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Similar Deviations
Cuan MacDaige & Vladimir Ivanovich Aleksandrov
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Michael of Bedford and Gyrth OldCastle
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Black Kane O'Shannon and Forgal Kerstetter
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Olaf Askoldssonn and Logan Blackwoulfe [Logan Ebonwoulfe]
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This scroll is mainly based off the Hours of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (c. 1454-55). The Hours contain grisaille miniatures that fill about half of each page, underneath which the customary texts for a book of hours are written in bastarda, following a large puzzlework illuminated letter.

The miniature I chose to use for the scroll is based off of a full-page color miniature from the Hours of Mary of Burgundy (c. 1477), in which a lady is sitting at an open window looking into the interior of a gothic church. Instead of depicting the church, I used a landscape from the background of the Hours of the Cross in the Très Riches Heures of John, Duke of Berry (completed c. 1485- 90).

I used ground pigments bound with glair on vellum - my first time with all period materials! WOO.

Full doumentation is in the journal entries. ^_^

Completed in January 2011.
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Daemon Broussard and Morvran Corbet de la Flamme (Sir Corby)
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Based on Vitae virorum illustrium, by Plutarchus;
printed in Venice by Nicolaus Jenson & illuminated by Girolamo da Cremona c. 1478.

Done on bristol with watercolors.

(I later filled in the four little round frames in the illuminated letter and the one on the middle right side.... with kiwi birds and a mushroom.)

(Note the cthulhu in the top right corner)
Jan 2010
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This is about 3 by 3.75 inches wide, based on a miniature depicting the sounding of the 1st and 2nd trumpets of the apocalypse. It's found in a manuscript most likely from northern France (possibly Normandy) near the beginning of the fourteenth century. Made with gouache on pergamenata.

I've been eyeing this one for years looking for an excuse to finally paint it on a scroll, but I ended up just doing it as a way to test how long it takes me to paint something like this for a scroll. This took 7 hours and twenty minutes total (not counting numerous snack breaks). I've been attached to it because it has amazingly gorgeous colors. And fabrics. I think the angels turned out less androgynous and more '20's flapper. Oh well.

Prints and the original are up in my Etsy store!
www.etsy.com/shop/Merwenna

Completed in late 2012.
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Starting to get into mah parasol paintin' fer srs!

This one is painted with waterproof fade-resistant paint. Parasol is nylon and bamboo with wooden handle. 33-inch diameter and stands approximately 23 inches tall.

It looks *really* nice in the sunlight, and when the sun shines through it. Is (hopefully obviously) supposed to be monarch butterfly wings. I was inspired by that lovely cover of Couture with the butterfly wing dress.

Is available on my etsy shop, ditto other versions of it. :D

ETSY SHOP: [link]
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Border illumination by Lady Eleanor of Grey - I only did the illuminated 'M', the miniature at the top, the calligraphy, and the award badge.

General layout based on Narratio de gente et vita Homeri, (Verses on Homer); Florence, circa 1466.
Seen here:
[link]

This one is a service award for my scribal partner-in-crime, Isemay. We didn't get the word on the award but for a few days before the event, so I didn't have time to start one from scratch (plus, we were all doing A MILLION other scrolls at the time. Ice Castle was a very eventful event this year). Luckily, Lady Eleanor had provided the Clerk Signet (who is our scriptorium's hostess) with a bunch of lovely blanks, and the border on this one was particularly nice.

I tried to make my additions fit the white vine border, and I wanted to do a little illumination of my own, so finding the above manuscript to work off of let me play a bit. The contents of the miniature I added are actually inspired by a woodcut of Martin Luther printed in Wittenberg circa 1568. His pose looked exactly like Isemay trying to get the royals or the baronage to sign Their scrolls for court.

Issues: Making up a Greek hand was out of the question for my time limit, so I went with rotunda, which is relatively normal for a whitevine scroll. (Though I did base the first few lines of the scroll off of the cyrillic hand). Unfortunately, I suck at rotunda. I can never get it to look right. This was made even worse by the fact that either my measuring was way off, or the border was slightly crooked, or both. Thus, the calligraphy is a little askew. For a recipient who specializes in gorgeous calligraphy. Le sigh.
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