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Colorado


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Photographed Oct. 2010 on a weekend trip to the Eastern Sierras

Eastern Sierra: A Land of Contrasts, Land of Extremes


The Eastern Sierra region of California is at once little known and widely loved. Geographically separated from populated California, two main influences create a distinctly wild and scenic character.

The Sierra Nevada Range is the longest, highest and most diverse mountain range in the continental United States. A cultural condition in the Eastern Sierra exists, affectionately known as "Behind the Granite Curtain."

U.S. Highway 395 forms the backbone of Eastern Sierra travel, parallel to the ridgeline as it traverses from the cities of Southern California toward Reno, Nevada.
The beautiful and rugged backcountry of the highest elevations of the Sierra Nevada are Wilderness Areas administered by the USDA Forest Service. These include the Hoover, Ansel Adams and John Muir Wilderness Areas, and accessible on foot or by utilizing horses and/or other pack stock such as mules or llamas. Ideal opportunities exist for all types of mountaineering, backpacking, rock climbing, and fishing in the abundant lakes and streams. The world-famous John Muir trail and the Pacific Crest trail join a network of fabulous trails to all parts of this huge mountain range.
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Photographed at the Los Angeles Zoo

Listening to [link]
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A **huge** hermit crab I'd found on the shores of Bastimentos Island.
I had to chase this guy for over two hours - it just kept running away... well, not really "running" but walking slowly :) Still, I had to chase it - I'm sure that if anybody had been there, I'd look like a total nutcase!

We'll be shooting all sorts of beautiful species at my upcoming "Macro and More" Costa Rica 2012 workshop. This workshop presents the opportunity to improve your macro and nature photography skills in a stunning location with endless beauty and photo opportunities, endless wildlife and good fun, and me as your dedicated guide :)
Please click on the link for more details, and don't hesitate to contact me regarding any questions. I hope to see you there!

Bastimentos Island, Bocas del Toro, Panama
Canon 7D
Tamron 180mm macro



| Facebook | Website | 500px | Prints | 'Land of Ice' Iceland winter workshop - January 2013 |
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Most of the squirrels that people notice are the fox or eastern gray squirrels.
This is one of the Oregon Native squirrels. It's also one of the more adorable ones. Even with the eastern gray squirrels living at the zoo, these guys are still around and can be seen every so often.

Douglas Squirrel
Tamiasciurus douglasii
Portland Oregon
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Photographed at the Los Angeles Zoo
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Photographed at Piedrias Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery

Information about Piedras Blancas can be found here: [link]
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Squints is a Great Horned Owl who was found by a ranger at a local hike trail of mine. He is imprinted on humans and therefore allowed me to get incredibly close for this shot. With the help of a ranger, I was invited to take as many shots as I would like =P
"What a great opportunity it was!"

Shot with my Canon 20D and a Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 Telephoto lens and
a Circular Polarized Filter.

©2005-2010 Indigoverse Photography. All Rights Reserved.
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Picture of a wild marmot taken at Mt. Rainier National Park.
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While traveling south on California Highway 1 just south of San Simeon, I noticed something strange. One would have thought they were in Africa.
I spotted a heard of Zebra on a hillside along with the cattle that were grazing there.

I latter found out that they were part of what remains of a heard that was imported by William Randolph Hurst. The heard some say is about 75 head. On this day I counted 15 as they were frolicking on the hillside.
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