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Similar Deviations
Octopus head for a cane or walking stick, 4.5" tall

available here:

[link]
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OK Almost there with Painting this Cyberhead. Now need to add more contrasts for the tiny parts to stand out.

The Body part is cast and primed. More pics to come
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Photography: Sylwia Makris [link]
Headpiece: Dana Mikelson (partner) :icond-mikelson:
Model: Sarah Rachel Wigg.
Make up artist: Tina Brawisch
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Tea-dyed coutil corset with dupioni binding, lace embellishment, and a tiny bit of embroidery. Two-layer construction with pale purple flossing that's barely visible.

I used 32 steel bones: 24 1/4" spiral steels, 4 1/2" spiral steels, two normal 1/4" flat steels and two of those extra-heavy flat steels that corsetmaking.com sells as 1/4" but are actually 3/8".
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Now, something for myself again. I made this one out of a fancy. Something like "oh, I need a new corset. - But why? You got enough! - Cause I can." (Imagine a boyfriend for the middle part)

Now, this is made from my stash of really small silk pieces I can't suffer to throw away. And from the similar stash of velvet pieces. In detail: blue silk, wehite and gold silk brocade, blue velvet. I added some blue lace, some gold lace, some gold appliques, a bit of ribbon and of course some tiny beads and a bit of sequin.

The whole thing is lined with black cotton and bound with black satin (I had to finish in time). It has only plastic boning inside but will work fine even without a real corset underneath.
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My TARDIS dress, which I wore to KumoriCon 2011 this last Labor Day weekend. The convention was amazing and so much fun; definitely the best anime convention I've ever been to. The attendees were so much more well behaved this year, the staffers and volunteers were great, and the hotel staff was AMAZING! They were to excited to see the cospalyers! It was awesome!

The TARDIS dress is a first mockup, and I'm already planning on redoing it, with the same pattern, and in different styles. Already have a Lolita TARDIS dress in the works for next year's Kumo. And I also got a commission for this dress from a fellow Whovian who co-ran the Who panel at Con. So excited! :D
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Here is my finished Hobbit Bodice!

I hope one day to get a decent wig since curling my own hair is a pain, plus I'd like shorter hair around the front and perhaps a bit blonder than my natural color. I had my heart set on a cream chemise, moss skirt and rust-colored bodice. I chose the fabric because it wasn't too rich of a brocade, but resembled the fabric used in Merry's waistcoat, so I thought it appropriate. It's trimmed with velvet ribbon and the buttons have dragons on them. I hand-bound the button holes. The ears I ordered from WETA.

This is now wearable, but I will probably add a cloak for the December Hobbit premiere, and when I learn the skills, I plan to hand-tie a wig and hand-make proper hobbit feet.

Please download full size to see dragon button and fabric details :) Not to be used as stock. Please also note, this is NOT COSPLAY. This is a COSTUME, so please don't call it a 'cosplay'. Thank you for understanding.
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Celtic tunic, with heavy La tene style embroidery

This tunic and others are for sale in my etsy shop [link]

My Blog [link]

My FB Page [link]
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A commission for one of the guys in the Royal Guard at the Renaissance Festival I'm working at.

Ignore the dress underneath, it's for a guy. :P

No pattern used, custom design. Will upload shots of him in it!
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This gown, known as cote­hardie, kir­tle, cotte, cote, or gothic fit­ted gown, is based on early 15th cen­tury Euro­pean sources. This style came into popularity in the 14th century and continued on into the 15th. The dress is made of linen. The but­tons are all hand­made and the button holes hand sewn. The bot­tom hem fea­tures a con­trast­ing fab­ric that matches the pin-on sleeves, all done with coun­ter­change but­tons. Here, I am wearing it with a frilled veil and a vel­vet belt.

More photos here: [link]
My main fashion site: [link]
You can also find me on Facebook: [link]
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