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Another sketch from school. I was really bored so this one is a bit more refined..
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Evening speedy. Some Dale pikemen/swordsmen and Bardian archers kicking some Horsemaster of Rhun ass ;) For TLD of course.
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Another concept from this weekend. I liked this one and I was bored as hell so I finished this one a bit more. Knights of Arnor are troops recruitable from Rivendell Elves. (they're Dunedain of course.)
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"During the Angmar War, what was left of the ancient realm of Arnor was under attack. While not ignoring the North-Kingdom, King Eärnil II had trouble of his own, and could not spare any of his troops to send North. It took long until King felt his South-Kingdom was secured, and he could fulfill his promise to aid the northern part. In Autumn 1973 messages arrived to Gondor, and King learnt that the Witch-king was preparing for the final blow against Arthedain. King sent his son Eärnur north. Though his fleet sailed rapidly, he was not in time to save Arthedain or Arvedui, its last king. But his massive fleet - it filled Mithlond, Harlond and Forlond - was hailed by the Men that had survived the last defeat, and the Elves also. To Gondor's standards, the expeditionary force was mediocre in size. It did, however, include cavalry from Rhovanion, which would prove useful on the wide lands of the North.

The Elves of Lindon and the remnant of the northern Dúnedain joined Eärnur's army and the combined forces marched against the Witch-king. He now lived in Fornost, so was told, where he gathered troops from the region. The Witch-king had grown overconfident, and instead of staying behind his fortifications he initiated the attack, and led his army to the plains. The Battle of Fornost was fought on the plain between the Lake Nenuial and the North Downs, where the army of Witch-king was defeated by the army of West. His army began to fall back toward Fornost, but Eärnur’s main force flanked them and struck from the north, routing the majority of the army.

The Witch-king regrouped the remnants of his army, and fled to Angmar and the safety of Carn Dûm. The cavalry, led by Eärnur himself, overtook him before he reached the mountains. Moreover, the ranks of the allies swelled, as an army of elves from Rivendell came led by the mighty hero of old, Glorfindel. Angmar was purged complitely of men and orcs, and all seemed lost for the Witch-king in the face of such numbers.

The Witch-king himself came at the last, robed and masked in black and riding a black horse; in his anger he was terrible to behold. Amongst cavalrymen he saw the Captain of Gondor, and rode toward him shrieking like a beast. Eärnur would have met the assault, but his horse shied away and fled, and it took some time before Eärnur could regain control. The Witch-king laughed, and everyone who heard it never forgot how terrible his voice was. But Glorfindel came on his white horse, and faced with such power the Witch-king fled. He vanished into the shadows, and no-one marked where he had gone."

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Drawing ink + graphite pencil work, took about 5 hours. This theme was suggested to me, and boy, it took some time to find the right part (telling about the battle of Fornost) from the book. I looked for it from the Silmarillion and from the Unfinished Tales, but after all, it was in the appendix of lotr book, which would have been easiest to check...!

Drawing horses is always darn difficult - either I mess with anatomy or size (those creatures ARE huge). Better to follow good strategy and hide it under clothing or armor, hehe.
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An illustration painted for the "Blood on the Snow" expansion book for Hillfolk by Robin D. Laws.

The game is now out for preorders, you get the PDF right now. Or you can get it at Gen Con.

www.pelgranepress.com/?p=12306
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The Erringmen (wandering people) travel the vales of Anduin with their wagons, dogs, children and herds of cattle. They're descendants of the Easterlings mixed with Northmen, so I had the pleasure of designing a rather unique look for them.

A piece made for "Heart of the Wild", a supplement book for The One Ring RPG.
"The One Ring, Middle-earth, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and the characters, items, events and places therein are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Saul Zaentz Company d/b/a Middle-earth Enterprises and are used under license by Sophisticated Games Ltd and their licensees."
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Leofrings, distant relatives to the Rohirrim charge orcish ranks in a battle.

A piece made for "Heart of the Wild", a supplement book for The One Ring RPG.
"The One Ring, Middle-earth, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and the characters, items, events and places therein are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Saul Zaentz Company d/b/a Middle-earth Enterprises and are used under license by Sophisticated Games Ltd and their licensees."
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One of a small series of illustrations I'm doing centered around the Long Winter, an event which occurred in middle earth in TA. 2758, some 260 years before the war of the ring, in which King Helm, along with his people, held out against the invading Dunlandings in the deeping valley that, centuries later, would still bear his name.

Helm Hammerhand is a great hero in Rohirric tradition, very much in the vain of ancient heroes in our world like Hercules or Beowulf; said to have stalked out alone in the snow for his foes and to have killed men with his bare hands, he is one of the "greater sires" alongside whom Theoden (prompted in part by the poisonous words of Saruman) considers himself a "lesser son." It is a running theme in tolkien's world (as it was in very nearly all of pre-modern human society) that we today are living in a diminished world, that in the past everything was bigger and grander; enemies were more dire, winters were harsher, and heroes were greater. I wanted to portray that kind of feral, old-school heroism with Helm; having him draped in rough-cut animal furs (over mail, ofcourse) with his famous horn at his side, staring out over the Deeping Wall day and night, ever vigilant, his mighty hands clenched into fists, eager for Dunnish heads to smash.

the Rohirrim (especially of this earlier time) I see as a very stoic, hard people; basically still in the "barbarian" phase of culture, prizing strength and courage over received knowledge, people who live very much in the moment. the kind of people who would love and revere a king like Helm, who at nearly seventy still sets the gold standard for not-to-be-fucked-with.

Part of the Weekly Tolkien Sketchblog

see also: Helm's Last Stand turnermohan.deviantart.com/art…
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One of a small series of illustrations I'm doing for a game centered around the Long Winter, an event which occurred in middle earth in TA. 2758, some 260 years before the war of the ring, in which the Rohirrim under King Helm Hammerhand held out against the invading Dunlandings in the deeping valley that, centuries later, would still bear his name.

I've always pictured a very celtic/britonic identity for the men of Dunland, opposite the deliberately anglo-saxon Rohirrim. It seems to fit well enough with their history; driven up into the hills, nursing their (completely legitimate) grievance against the straw-heads for stealing their land. In his fictional treatment of the celtic people and the long history of anglo/celtic conflict, Tolkien, like many english academics (especially of his day) was not above a little Anglo-snobbery, essentially dismissing the Dunlandings as backward, livestock-rustling savages (Tolkien does offer up some positive examples among the descendants of the very celtic House of Haleth, most notably the cheery men of Bree, for whom it seems being brought into the fold of Arnor and weened away from their wicked ways was a great benefit ;) ) The Dunlandings are described as wearing "tall helms" for which there are certainly no shortage of prime models in Hallstatt/La Tene culture, but I didn't want to go overboard with woad tattoos and gold torques. I thought wolf hides (or probably black sheep skins in most cases) in addition to heavy wool layers would be a good call for the winter-long siege of the Hornburg (seems a little cold to be rocking the "naked, blue-painted warrior" look) and also fits their perpetual role as marauding pack hunters (plus it just seems a natural choice of sigil for a king named "Wulf," represented here on the field by that windsock) I see them as tough men who live tough lives,  I can imagine their battles with the also very hard-living rohirrim being recounted at court in gondor, with that odd mix of contempt and admiration for the warring "barbarians" that always characterized the writing of roman chroniclers like Tacitus.

one last note, I like the idea (nowhere to be found in Tolkien's writing, but elaboration is the name of the game in fantasy gaming) that scattered in among the cohorts of Dunnish raiders you'd find some really primitive hill-folk types, like the ancient Picts; knotted dreadlocks, huge unkempt beards, rough cut animal hides, and just generally a few steps behind the other dunlandings in their social and technological development. maybe they were the original inhabitants of Dunland, distant relatives of the more advanced former inhabitants of what used to be Calenardhon, who had to come and shack up with them after being kicked out by the northmen. I think they'd probably be the first ones to start jumping to superstitious conclusions about Helm being some vengeful mountain spirit.

see also: Helm Hammerhand turnermohan.deviantart.com/art…
hel's Last Stand turnermohan.deviantart.com/art…
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The last page for The Last Days of the Third Age intro! Yaaay!
Off to render the actual video.
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