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Inspired by Super Mario RPG, Star Ocean: The Second Story, and many more of my fondest memories playing role-playing games as a kid. These are the kinds of characters I would design if I was making a mecha-themed fantasy RPG. My goals were to be funny, draw inventive designs with a lot of personality, and be a bit bolder and more unusual with color usage. Thanks goes to Paul Segal for suggesting the "Gems of Castelaria" name.

This new series of submissions has a few new characters added to the roster, as well as reworkings of previous designs. (Yes, I know there wouldn't be staples visible in ALL of these spreads, but I like the staples.)

Which ones are your favorite?


Villains: [link]

Enemies and Others: [link]
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Inspired by Super Mario RPG, Star Ocean: The Second Story, and many more of my fondest memories playing role-playing games as a kid. These are the kinds of characters I would design if I was making a mecha-themed fantasy RPG. My goals were to be funny, draw inventive designs with a lot of personality, and be a bit bolder and more unusual with color usage. Thanks goes to Paul Segal for suggesting the "Gems of Castelaria" name.

This new series of submissions has a few new characters added to the roster, as well as reworkings of previous designs. (Yes, I know there wouldn't be staples visible in ALL of these spreads, but I like the staples.)

Which ones are your favorite?

Heroes: [link]

Enemies and Others: [link]
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Inspired by Super Mario RPG, Star Ocean: The Second Story, and many more of my fondest memories playing role-playing games as a kid. These are the kinds of characters I would design if I was making a mecha-themed fantasy RPG. My goals were to be funny, draw inventive designs with a lot of personality, and be a bit bolder and more unusual with color usage. Thanks goes to Paul Segal for suggesting the "Gems of Castelaria" name.

This new series of submissions has a few new characters added to the roster, as well as reworkings of previous designs. (Yes, I know there wouldn't be staples visible in ALL of these spreads, but I like the staples.)

Which ones are your favorite?


Heroes: [link]

Villains: [link]
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Mecha with harpoon/spear.

For Cross-Fate.

If background text seems familiar; it is inspired by BigBang's cover of their "Always" EP mini-album. Always thought it looked cool and like a sheet of decals.
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Threw this together real quick to highlight the three favorite mecha I've made so far.

Not saying I don't like my Frame Crash designs, but these three definitely stand out from the rest.

Daeg Hagal (Right) - This ol' mecha first started out as a Franken called "Red Feng". That later evolved into the franken "Daeg Hagal" and eventually into a 3D model. The Daeg Hagal is a general purpose prototype that does best on the ground with superior handling. Its armaments are plenty, though they're all typically designed around a balanced performance. Its typical load-out consists of a shield, beam sabers and a multifunctional rifle.

Reyrand (Left) - This is another iteration of the Red Feng mecha, though it's a "variant of a variant". This is based off of a second Red Feng franken, whose backstory was it could phase-warp weapons from a satellite in space right into its hands or general vicinity. This literally allowed it to have hundreds of weapons at its disposal... all of which were swords. Let's face it, put a sword in a mecha's hand, and it becomes cool. Give it hundreds of different sword options? Cooler. And you thought the Exia had a lot of swords.

Here the Reyrand is displayed with its basic load-out; shields on its shoulders with newtype bit-like weapons mounted in them, a pair of swords on its side (and though not visible, six throwable beam sabers on its backside) and a standard sword that it's using to look all knightly and regal.

Altair (Center) - This one's a more recent model I made from scratch; obviously, I haven't even released its design sheet yet! This one isn't based off of any old designs or models, though it does take some design elements from the old Duke 3D model (Namely, a pair of slide-out reactors). It's also one of the few I've designed a fully detailed cockpit for, which I'll put onto the design sheet for view. The Altair is a high mobility performance unit; it features powerful thrusters made for ground maneuvering and a selection of close and mid-range weapons that make full use of that mobility. It'll also have several add-on options called "Assist Gears", when I get around to making them.

And that's about it. I pretty much threw this together for the hell of it to see how the three of them would look put together; mainly because I plan on throwing all three of them into a single story (They are kinda just floatin' out there with no connection to any of my other models, after all).
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Completed Color version: [link]

Because France had fallen with such shocking speed, only in retrospect to the early years of WWII does the origin of the Charlemagne raise eyebrows among the Allies. Had the basic technology behind the machine been more proven before the outbreak of war, perhaps then they would have detected a major conspiracy which directly fueled the Nazi war machine, essentially jump-starting Germany’s own Pzf program. Hitler’s boisterous proclamations that the basic technology behind walking armor was Germanic in origin, is mostly truthful, (though the true birthplace of the top secret ancient automata blueprints fall more under the larger sphere of Germanic influence). The fact that the 3rd Reich’s sudden manifestation of armored colossus in 1939 would never have happened without the aid of France’s (then) superior industrial infrastructure is as much an item of secrecy for the French government as it is for Germany’s.

This is not to imply that French Industry was complicit with Nazi Germany’s aims of conquering Europe, rather it was victim to a plot whose ramifications could not possibly have been envisaged from the perspective of France during the inter-war period. From their vantage point, the French had miraculously, if conveniently, intercepted plans for incredible new technology that could potentially ensure lasting peace for the war ravaged country. If they chose to invest in the project, they would have a crucial head start over all other major world powers in the coming era. The fact that the plans came from a German source was irrelevant, being that Germany was in severe economic depression at the time, and had no industrial infrastructure capable of implementing such an ambitious design, and in the unlikely event that they did, had nowhere near sufficient resources for mass production. So, oblivious to the extent of the ambition and insanity of those responsible for the deliberate leak, France took the bait and counted itself not simply fortunate, but deserving of the boon in lieu of all the suffering only recently ended, thinking only with pride of a completed prototype waving a massive tricolore beneath the Triumphal Arch on 14th July.

So while France exhausted crucial time and massive resources developing a very powerful new weapon system whose tactical ability would be rendered obsolete just a few years later by Blitzkrieg tactics, Germany went back to basics and adapted the French tech breakthroughs to much smaller simpler mechs that could travel farther over land, and even be transported by larger vehicles w/ relative ease. What later came to be regarded as the Pygmy Pzfs, in lieu of their much larger offspring. From the start, Germany’s greatest asset in this still secret arms race was its intellectual foresight for the new machine’s tactical usage and ultimate potential. In the beginning of its Pzf development, Germany was less concerned w/ creating the perfect weapon from the outset, and more focused on the proper large-scale uses of such a weapon. Tactical application was the thing. Perfecting individual models would come later, after German Industry had time to rebuild. Motivation and training of Pzf units could be honed while their machines could yet not. Hence German Pzfs started small, while their creators dreamed big, and crews trained hard.

Of course, once any weapon sees more widespread use, it's only a matter of time before the enemy builds their own better designs. So, as with tanks, mechs began to grow larger again, capable of carrying more powerful weapons. This time, however, with greater consideration to speed and tactical usage. The tech became more standardized, and parts more interchangeable. Gradually, improvements were made in ease of pilot control, agility, and adaptability, even as they grew larger. American and Russian designers in particular learned how to strike a fair balance between enabling complex functionality and expedient manufacture. In contrast to mech production at the height of WWII, the Charlemagne’s longer meandering development cycle rendered a machine which was far more luxurious in many ways. Better crew survivability being a virtue less characteristic among the more ubiquitous mechs of the war.

The initial Mark I model of the Charlemagne, like most of the Allies first attempts at a medium mech, was constructed in the “jouster” configuration of a mostly anthropomorphic layout excepting one unarticulated weapon arm. In other words, having one humanoid arm, with a rotating shoulder, elbow, and a hand capable of clasping assorted weapons and tools, and an opposite arm dedicated to a single fixed weapon with the bare minimum of joints to allow weapon operation and aiming.

For it’s right arm, the Charlemagne Mk.I carried the same short barreled 75 mm ABS SA 35 howitzer found mounted in the hull of a Char B-1 tank. Jouster mechs, while both cheaper and faster to produce, sacrificed a large degree of tactical versatility, which is considered the primary strength of anthro mechs. Beyond a Jouster layout, the Mk.I Charlemagne was distinguished most easily by an asymmetrical hull layout, with the driver’s compartment and vision block clearly jutting on the upper left, and a machine gun mount on the right front armor plate. Additionally, a heavy armor apron was often worn on the front plate of the pelvic section, which was later omitted on the Mark II in favor of additional side protection in the form of 2 skirt plates protecting the hip joints.

Both versions featured riveted body construction with hulls very reminiscent of it’s armored cousin, the Char B-1. There were, however, some cast armor components present on both designs of the Charlemagne; mainly the head, and midriff. Both having been improved towards the end of the of the Charlemagne’s development, and thus borrowing cast armor techniques used on the more modern SOMUA tank, which shares its turret design with the Char B-1.

The Mark II, shown here, was the world’s first true functional medium anthro mech, enjoying the full use of two arms and hands rather than one. The hull mounted machine gun is gone, and peculiarly relocated to the head, above the sighting equipment. The odd head MG, first implemented on the Mk.II, was only imitated much later in the war among customized ‘premium’ head models. The key advantage of this first head mounted MG was a decent angle of depression and exceptional degree of elevation, altogether amounting in over 100 degrees of up/down movement, useful for dislodging entrenched infantry and indispensible against low flying aircraft. The Mk.II’s matching shoulder sections had a mostly cubic shape, in contrast to the sloped shoulder armor of the Mk.I. The boxy shoulders offered less protection than sloped armor, but were much easier to mass produce. This questionable design decision was made in order to counter balance the much higher cost of manufacturing two fully articulated arms, rather than just one.

Although most of the Charlemagne's early tech solutions were abandoned in favor of more efficient and economical innovations by all mechs built after 1940, it's basic design DNA can still be detected in all succeeding mechs of WWII. Though never produced in sufficient numbers (or properly deployed ‘en masse’) to make a significant impact on France's military performance in the early war years, the Charlemagne is nevertheless the an unsung Grandfather to all WWII mechs.
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Armament:
Head: 7.5 mm Reibel machine gun
Right Hand: 75 mm howitzer
Left hand: 47 mm cannon + 7.5 mm MG combo weapon.

Crew: 4
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History:

When the French designed Charlemagne first appeared in the mid 1930s, it could easily be considered the most powerful specimen of walking armor in the world. Like the Char B-1 Bis, with which it shared both a myriad of mechanical components and factory space, the Charlemagne was very advanced for its era. During the Invasion of France, even the Pzf IV Seigmund, Germany’s best walking panzer of the time, had little hope against the much heavier armed and armored Charlemagne. France’s precious few defending Charlemagnes instead fell prey to other forces, such as artillery, and dive bombers, as much as native issues like poor tactical usage and insufficiently trained crews. Regrettably, the average French Military Commander’s understanding of rapid armored warfare was lacking enough with regard to conventional tanks, let alone something so cutting edge and tactically nuanced as a walking one.

Only in retrospect to the early years of WWII does the origin of the Charlemagne raise eyebrows among the Allies. Had the new technology been more in the international spotlight before the outbreak of war, perhaps then the Allies would have detected a major conspiracy which directly fueled the Nazi war machine, essentially jump-starting Germany’s own Pzf (panzer zu fuss) program. Hitler’s boisterous proclamations that the technology of walking armor was Germanic in origin, is mostly truthful. But the 3rd Reich’s sudden manifestation of armored colossus in 1939 would never have happened without the pioneering of France’s (then) superior arms industry that culminated in the Charlemagne weapon platform.

Though it would have been better to ask in 1939, the question remains, “If walking tanks are a German born concept, how could the French produce something like the Charlemagne before Germany unveiled its first pygmy Pzfs, of half the size and complexity?” The simple answer is that the tech was intentionally leaked by German sources to France. The next question then, is why should they? Why would Germany share plans for a war-changing weapon with a potential enemy?

Knowing that they had very limited resources post WWI, German war industry leaders agreed it would be best to see what happened when a country w/ much stronger assets had exposure to their secret blueprints. Let someone else bear the burden of developing a brand new technology from scratch! Difficult issues like power transmission to the legs, control interfaces, and articulate joint functionality were all resolved by French ingenuity and capital. As evidenced by the well-intentioned but ill-conceived Maginot line, France had a penchant for sinking huge sums into wild military ideas –desperate to ensure peace and security in the wake of the horrific First World War.

While France exhausted crucial time and massive resources developing a machine whose tactical statistics would be rendered obsolete just a few years later by Blitzkrieg tactics, Germany went back to basics and adapted the French breakthroughs to much smaller simpler mechs that could travel farther over land, and even be transported by larger vehicles with relative ease. What later came to be regarded as the Pygmy Pzfs, in the shadow of their much larger offspring. From the start, Germany’s greatest asset in this furtive arms race was its intellectual foresight for the new machine’s proper tactical usage and ultimate potential. In the beginning of Pzf development, Germany was less concerned with creating the perfect weapon from the outset, and more focused on the proper large-scale uses of such a weapon. Strategic application was the thing. Perfecting individual models would come later, after German industry had some time to rebuild. Training and advanced logistics of unit movement could be honed while their machines could yet not. Hence German Pzfs started small, while their creators dreamed big, and crews trained hard… under theoretical military doctrine hardly newer to the world than their curious bipedal mounts.

Though it was a revelation of new technology back in the 1930s, even then, the Charlemagne wasn’t without sizeable flaws -the worst of these being not just low tactical mobility, but also inferior strategic mobility. Not only was the vehicle ponderously slow, but it also suffered from very limited range. Short range means the frequent need to refuel, hobbling operational ability. Like its ally Britain, France’s early approach to armor design was mired in World War I style thinking, what more progressive tacticians would refer to as “trench mind”. Charlemagne was never designed for deep penetrating maneuvers, it was instead conceived more for defense rather than offense.

Although most of the Charlemagne's early tech solutions were abandoned in favor of more efficient and economical innovations, it's basic design DNA can still be detected in all successive mechs of WWII. Though never produced in sufficient numbers (or properly deployed ‘en masse’) to make a significant impact on France's military performance in the early war years, the Charlemagne is nevertheless the unsung Grandfather to all other WWII mecha.

Out of retirement:

When Hamilton’s squad of "AWOL Allies" [link] find themselves in France at the spearhead of the Allied invasion, elements of the French resistance assist them in liberating a hidden stash of Charlemagnes stored in a secret bunker beneath the Maginot line, unused and still waiting for a frontal attack that never happened. They're old and outdated, but as an unofficial rogue unit, the gang will take whatever they can get. If unassigned to a combat unit, one could always sell such vintage war materiel on the thriving black market, or exchange them for more modern options.

Optimally, with some effort on the part of experienced engineers, the Charlemagne could be upgraded with modern equipment and components (both being engineering for universal fittings) to create a machine that remains respectably capable on the battlefields of 1945, against all but the heaviest monsters. In which case, the rare specimens are certainly no worse if not outright superior to the massively produced Big Joe and Kirov, being still slower than both, but remaining the best armored in its class.

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Texture from:
Cgtextures.com [link]
cgkkies.com [link]

For additional info and schematics: [link]
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My 20 minute entry for [link]

I'm in a bit of a slump, so i guess I couldn't resist haha.
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Advance and fire
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made that for fun.the suspension is a good idea and the proportions look good to me too. if you have to go into conflikt,it should at least be comfortable.
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