep changing it as you change as a person, so that no matter what the people that visit get a feel of you as a person.




:iconjeffwamester: jeffwamester:

Use your favorites folder to show what inspires you and where you passions lay. People, including possible employers want to know this stuff to get a better representation of who you are. Remember, in reality your dA page is your first interview.














As promised here is part two of our interview and conversation with Chris Copeland and Jeff Wamester. The sequel to part one keeps the art love rolling with these two artists revealing even more fantastic tips for new artists on the rise and reveal their favorite deviants of all time.

You can find part one here.
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Comics Are Art

Thu Jul 5, 2012, 7:50 PM by techgnotic:icontechgnotic:

Comic-Con Journey to the Heart of The New Summer Vacation


Americans have a long summer vacation tradition of visiting the foreign capitals of the world and being sure to spend at least one day in each nation’s most iconic art museum. In Paris, we visit the Louvre. In Madrid, the Prado. In Rome, the Borghese. We feel far more comfortable in identifying the different peoples of our planet through examples of their greatest art works than we do about identifying ourselves as being represented by any one iconic “American” art museum or artist. Maybe the country is just too big for one musuem and so it has always fallen to our pop arts to carry the true visual narrative of what’s going on in the hearts and minds of the masses.





Comic-Con has become the new arts and culture go-to in domestic summer vacation destinations. It makes sense that so many are drawn to this mecca of re-connection with the roots of our first awakening into the joys and wonders of mythical and fantasy narratives. Where our organized religions and public school civics classes have stumbled, our comic books have for the last century taken up the slack in teaching us our codes of decency and chivalry and world citizenship. Now we are drawn to spend some hard-earned vacation time in enjoying what over the years has become for so many of us our guiltiest sheer pleasure, the feast of dynamic art and creative storytelling that is the All-American art form of the comic book, as well as a celebration of the movies and games and all else that has sprung from these simple works of ink on paper.





deviantART at San Diego Comic-Con International


We are hosting five panels covering the superstars of deviantART, yuumei, yayacosplay, Fan Art Law and "How To" on using deviantART as a publishing platform. And just like last year, deviantART is bringing the digital world to the comic convention floor in Artists' Alley.


Click here for detailed information about our various panels!



Scholarship-Winning Deviants


Of special interest to deviant ARTists spending some vacation time at Comic-Con this year will be the works of six scholarship-winning deviants that will be on display in Artists Alley and will be critiqued by leading industry professionals. The winners were chosen by comics industry veteran DeevElliott. Also, deviantART is hosting a cosplay art show culled from over 15,000 photographic submissions. Prints will be available through silent auction, with proceeds going to the Shriners Burn Hospital.






deviantART Comic-Con on Pintrest


Take a look at the work of over 100 deviants participating in Artists' Alley on our Comic-Con Pinterest board!




In the comics world, we project the best of ourselves and our hopes and dreams for our lives and the lives of all others on the planet. Of course our fantasy narratives are missing many of the key “real-world” pieces that doom real-world efforts at achieving peace and tranquility, but our intent is pure and good. And until we figure out the really difficult real-world solutions to solving our cultural, political and environmental impasses, let us be sure to safe-keep our dreams of peace and justice, if only on the pages of our comic book art.





Questions for the Reader


  1. Is there any one artist who best defines your particular country's art for the world?
  2. Do you feel that fine artists like Pollock and Warhol tell the story of America as well as what might be understood by reading comic books?
  3. Have you been more inspired as an artist (or an arts enthusiast) by comic book artists or by fine artists (American and other)?
  4. Which art museum in the world would you most like to visit before you die?
  5. Which comic book or pop artist would you most like to meet before you die?


Comic-Con journey to the heart of the new summer vacation. Americans have a long summer vacation tradition of visiting the foreign capitals of the world and being sure to spend at least one day in each nation’s most iconic art museum. In Paris, we visit the Louvre. In Madrid, the Prado. In Rome, the Berghese. We feel far more comfortable in identifying the different peoples of our planet through examples of their greatest art works than we do about identifying ourselves as being represented by any one iconic “American” art museum or artist. Maybe the country is just too big for one musuem and so it has always fallen to our pop arts to carry the true visual narrative of what’s going on in the hearts and minds of the masses.
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What


Superheroes


Should Today's Technologies Inspire?








:icontechgnotic:by techgnotic
April 25, 2012

We got to interview a visionary futurist with an eye on technology about what would inspire today's comic book writers to create our next superheroes with knowledge of real technological and scientific advancement.


You never know when it’s going to happen – that otherwise quotidian moment when you suddenly realize your entire thought process has just been tripped up and cast down a cerebral rabbit-hole destination unknown.  Little did I know that what began as a typically pleasurable lunch with spyed and makepictures during the San Diego Comic-Con last year would morph into a mind-expanding mental wormhole voyage to the future courtesy of another guest at our table, JordanGreenhall, known to me only as the co-founder of DivX, Inc., the prestigious leader in software creation for video authoring and encoding.


The question was raised: what’s in store for the future of all this?  (“all this”, i.e., the costumed conventioneers milling about the miles of booths promoting sci-fi movies, comics, toys, videogames and videogame systems, etc.)


Jordan began to answer the question … and that’s when the convention floor began to fade away into a surreal swirl of background static, as a true visionary began time-tripping my brain forward into the future.  I now know why he’s at the top of the speakers’ list of every year’s futurist society conclave, philanthropic ethicist entrepreneurs summit and Aspen Institute-style fix-the-planet think tank confab.  He sees through the pop clatter and clutter into the heart of what’s happening, where it’s all going, and what’s important and why.















So who is this guy rewiring

my cranial circuits, anyway?


Besides revolutionizing the way video is brought to all our digital devices with the DivX codec, Jordan is a trustee of the Santa Fe Institute, a non-profit research center dedicated to analyzing and addressing the planet’s “environmental, technological, biological, economic and political challenges.”





This is the key to knowing what Jordan is really about, besides being a new tech genius. He’s one of the good guys who has decided to devote his knowledge of and special position in the new media revolution to turn the world historic wave of change washing over us in the direction of something positive, a better world. To that end, he is indefatigable as a globetrotting guest lecturer, sharing his insights and visions as an advocate for the “efficient, collaborative, open” model of new media-driven information dispersal, and an opponent of the old “closed, centralized, inauthentic” model of information control. Jordan is a prophet for the new wave, and he preaches that enlightenment comes when one accepts that the wave cannot be possessed and controlled, but only understood and then utilized for everything that knowledge of it can bring to this world and future generations.



The “digitization/socialnetworking/participation” wave is as profound and world-changing as Gutenberg’s invention of movable type. And this wave cannot be “owned” and controlled – it can only be ridden by those who seek to understand it, build it and share it with their digital network communities.











That’s all well and good, but what about the future of sci-fi

and superheroes like Iron Man and Wolverine?




I can only attempt to adequately paraphrase his scientific reference-laden response: Quantum mechanics and new discoveries flowing out of our technological revolution (like what’s going on with the Large Hadron Collider in Europe) is going to fundamentally impact and evolve science fiction, not least of which the “origins stories” of its superheroes.


The caped superheroes prowling Comic-Con are the products of the science speculation that excited creative artists back in the 1950s and 60s. The “science fact” being exponentially produced and disseminated to writers and artists currently will soon result in a whole new paradigm, a radical new chapter in sci-fi stories and heroes. Soon new sci-fi heroes will have their “origins” in detours through extra dimensions (courtesy of string theory) rather than as a result of radioactive spider bites. Evil nemeses will be much more interested in enslaving humanity through data control rather than by death ray. Superheroes will become much more concerned with using their powers to avert environmental disasters and systems collapses. New sci-fi heroes will have their genesis in our artists’ dreams of solving our current world-catastrophic challenges. “Superman” was imagined by no more than a daydream of possessing superhuman strength and being able to fly.










Today’s “imagineers” need only click on the science page of their online newspaper to be provided the raw ingredients for new superheroes with quantum mechanical and interdimensional identities and powers far more mindbending than those possessed by the super heros presently haunting the aisles of Comic-Con.













An interview with:


Jordan Greenhall







Sci-fi at bottom has always been anchored in “possible futures” based on speculative science. What scientific “new idea” do you see really catching fire in the popular imagination which will become a new “standard” for sci-fi stories?




We’ve always known that fiction can (and does) create reality. The often cited connection between Star Trek and a wide variety of our favorite toys (including the incorrigible efforts to fabricate teleportation) is a classic example. What is happening today is that the line between “future” and “present” is getting thinner and thinner. As a consequence, it seems that many of the “new ideas” that will hit the popular imagination are less widely speculative (in the Roddenberry, Asimov or Clarke sense) than they are practical conjectures that have been on the cutting edge for a while and are just about to move into the popular consciousness.










What do you think will be the “paradigm shift” in how new superheroes (or even our traditional iconic ones) will be conceived and how their stories will be told?




Personally I think that the next wave is going to be the re-absorption of the (super)hero into the hero. The superhero is largely the expression of the desire for power on the part of the powerless. One of the major themes of the current era is the “flattening” of power and new, more complex, challenges. I sense, perhaps, a return to the more human stories of adventure and heroism to which the normal person could, in principle, actually aspire. We will be witnessing the most dramatic “leveling up” of individual power since the invention of multi-cellular life. In many ways, a mid-21st century human will be a superhero. When you speculate about cybernetics, genetic and chemical modifications, and the more esoteric man/machine interfaces (for example, one mind controlling multiple geographically separate bodies) – not much of the “superhuman” is left outside of the “adjacent possible”.










With so much riding on how well a “tipping point” mass of the population of the Earth understands enough about climate change, etc, and how committed they become to changing things – how important is the “educational” and cultural role of comic books and sci-fi genre fictions generally in saving the world?




It’s clear to anyone who’s been paying attention that the “ComicCon” genres are (by far) the most effective “memetic organisms” yet devised by humans. It’s sometimes hard to recall that scarcely 70 years ago these genres were marginalized – by the marginal for the marginal. Can it be the case that the flashlight-lit passions of impotent nerdy teenagers have somehow come to utterly dominate the global zeitgeist? It certainly seems that way. And while the rich rewards of this domination still seem to flow more to Flash Thompson than to Peter Parker, the memetic ball is clearly in Superman’s court. Yes – it seems very likely that something like the memetic success of genre fiction is a necessary component to achieving a global tipping point.










Where should anyone who cares about the future of humanity keep their focus trained right now? What general information resources on the web or elsewhere should the concerned world citizen try to be aware of and monitor regularly?




What I’m seeing right now is that most of the best stuff is happening sub-rosa. Bloggers having “off-the-record” conversations. Private groups on Facebook or wikis. It seems right now to be about acquiring a certain sensitivity. A nose for who is saying something that smacks of the future – and a huge network of people who are mutually surfacing the below-the-surface conversation. When you find someone smart, see who they follow (and retweet) on Twitter. Who do they +1 on Google Plus? Whose answers do they like on Quora? Pretty quickly you’ll find yourself tapping into the vital flow of “the conversation” and, soon enough, contributing to the portions that are most important to you. After all, a primary theme of the Great Transition is interaction – not just monitoring.











What is the single most important inspiration or cause that keeps you motivated to keep on thinking, exploring and seeking solutions for the survival, extension and betterment of human life on Earth and beyond?




My kids. If you make the decision to have children you can no longer afford the luxury of being cynical.












Questions


For the Reader





1Do you prefer science fiction stories in which superheroes or average human beings are the main protagonists? Do you think advancing technology will shift sci-fi to being mainly about humans with tech powers, or will there always be the need for a super-human “superhero?”


2Which classic superhero do you think best fits and exemplifies the essence of the new Technological Age? Which superheroes do you think don’t fit so well and why?





3Which relatively “new” superhero (who reflects the times and tech of 2012 more than 1950) would you like to see raised up out of the pages of his or her graphic novels and turned into a major film or video game on the same level as “Superman” or “Batman”?


4Flying, x-ray vision, super-strength, shape-shifting, invisibility, mind control, etc. are so played out. Can you think of a “new” super power that could really give you the edge in your struggle for goodness to triumph over meanness and evil?










We got to interview a visionary futurist with an eye on technology about what would inspire today's comic book writers to create our next superheroes with knowledge of real technological and scientific advancement. You never know when it’s going to happen – that otherwise quotidian moment when you suddenly realize your entire thought process has just been tripped up and cast down a cerebral rabbit-hole destination unknown. Little did I know that what began as a typically pleasurable lunch with +spyed and $makepictures during the San Diego Comic-Con last year would morph into a mind-expanding mental wormhole voyage to the future courtesy of another guest at our table, *JordanGreenhall, known to me only as the co-founder of DivX, Inc., the prestigious leader in software creation for video authoring and encoding.
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Comic-Con: Day 4

Mon Jul 16, 2012, 9:08 PM by Heidi:iconheidi:
On Sunday, the 4th and final day of San Diego Comic-Con, we were able to keep the love flowing to show the artists and art enthusiasts who came by our booth just how much they meant to us.

The last day of Comic-Con is always bittersweet. The air buzzes with positivity, inspiration, and camaraderie, but in the back of your mind, you know it may be another year before you see some of these friends, old and new. Sure, we always have the Internet, but there's something special about meeting in real life that can’t compare to flipping through a portfolio of sketches, laughing out loud with your peers, and supporting artists’ hard work right then and there.

There was rarely a moment when one of our seven kiosks wasn’t occupied by an artist. Young or old, newbie or professional, digital or traditional, the chance to sit down and create art was difficult to pass up with inspiration coming from every direction.


A view from the deviantART booth, looking out at the convention floor.

With a handful of deviantART staffers standing by to answer questions, hand out swag, or grin with delight when they met a deviant they’d been following for years, every one of us walked away from the convention with hearts full of memories we'll never forget.

It was great seeing families come up to our booth, excited, wanting to share the community with their kids. Usually it's the other way around — teenagers trying to explain deviantART to their parents. There was some of the latter, but primarily what we noticed was the older generation wanting to pass the community on to their kids, or even grandchildren in some cases.


spyed watches a young pre-deviant use deviantART muro to draw a landscape of his favorite game.

Every year deviantART is a part of Comic-Con, we learn more about how to make the next even better. This year, we had more panels, more schwag to hand out, more ways to make the artists in the alley feel the love. And we have a whole year ahead to come up with how awesome we know Comic-Con 2013 will be.

And don't worry -- we'll soon be releasing video of every aspect deviantART could capture on film, so you can experience what it was like to attend from the comfort of your home.  Get excited for some exclusive interviews with artists, insider tips and tricks from our hosted panels, and so much more.


Not all Poison Ivys at Comic-Con were cosplayers. Leeahd took the time to make this villain digital.

As we mentioned in an earlier recap, we’re looking for ideas on how to make meeting up with large groups of deviants even more frequent. You may have read about our Paris deviantMEET, our London deviantMEET, and our first-ever Gallery Show in London, and we want to hear from you.

- What conventions should we go to in the future?
- What towns does deviantART need to visit next to hold a deviantMEET?
- What sorts of get-togethers would be perfect for deviantART to show up and crash?
- Please leave your ideas in the comments below!


All deviantART staffers in attendance take a moment to pose beneath our rotating sign!

Much was achieved with our sponsorship of Artists' Alley; however, none of it would have been possible without makepictures and techgnotic. Thanks to their tireless efforts and passion, we were able to further deviantART's commitment to entertaining, empowering, and inspiring the artist in all of us.

Ultimately, though, we need to sincerely thank each and every deviant and/or art lover who stopped by our booth and warmed our hearts with tales of their artistic journey.  It's thanks to them, and deviants around the world, that deviantART is able to provide an environment of creative integrity and purpose.

~Heidi and LaurenKitsune


Read more:
Comic-Con: Day 1
Comic-Con: Day 2
Comic-Con: Day 3
Comic-Con: Day 4

On Sunday, the 4th and final day of San Diego Comic-Con, we were able to keep the love flowing to show the artists and art enthusiasts who came by our booth just how much they meant to us.

~$Heidi
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