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"Hey Dad, I think I drew the wrong airplane!" was what I said when I was just about finished with this drawing. It came together at a surprisingly quick pace. But anyway I started this drawing with a set of vague three view drawings of the Italian Macchi M.5 Flying boat (the aircraft closest to the viewer.) from WWI. I wanted to research the markings this airplane had before I went anyfurther but when I began looking through a Windsock Datafile my father has on the Macchi boats I found they had many variations on the tail plane. I panicked for a bit but went further into the book and found the version I unwittingly drew and breathed a sigh of relief.
I've been wanting to get into some WWI themed stuff for awhile now and I haven't drawn any aircraft in a while so I thought this would be a good start. Of course the aircarft had to be Italian (gotta out-do the competition somehow right? ;) ) WWI in general has always been a favorite subject of mine, mostly because of my father. Even so I was looking through my gallery when I realized I only had two WWI themed drawings! This had to be remedied so I should have more WWI stuff comming here soon.
Italy I believe entered the First World War sometime in 1915 on the side of the allies. They were originally supposed to come in on the side of the Central Powers but somehow managed to avoid being dragged in and then switched sides when it looked like the allies were going to win the war. Instead, the lines settled into a stalemate on the Western Front and Italy was torn apart by war. I don't know much about what happened but it doesn't sound pretty. The Italians suffered some pretty catastrophic defeats, such as the Battle of Caporetto. From the looks of it it would seem like the Italians had some of the same problems they had in WWII, poorly led, lack of equipment, bad organization, you name it.  I'm told they had to bring out caches of black powder Vetterli rifles because of a weapons shortage and then had to use huge siege cannons for mountain warfare. Italy though, suffered from lack of good aircraft as well and had to rely on some FArench and Belgian aircraft such as the Nieport and Hanriot designs.
The Macchi M.5 was actually a copy of a Hansa-Brandensburg flying boat design. One of these boats was captured from the Austro-Hungarian Naval Air Service. Though it should be noted that the macchi did have some design ideas taken from the Nieport 11 and 17, like the "v" strut. The Macchi actaully proved to be a pretty capable fighter and was one of the few Italian home brewed aircraft able to take on Austro-Hungarian (whom the Italians mostly tangled with) aircraft. I'm kicking the idea around of backscratching one of these beauties here soon.
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A column of Chilean Infantry advancing during the Pacific war (1879-1883)


Columna de Infantería Chilena avanzando a través del desierto en la Gloriosa Jornada de 1879

XD
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What a powerful movie !! The scene with the sunrise, the music of Maurice Jarre, Omar Sharif... (I love Omar Sharif ^_- )

India ink & coloured chalk
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size A3
2B (clutch pencil) 4B & 8B pencils

portrait has been given as a present to Mr Buffon himself
commissioned by Caroline (juve fan & friend of Gigi's)
..apparently he really likes it teehee :D

Thanks Car.. glad you also liked it!!
:blowkiss:
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This is an illistration i made for a friend in the military. I've always been a fan of Hohlwein's style in posters, and his influence is in this work.

- Watercolors and ink -

Una ilustración que hice para un amigo en el ejército. Siempre he sido fan del estilo de Hohlwein, asi que su influencia se nota en este trabajo.

- Acuarelas y tinta -
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Констатин Хабенский (for every non-Russian speakers Konstatin Habensky :lol:) as Admiral Kolchak from the Russian film Admiral (2008). I'm a very big fan of him since I saw the films Night Watch and Day Watch (he played the role of Anton Gorodetsky).
So first I wanted to draw him as Anton. The only reason I finally drew him as Admiral Kolchak is that I love uniforms. :psychotic:
I used a B grade pencil (and rubber of course :P).


Thank you for favs and comments! :hug:


Please support me on Facebook! :meow: BlackLeadArt
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Better quality scanning of this (as opposed to electronic petty larceny):

vasskholzovf.deviantart.com#/a…

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Of interest: Notes on how the bayonet was used by British Forces in the First World War:

vasskholzovf.deviantart.com/ar…
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The 'I-should-be-learning-Spanish' picture.

No mud. I might go back and scrawl mud all over them later.

So, here we have some Queen's Men - men of 1st Battalion, the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment attempting to rush an enemy position. The men are led by a young subaltern, who looks back to encourage his men. The Private soldiers wear 'Fighting Order' 1908 Pattern webbing, with ammo pouches, water bottles, D-shaped mess tins, entrenching tool and to their left, a bayonet frog and scabbard. Each man carries a Mk III* Short Magazine Lee Enfield rifle, with 1907 Pattern bayonet fitted. These vicious pieces of steel were 17 or so inches long, and turned the rifle into something of a half-pike. The SMLE was an exceptional battle rifle, with its bolt allowing for very rapid firing, and its magazine being able to house 10 rounds, against the 5 rounds of other rifles. Although the sights were not ideal, being more of a battle sight than target-shooting sight, the men of the BEF in 1914 proved that they could be accurate repeatedly in excess of 1,000 or more yards with it. Each ammo pouch could hold 50 rounds of ammunition, and on top of this, men often wore (for offensive actions) two bandoliers of another 150 rounds - AND carried more ammo in their packs. On top of this, they carried spare equipment, clothing, iron rations - and other pieces of non-standard kit deemed necessary for battle. Barbed wire coils, grenades ("Bombs"), pickaxes and more. Aside from this, the men wear Field Service Dress uniform, type D boots and puttees, and a Mk I steel helmet. Known as the Brody, but more often joke names like tin-hat, lid or battle-bowler were used. All men carry a Small Box Respirator in the 'ready' position on their chest.

The officer wears officer pattern Service Dress, with a Sam Browne belt, Webley .455 revolver holster, binos, and ammunition. What you can't see is his map case, a haversack satchel and possibly a pack on his back too. His puttees - usually Fox's, have a bit longer and therefore are wrapped around his legs more times than the private soldiers'. Just noticed - his revolver lacks the lanyard it would have had, and I haven't given him a trench whistle. I shall revisit this.

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As I've mentioned in other ww1 pieces, the BEF had by 1918 come a very long way and was arguably the most advanced and efficient army of all the main western combatant armies. Douglas Haig, among many good things he did, gave a huge amount of precedence to the unglamorous side of war - logistics. He also was a major advocate of a the doctrine of Decentralised Command (which most armies adopted later), allowing the local commander more autonomy. In February 1917, the operational research unit, that Haig had been a key member in establishing, published pamphlet SS 143, essentially the British anser to the much-vaunted German Stormtrooper manual. It made the Platoon the key fighting unit, gave it more flexibility and autonomy, and allowed it to become a very potent weapon. Although the concept of Getting up and trudging / running toward machine guns seems rather blackadder-esque, it could have its merits, and where fire and manoeuver failed and men were getting pinned down, forcing resolution of the combat by rushing the enemy could often be a useful tactic. As well as that, rushing a position before they had recovered from the shock of a 'hurricane' bombardment [artillery falling very heavily but briefly, surprising the enemy] or mine having just been detonated allowed them to get a foothold before the enemy recovered.

Bayonets are a rather old-fashioned weapon, and it is often said that ww1 was a war of artillery, and that bayonets overall caused something like 2% of all casualties. There is no doubting the potency of artillery in the great war, but one must remember, that bayonet wounds would markedly increase during an offensive, but that while an offensive went on, the majority of the rest of the front would remain quiet, and therefore artillery would kill proportionally more. As well as this, arty fell behind the lines and was therefore it was easier to statistically quantify artillery wounds, because they were behind the lines. During a battle, it's a lot harder to deem who died of what in all the confusion, and rightly so, assessing how many men were killed by what was of a very low priority during fighting. It is likely therefore that bay'nets inflicted more than 2% of casualties although naturally, artillery still ruled the roost.

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Drawn in decent paper with, for some reason, a 3H pencil. Re-uploaded in better quality.

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T.E. Lawrence, oil/canvas.
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This painting will be part of a collective exhibition in tribute to the Cuban poet Jose Marti on his birthday January 28.

Here is some of his poetry:

I Have a White Rose to Tend (Verse XXXIX)

I have a white rose to tend
In July as in January;
I give it to the true friend
Who offers his frank hand to me.
And for the cruel one whose blows
Break the heart by which I live,
Thistle nor thorn do I give:
For him, too, I have a white rose.

Esta pintura va a ser parte de una exposición colectiva en homenaje al poeta Cubano José Martí en su natalicio 28 de enero.

Aquí algo de su poesía:

CULTIVO UNA ROSA BLANCA... (Verso XXXIX)

Cultivo una rosa blanca,
En julio como en enero,
Para el amigo sincero
Que me da su mano franca.
Y para el cruel que me arranca
El corazón con que vivo,
Cardo ni oruga cultivo:
Cultivo la rosa blanca.

Acrylic on wood

Gerardo Gomez
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The Battle of Poltava is the infamous battle between Sweeden and Russia in 1709. It was the most memorable moment of the Great Northern War.
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