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I didn't get as good a likeness of Arwen as I wanted.
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:icondonotuseplz::iconmyartplz:
© Karolina Węgrzyn
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"Snowflakes were lazily drifting before his eyes. He wanted to reach out, to catch them, to hold them in his hand, but... He had only one hand. The attempts to hold his shawl with the stump nearly ended with the garment falling. All he could do was to reach out with the stump or...

Put his face towards it, as towards the Sun"


From "The First Snow" [link]
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Płatki śniegu leniwie przepływały przed oczami. Chciał wyciągnąć rękę, złapać je, trzymać w dłoni, ale... Miał tylko jedną dłoń. Próby podtrzymania szala kikutem omal nie skończyły się upadkiem szaty na śnieg. Cóż, pozostało wyciągnąć kikut, lub...

Wystawić twarz, jak do słońca.


Z "Pierwszego śniegu" [link]
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[Painter 9.5, tablet.]
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This work was created for a duel about secondary charachters of "The Lord of the Rings" by Tolkien. It was finished afterwards. I tried to depict Glorfindel's piece, purity, nobleness and courage.
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As told in "The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen", Aragorn in his twentieth year met Arwen for the first time in Rivendell, where he lived under Elrond's protection. Arwen, then over 2700 years old, had recently returned to her father's home after living for a while with her grandmother Lady Galadriel in Lórien. Aragorn fell in love with Arwen at first sight. Some thirty years later, the two were reunited in Lórien. Arwen reciprocated Aragorn's love, and on the mound of Cerin Amroth they committed themselves to marry one another.
After the War of the Ring, Aragorn became king of Arnor and Gondor. Arwen arrived at Minas Tirith, and they were married.
Her few appearances in the book suggest that Arwen is a minor character in The Lord of the Rings; but she serves as inspiration and motivation for Aragorn, who, as Elrond stipulated, must become King of both Arnor and Gondor before he could wed her.
The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen relates that Arwen had a son, Eldarion, and at least two unnamed daughters by Aragorn. In F.A. 121, one year after Aragorn's death, at the age of 2901 she gave up her life at Cerin Amroth.

:thumb209201679:
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Callligraphy (tengwar) by Morelen www.flickr.com/photos/32039090…

"All That is Gold Does Not Glitter" is a poem written by J. R. R. Tolkien for his fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. It alludes to an integral part of the plot. The poem reads:

All that is gold does not glitter,Not all those who wander are lost;The old that is strong does not wither,Deep roots are not reached by the frost.From the ashes a fire shall be woken,A light from the shadows shall spring;Renewed shall be blade that was broken,The crownless again shall be king.[1]

The poem appears twice in The Lord of the Rings' first volume, The Fellowship of the Ring. It appears first in Chapter Ten, "Strider", in Gandalf's letter to Frodo Baggins in Bree, before they know that Strider (Aragorn) is the subject of the verse. It is repeated by Bilbo at the Council of Elrond. He whispers to Frodo that he wrote it many years before, when Aragorn first revealed who he was.[2]

In Peter Jackson's adaptation of The Lord of the Rings for film, the poem appears in The Return of the King, when Arwen recites the last four lines of the poem as her fatherElrond prepares to reforge the shards of Narsil for Aragorn. In the 1981 BBC radio dramatisation, the entire poem is heard in its original context, the letter left at Bree by Gandalf.

The way appearance displays reality in our world is largely inverted in Middle-earth with respect to the subject matter of the poem. The first line is a variant and rearrangement of the proverb "All that glitters is not gold", known primarily from Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, resulting in a proposition bearing a completely different meaning: Aragorn is vastly more important than he looks. The second line emphasises the importance of the Rangers, suspiciously viewed as wanderers or vagabonds by those the Rangers actually protect from evil. Lines three and four emphasise the endurance of Aragorn's royal lineage, while five and six emphasizes its renewal. They can also be seen to represent a spark of hope during a time of despair and danger. Line seven refers to the sword Narsil. Line eight foreshadows Aragorn's rise to be king of kingless Gondor and vanished Arnor.

Older editions of The Lord of the Rings indexed the poem as "The Riddle of Strider". From the 50th anniversary edition of 2005 on, the new, enlarged index by Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull list it as "All that is gold does not glitter".

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Female figure by Lamorien lamorien.deviantart.com/art/De…
Callligraphy Title by Morelen www.flickr.com/photos/32039090…

Ai! laurië lantar lassi súrinen,
yéni únótimë ve rámar aldaron!
Yéni ve lintë yuldar avánier
mi oromardi lisse-miruvóreva
Andúnë pella, Vardo tellumar
nu luini yassen tintilar i eleni
ómaryo airetári-lírinen.

Sí man i yulma nin enquantuva?

An sí Tintallë Varda Oiolossëo
ve fanyar máryat Elentári ortanë,
ar ilyë tier undulávë lumbulë;
ar sindanóriello caita mornië
i falmalinnar imbë met, ar hísië
untúpa Calaciryo míri oialë.
Sí vanwa ná, Rómello vanwa, Valimar!

Namárië! Nai hiruvalyë Valimar.
Nai elyë hiruva. Namárië!

The song translates into English thus:

Ah! like gold fall the leaves in the wind, 
long years numberless as the wings of trees! 
The years have passed like swift draughts 
of the sweet mead in lofty halls beyond the West, 
beneath the blue vaults of Varda 
wherein the stars tremble in the song of her voice, holy and queenly. 

Who now shall refill the cup for me? 

For now the Kindler, Varda, the Queen of the Stars, 
from Mount Everwhite has uplifted her hands like clouds, 
and all paths are drowned deep in shadow; 
and out of a grey country darkness lies on the foaming waves between us,
and mist covers the jewels of Calacirya for ever. 
Now lost, lost to those from the East is Valimar!

Farewell! Maybe thou shalt find Valimar. 
Maybe even thou shalt find it. Farewell!

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©2010 Jon Hodgson

Dwarf adventurer seeking permission to travel in the lands of King Dáin for The One Ring rpg from Sophisticated Games and Cubicle 7.

"To most denizens of the Lonely Mountain, taking part in the making of future splendours is enough to fill their life with purpose. To some, the memory of even greater halls still lost to the enemy fills their heart with longing and bitterness, driving out any interest in the concerns of other folks. These restless spirits become emissaries and adventurers, and their wandering carries the name of Erebor to many foreign realms."

Artrage, Painter, PS.
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Inspired by my favorite book, my favorite movie and my favorite actors.
Hope you love it ;)

Thanks to everybody for yours comments and favs! :+fav:
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The computer colored version of Tinuviel's dance under the stars from Tolkien's Silmarillion
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An entry for LJ's lotr_community's recent art challenge, the text should be self-explanatory.

Sorrowfully they cast loose the funeral boat: there Boromir lay, restful, peaceful, gliding upon the bosom of the flowing water. The stream took him while they held their own boat back with their paddles. He floated by them, and slowly his boat departed, waning to a dark spot against the golden light; and then suddenly it vanished. Rauros roared on unchanging. The River had taken Boromir son of Denethor, and he was not seen again in Minas Tirith, standing as he used to stand upon the White Tower in the morning.

(The Two Towers)

Credits:

:iconkuschelirmel-stock: [link]

:iconburtn: [link]

:iconmaureenolder: [link]
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