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Similar Deviations
"Hey Dad, I think I drew the wrong airplane!" was what I said when I was just about finished with this drawing. It came together at a surprisingly quick pace. But anyway I started this drawing with a set of vague three view drawings of the Italian Macchi M.5 Flying boat (the aircraft closest to the viewer.) from WWI. I wanted to research the markings this airplane had before I went anyfurther but when I began looking through a Windsock Datafile my father has on the Macchi boats I found they had many variations on the tail plane. I panicked for a bit but went further into the book and found the version I unwittingly drew and breathed a sigh of relief.
I've been wanting to get into some WWI themed stuff for awhile now and I haven't drawn any aircraft in a while so I thought this would be a good start. Of course the aircarft had to be Italian (gotta out-do the competition somehow right? ;) ) WWI in general has always been a favorite subject of mine, mostly because of my father. Even so I was looking through my gallery when I realized I only had two WWI themed drawings! This had to be remedied so I should have more WWI stuff comming here soon.
Italy I believe entered the First World War sometime in 1915 on the side of the allies. They were originally supposed to come in on the side of the Central Powers but somehow managed to avoid being dragged in and then switched sides when it looked like Britain, France and Russia were going to win the war. Instead, the lines settled into a stalemate on the Western Front and Italy was torn apart by war. I don't know much about what happened, but in Italy but it doesn't sound pretty. The Italians suffered some pretty catastrophic defeats, such as the Battle of Caporetto. From the looks of it it would seem like the Italians had some of the same problems they had in WWII, poorly led, lack of equipment, but organization, you name it.  I'm told theyb had to bring out caches of black powder Vetterli rifles because of a weapons shortage and then had to use huge seige cannons for mountain warfare. Italy though, suffered from lack of good aircraft as well and had to rely on some frecnh and Belgian designs such as the Nueport and Hanriot.
The Macchi M.5 was actually a copy of a Hansa-Brandensburg flying boat design. One of these boats was captured from the Austro-Hungarian Naval Air Service. The macchi though did have some design ideas taken from the Neuports 11 and 17, like the "v" strut. The Macchi actaully proved to be a pretty capable fighter and was one of the few Italian home brewed aircraft able to take on Austro Hungarian (whom the Italians most;y tangled with) aircraft. I'm kicking the idea around of scrachtbulding one of these beuaties here soon.
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Acrylic on wood
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What a powerful movie !! The scene with the sunrise, the music of Maurice Jarre, Omar Sharif... (I love Omar Sharif ^_- )

India ink & coloured chalk
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This is an illistration i made for a friend in the military. I've always been a fan of Hohlwein's style in posters, and his influence is in this work.

- Watercolors and ink -

Una ilustración que hice para un amigo en el ejército. Siempre he sido fan del estilo de Hohlwein, asi que su influencia se nota en este trabajo.

- Acuarelas y tinta -
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Констатин Хабенский (for every non-Russian speakers Konstatin Habensky :lol:) as Admiral Kolchak from the Russian film Admiral (2008). I'm a very big fan of him since I saw the films Night Watch and Day Watch (he played the role of Anton Gorodetsky).
So first I wanted to draw him as Anton. The only reason I finally drew him as Admiral Kolchak is that I love uniforms. :psychotic:
I used a B grade pencil (and rubber of course :P).


Thank you for favs and comments! :hug:


Please support me on Facebook! :meow: BlackLeadArt
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T.E. Lawrence, oil/canvas.
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oil on wood 99 cm x 76 cm

Dogfighting emerged in World War I. The Wright brothers invented the first manned “heavier than air” aircraft to achieve flight in 1903, and immediately, people began to think of how to apply the new technology to war. Aircraft were initially used as mobile observation vehicles and early pilots gave little thought to aerial combat. Balloons had been used for this purpose since the Siege of Paris, by the Prussians, in 1871.[5] The new airplanes proved their worth by spotting the hidden German advance on Paris in the second month of the war.[6]

Enemy pilots at first simply exchanged waves, or shook their fists at each other. Due to weight restrictions, only small weapons could be carried on board. Intrepid pilots decided to interfere with enemy reconnaissance by improvised means, including throwing bricks, grenades and sometimes rope, which they hoped would entangle the enemy plane's propeller. This progressed to pilots firing hand-held guns at enemy planes, such as pistols and carbines. In August 1914, Staff-Captain Pyotr Nesterov, from Russia, became the first pilot to ram his plane into an enemy spotter aircraft. In October 1914, the first airplane to be shot down by a hand gun from another plane happened over Rheims, France. Once machine guns were mounted to the plane, either on a flexible mounting or higher on the wings of early biplanes, the era of air combat began.

The biggest problem was mounting a machine gun onto an aircraft so that it could be fired forward, through the propeller, and aimed by pointing the nose of the aircraft directly at the enemy. Roland Garros solved this problem by mounting steel deflector wedges to the propeller of a Morane Saulnier monoplane. He achieved three kills, but was shot down behind enemy lines, and captured before he could destroy his plane by burning it. The wreckage was brought to Anthony Fokker, a Dutch designer who built aircraft for the Germans. Fokker decided that the wedges were much too risky, and improved the design by connecting the trigger of an MG 08 Maxim machine gun to the timing of the engine.[5][7] The Germans acquired an early air superiority due to the invention of the synchronization gear in 1915, transforming air combat with the Fokker E.I, the first synchronized, forward firing fighter plane.[5][7] On the evening of July 1, 1915, the very first aerial engagement by a fighter plane armed with a synchronized, forward-firing machine gun occurred just to the east of Luneville, France. The German Fokker E.I was flown by Lieutenant Kurt Wintgens, earning the victory over a French two-seat observation monoplane. Later that same month, on July 25, 1915, British Royal Flying Corps (RFC) Major Lanoe Hawker, flying a very early production Bristol Scout C., attacked three separate aircraft during a single sortie, shooting down two with a non-synchronizable Lewis gun which was mounted next to his cockpit at an outwards angle to avoid hitting the propeller. He forced the third one down, and was awarded the Victoria Cross.[5]

Battles in the air increased as the technological advantage swung from the British to the Germans, then back again. The Feldflieger Abteilung observation units of the German air service, in 1914-15, consisted of six two-seat observation aircraft each, with each unit assigned to a particular German Army headquarters location. They had but a single Fokker Eindecker aircraft assigned to each "FFA" unit for general defensive duties, so pilots such as Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke began as lone hunters with each "FFA" unit, shooting unarmed spotter planes and enemy aircraft out of the sky.[7] During the first part of the war, there was no established tactical doctrine for air-to-air combat. Oswald Boelcke was the first to analyze the tactics of aerial warfare, resulting in a set of rules known as the Dicta Boelcke. Many of Boelcke's concepts, conceived in 1916, are still applicable today, including use of sun and altitude, surprise attack, and turning to meet a threat.

British Brigadier General Hugh Trenchard ordered that all reconnaissance aircraft had to be supported by at least three fighters, creating the first use of tactical formations in the air. The Germans responded by forming Jastas, large squadrons of fighters solely dedicated to destroying enemy aircraft, under the supervision of Boelcke. Pilots who shot down five or more fighters became known as aces. One of the most famous dogfights, resulting in the death of Major Hawker, is described by the Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen,

I WAS extremely proud when, one fine day, I was informed that the airman whom I had brought down on the twenty- third of November, 1916, was the English [version of] Immelmann.... First we circled twenty times to the left, and then thirty times to the right. Each tried to get behind and above the other. Soon I discovered that I was not meeting a beginner. He had not the slightest intention of breaking off the fight. He was traveling in a machine which turned beautifully. However, my own was better at rising than his, and I succeeded at last in getting above and beyond my English waltzing partner.... The impertinent fellow was full of cheek and when we had got down to about 3,000 feet he merrily waved to me as if he would say, "Well, how do you do?" The circles which we made around one another were so narrow that their diameter was probably no more than 250 or 300 feet. I had time to take a good look at my opponent.... When he had come down to about three hundred feet he tried to escape by flying in a zig-zag course during which, as is well known, it is difficult for an observer to shoot. That was my most favorable moment. I followed him at an altitude of from two hundred and fifty feet to one hundred and fifty feet, firing all the time. The Englishman could not help falling. But the jamming of my gun nearly robbed me of my success. My opponent fell, shot through the head, one hundred and fifty feet behind our line.[8]

By the end of the war, the underpowered machines from just ten years prior had been transformed into fairly powerful, swift, and heavily armed fighter planes, and the basic tactics for dogfighting had been laid down
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Portrait of President Lincoln. Created using Gouache on Strathmore paper. I filmed the drawing and painting of this piece. You can view the time lapse video here: [link]
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size A3
2B (clutch pencil) 4B & 8B pencils

portrait has been given as a present to Mr Buffon himself
commissioned by Caroline (juve fan & friend of Gigi's)
..apparently he really likes it teehee :D

Thanks Car.. glad you also liked it!!
:blowkiss:
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This painting will be part of a collective exhibition in tribute to the Cuban poet Jose Marti on his birthday January 28.

Here is some of his poetry:

I Have a White Rose to Tend (Verse XXXIX)

I have a white rose to tend
In July as in January;
I give it to the true friend
Who offers his frank hand to me.
And for the cruel one whose blows
Break the heart by which I live,
Thistle nor thorn do I give:
For him, too, I have a white rose.

Esta pintura va a ser parte de una exposición colectiva en homenaje al poeta Cubano José Martí en su natalicio 28 de enero.

Aquí algo de su poesía:

CULTIVO UNA ROSA BLANCA... (Verso XXXIX)

Cultivo una rosa blanca,
En julio como en enero,
Para el amigo sincero
Que me da su mano franca.
Y para el cruel que me arranca
El corazón con que vivo,
Cardo ni oruga cultivo:
Cultivo la rosa blanca.

Acrylic on wood

Gerardo Gomez
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