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Similar Deviations
realized for a 30 cm large tatoo

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
Superfamily: Tyrannosauroidea
Family: Tyrannosauridae
Subfamily: Tyrannosaurinae
Genus: Tyrannosaurus
Osborn, 1905
Species
T. rex (type)
Osborn, 1905
Synonyms
Manospondylus
Cope, 1892
Dynamosaurus
Osborn, 1905
?Nanotyrannus
Bakker, Williams & Currie, 1988
Stygivenator
Olshevsky, 1995
Dinotyrannus
Olshevsky, 1995
Tyrannosaurus (pronounced /tɨˌrænəˈsɔːrəs/ or /taɪˌrænoʊˈsɔːrəs/, meaning 'tyrant lizard';) is a genus of theropod dinosaur. The famous species Tyrannosaurus rex ('rex' meaning 'king' in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is a fixture in popular culture around the world. It lived throughout what is now western North America, with a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils of T. rex are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the last three million years of the Cretaceous Period, approximately 68 to 65 million years ago; it was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist prior to the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event.
Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to the large and powerful hindlimbs, Tyrannosaurus forelimbs were small, though unusually powerful for their size, and bore two primary digits, along with a possible third vestigial digit. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded T. rex in size, it was the largest known tyrannosaurid and one of the largest known land predators, measuring up to 13 metres (43 ft) in length,[1] up to 4 metres (13 ft) tall at the hips,[2] and up to 6.8 metric tons (7.5 short tons) in weight.[3] By far the largest carnivore in its environment, T. rex may have been an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, although some experts have suggested it was primarily a scavenger.
More than 30 specimens of T. rex have been identified, some of which are nearly complete skeletons. Soft tissue and proteins have been reported in at least one of these specimens. The abundance of fossil material has allowed significant research into many aspects of its biology, including life history and biomechanics. The feeding habits, physiology and potential speed of T. rex are a few subjects of debate. Its taxonomy is also controversial, with some scientists considering Tarbosaurus bataar from Asia to represent a second species of Tyrannosaurus and others maintaining Tarbosaurus as a separate genus. Several other genera of North American tyrannosaurids have also been synonymized with Tyrannosaurus.
Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest land carnivores of all time; the largest complete specimen, FMNH PR2081 ("Sue"), measured 12.8 metres (42 ft) long, and was 4.0 metres (13 ft) tall at the hips.[2] Mass estimates have varied widely over the years, from more than 7.2 metric tons (7.9 short tons),[4] to less than 4.5 metric tons (5.0 short tons),[5][6] with most modern estimates ranging between 5.4 and 6.8 metric tons (6.0 and 7.5 short tons).[7][8][9][3] Although Tyrannosaurus rex was larger than the well known Jurassic theropod Allosaurus, it was slightly smaller than Cretaceous carnivores Spinosaurus and Giganotosaurus.[10][11]
The neck of T. rex formed a natural S-shaped curve like that of other theropods, but was short and muscular to support the massive head. The forelimbs were long thought to bear only two digits, but there is an unpublished report of a third, vestigial digit in one specimen.[12] In contrast the hind limbs were among the longest in proportion to body size of any theropod. The tail was heavy and long, sometimes containing over forty vertebrae, in order to balance the massive head and torso. To compensate for the immense bulk of the animal, many bones throughout the skeleton were hollow, reducing its weight without significant loss of strength.[1]
The largest known T. rex skulls measure up to 5 feet (1.5 m) in length.[13] Large fenestrae (openings) in the skull reduced weight and provided areas for muscle attachment, as in all carnivorous theropods. But in other respects Tyrannosaurus’ skull was significantly different from those of large non-tyrannosauroid theropods. It was extremely wide at the rear but had a narrow snout, allowing unusually good binocular vision.[14][15] The skull bones were massive and the nasals and some other bones were fused, preventing movement between them; but many were pneumatized (contained a "honeycomb" of tiny air spaces) which may have made the bones more flexible as well as lighter. These and other skull-strengthening features are part of the tyrannosaurid trend towards an increasingly powerful bite, which easily surpassed that of all non-tyrannosaurids.[16][17][18] The tip of the upper jaw was U-shaped (most non-tyrannosauroid carnivores had V-shaped upper jaws), which increased the amount of tissue and bone a tyrannosaur could rip out with one bite, although it also increased the stresses on the front teeth.[19][20]


Life restoration of a Tyrannosaurus rex.
The teeth of T. rex displayed marked heterodonty (differences in shape).[21][1] The premaxillary teeth at the front of the upper jaw were closely packed, D-shaped in cross-section, had reinforcing ridges on the rear surface, were incisiform (their tips were chisel-like blades) and curved backwards. The D-shaped cross-section, reinforcing ridges and backwards curve reduced the risk that the teeth would snap when Tyrannosaurus bit and pulled. The remaining teeth were robust, like "lethal bananas" rather than daggers; more widely spaced and also had reinforcing ridges.[22] Those in the upper jaw were larger than those in all but the rear of the lower jaw. The largest found so far is estimated to have been 30 centimetres (12 in) long including the root when the animal was alive, making it the largest tooth of any carnivorous dinosaur.
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"The Second Lunch"

"Ciro" - Scipionyx samniticus eating its second prey,
a Derasmosaurus.

acrylics by brush and airbrush on cardboard

8,4 x 11,88 inches / 21 x 29,7 cm


Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
(unranked): Coelurosauria
Genus: Scipionyx
dal Sasso & Signore, 1998
Species
S. samniticus dal Sasso & Signore, 1998

Scipionyx is a very small genus of theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Italy, around 113 million years ago. There has been only one skeleton discovered, which is notable for the preservation of soft tissue and internal organs. It is the fossil of a juvenile only a few inches long. Adult size is estimated to be 2 metres (approx. 6 feet). The name Scipionyx comes from the Latin word Scipio and the Greek onyx, meaning "Scipio's claw", and for Scipione Breislak, the geologist who wrote the first description of the formation in which the fossil was found. The specific name samniticus means "From the Samnium", the Latin name of the region around Pietraroja. The specimen is also popularly nicknamed "Skippy, or "Doggy"
Scipionyx was discovered in the spring of 1981 by Giovanni Todesco, an amateur paleontologist, near Pietraroja, approximately 50 kilometers from Naples. The fossils were preserved in the Pietraroia limestone formation, well known for unusually well-preserved fossils. Todesco thought the remains belonged to that of a fossil bird. Unaware of the importance of his findings, he kept the strange fossil in the basement of his house until 1992 when he met two paleontologists, Cristiano dal Sasso of the Natural History Museum of Milan and Marco Signore of the University of Naples Federico II, who identified it as the first Italian dinosaur. The magazine Oggi gave the tiny dinosaur the nickname Ciro, a typical Neapolitan name. In 1998, Scipionyx made the front cover of Nature.

Scipionyx is classified as a coelurosaurian theropod. Because the only remains recovered belong to that of a juvenile, it has not been possible to assign this dinosaur to a more specific group. Coelurosaur characteristics included a sacrum (a series of vertebrae that attach to the hips) longer than in other dinosaurs, a tail stiffened towards the tip, and a bowed ulna (lower arm bone). The tibia (lower leg bone) is also characteristically longer than the femur (upper leg bone) in coelurosaurs. Fossil evidence indicates that most coelurosaurs were probably feathered.
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A2. 0,3 mm HB pencil.
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some pterodactyls are cleaning up Trex theet
micro graphite HB

Tyrannosaurus
Fossil range: 68.5–65.5 Ma
Late Cretaceous
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Superorder: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Theropoda
Superfamily: Tyrannosauroidea
Family: Tyrannosauridae
Subfamily: Tyrannosaurinae
Genus: Tyrannosaurus
Osborn, 1905
Species
T. rex (type)
Osborn, 1905
Synonyms
Manospondylus
Cope, 1892
Dynamosaurus
Osborn, 1905
?Nanotyrannus
Bakker, Williams & Currie, 1988
Stygivenator
Olshevsky, 1995
Dinotyrannus
Olshevsky, 1995
Tyrannosaurus (pronounced /tɨˌrænəˈsɔːrəs/ or /taɪˌrænoʊˈsɔːrəs/, meaning 'tyrant lizard';) is a genus of theropod dinosaur. The famous species Tyrannosaurus rex ('rex' meaning 'king' in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is a fixture in popular culture around the world. It lived throughout what is now western North America, with a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils of T. rex are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the last three million years of the Cretaceous Period, approximately 68 to 65 million years ago; it was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist prior to the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event.
Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to the large and powerful hindlimbs, Tyrannosaurus forelimbs were small, though unusually powerful for their size, and bore two primary digits, along with a possible third vestigial digit. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded T. rex in size, it was the largest known tyrannosaurid and one of the largest known land predators, measuring up to 13 metres (43 ft) in length,[1] up to 4 metres (13 ft) tall at the hips,[2] and up to 6.8 metric tons (7.5 short tons) in weight.[3] By far the largest carnivore in its environment, T. rex may have been an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, although some experts have suggested it was primarily a scavenger.
More than 30 specimens of T. rex have been identified, some of which are nearly complete skeletons. Soft tissue and proteins have been reported in at least one of these specimens. The abundance of fossil material has allowed significant research into many aspects of its biology, including life history and biomechanics. The feeding habits, physiology and potential speed of T. rex are a few subjects of debate. Its taxonomy is also controversial, with some scientists considering Tarbosaurus bataar from Asia to represent a second species of Tyrannosaurus and others maintaining Tarbosaurus as a separate genus. Several other genera of North American tyrannosaurids have also been synonymized with Tyrannosaurus.
[link]

Pterosauria - Pterodactyloidea
Flying Reptiles
Pterodactyloidae

This advanced from whitin the pterosaurs lived durig the Late Jurassic and Late Cretaceous. Shorter tails and longer necks then there ancestors, however the number of vertebrae was equal to them, the brain was more developed. Some genera developed a crest on the head in order to improve the stearing during flight, the teeth are reduced and sometimes disappeared.
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All three paintings together at last!
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really old piece of Fabio pastori paleoart
ecoline with airbrush on card board

Marine Reptiles
Rulers of the acient seas

During the Mesozoicperiod when dinosaurs ruled life on land, sea reptiles were the absolute rulers of the seas and oceans. Some of these animals were 14 meters in length Plesiosaurs appeared during the Triassic, later they split up into two superfamilies, the Plesiosauroidae that looked liked dolfines with lang necks en snakelike heads, and the Pliosauroidae with there stubby body's, short necks en crocodile-like heads.

Both superfamilies lived troughout the Mesozoic period. Plesiosaurs are from origin landanimals, which adapted to live in the sea, there legs changhed in to swimmingpeddals and instead of five they developed ten finger- and toobones. They moved trough the water by flapping there peddals up and down, so it looked as if they flew trough the water as birds .

The pelvis and shoulderbones were deformed to massive boneplates, a unique characteristic for plesiosaurs. Ichtyosaurs were the highest specialised marine reptiles of there time, they were verry similar to modern dolphins. Thanks to their build they could swim with a speed of 40 km/h. Ichtyosaurs used tunlike the plesiosaurs their tail fin for movement.

They were so adapted to water that they couldn't go on shore anymore. Ichthyosaurs were viviparous animals and they lived for more then 100 milion years on earth. The earliest fossil records of ichthyosaurs are dated from the Early Triassic and the latest from the Middle Cretaceous, the greatest diversity among these animals appeared during the Jurassic.

Mosasaurs were flesh eating land animals that returned to sea to take over the gape that the ichthyosaurs left after they disappeared. They quickly spread and evolved into twenty different families with more than seventy genera.

There lifespan was a relatively short one, twenty-five million years after their entrance and even before the end of the Cretaceous they were already disappeared from the Earth leaving their place to marine mammals.
[link]
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a drawing of Giganotosaurus, this is still one of my favorite dinosaurs. and I wanted to draw him again for soooooo long.

Giganotosaurus means Giant South Wind Lizard, it was discovered in Argentina, South America in 1995. Giganotosaurus was larger then T-Rex, but not much larger. also, unlike T-Rex, Giganotosaurus had a smaller brain, and narrower teeth and skull. this made it clear that its jaws where for slicing flesh, as opposed to crushing bone like T-Rex.

Giganotosaurus roamed the earth about 97 Million Years Ago during the Cenomanian stage of the Late Cretaceous Period.
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Sittin' down, chillaxin
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Varios Velociraptor grandes le dejan el paso libre a un Saurocerastus.
(Pueden ver otro Saurocerastus aqui: [link] y si, me lo he sacado de la manga)

A pack of large Velociraptor retire when a Saurocerastus comes along.
(You can see another Saurocerastus here: [link] and yes, I invented the critter)IF I GET A COMMENT ABOUT HOW MY RAPTORS LACK FEATHERS OR HAVE WEIRD WRISTS, I'LL GO INTO A KILLING SPREE! :P
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Proceratosaurus=before ceratosaurus
Codename: dwarf dragon
Diet:carnivore
Lenght:3,7 m
Height: 1,6
Weight: 40-77 Kilograms
Middle Jurassic, 169-164 mya
Area:England

Not all dinosaurs are wery famous and proceratosaurs is one of them. Bred as on of the first dinosaurs it was brought to the park in a early stage. Proceratosaurs are bad temperd but not as aggresive as many other carnivores.


Proceratosaurus lives both on Isla Nublar and Isla Sorna

Dangerous

First Apperance: Jurassic Park (1993)

Jurassic Park (C) Universal Pictures
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