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HERE IS THE VIDEO:
[link]

This deviation is the finished piece and a video of it's production.
I put it in tutorials because I thought someone might be able to learn from my style :D
The video image is a little squashed, but you get the idea.

I hope you enjoy watching it, it took me a while to encode! Yay!

Please comment etc :)
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Yeah I sound funny huh? Yup my voice has an accent when recorded. I sound like a British person from the South. XD
Anywho enjoy the Tutorial and ask questions below and I'll try to answer them.

Tutorial is here: [link]

Don't forget to subscribe to my Youtube channel or watch me on DeviantArt for more Tutorial updates. And I do take requests!
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At times like this I'm so very happy with my embroidery machine :D The markings turned out really clean and crisp.


Anyway, i've been getting a lot of questions about my way of embroidering markings directly onto faux fur or other textured fabric, you can do this two ways;
One; Embroider on the fabric before you cut the parts of your plush out,
Or two; Embroider on parts that are already cut. (this saves you a few inches of precious fabric going to waste but it is a little tricker. This method is explained below). Ammy's body markings make a good example c: 



HOW TO:

1. First of all, it's important to use a regular stabilizer material for support from below to keep your fabric in place and prevent bunching (the needle uses quite a bit of force to stitch the pattern on sothat could cause shifting.) Seeing as I already had most of the body sewn for this plush, I used a self-sticking Tear-away stabilizer that is meant to be used for fabrics or parts that are too small be strung into the embroidery hoop.

2. Remove the top layer of the Tear-away stabilizer and place the desired fabric or part that needs to be embroidered ontop the sticky side of the material. Make sure the area you will be embroidering is perfectly flat with no bumps or folds visible. If necessary , use an iron.

3. Cut a square of 'Covering film' large enough to string up for your embroidery hoop. There are films available that are specially meant to be used for furry or textured fabrics. The one I use is kind of very thin stretchy plastic. If you don't use any kind of covering material you will have hairs peeking out from between the stitches and that's not something you'd want, right?

4. Cover your project with the film and press the areas that don't cover the fabric against the adhesive side of your bottom stabilizer to keep the film in place.

5. String up your whole project into your embroidery hoop, tightly. Make sure the covering film lies against the fabric as tightly and flat as possible with no creases visible. You might want to practice or redo this a few times. (stringing up your fabric properly is really really important! Any shifting can ruin your project.) Because I practically had half a plush lying under my film I used some pins to tighten it. XD 

6. After that comes probably the hardest part when you use this method. Pin-pointing out where the embroidery needs to be stitched. If you're not as daring, you might want to draw some helping lines on the film before you start embroidering. 

7. Start your machine and let the magic happen. c:

8. When you're done, remove your fabric from the hoop and carefully tear the adhesive stabilizer off of the back of your fabric. Now all that's left is your covering film. Remove the plastic film by carefully tearing it away from around your embroidery. Because of its thinness and flexibility it should release pretty easily. And there you go! All done. c:
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I recommend you to full view!

This tutorial is about base colouring and selection, or at least how I do it. I hope it helps, it's rather beginner but hey. I'm sure those starting out in photoshop would like to know.

Any questions feel free to ask me. I'd like to do some more basic tutorials before I step into anything bigger but I do not know when I'll be getting around to it next.

This tutorial will require some basic knowledge about layers and photoshop, so hopefully it's not too much to handle.

:3

Oh, and coloUring is spelled like this because I am Canadian.
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Finally uploaded it!! , here ya go , LAYERS

peace

kalen

you can watch the live stream video of this here

[link]
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Video tutorial [link]

Enjoy :D
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It`s very good and interesting practice for me.

Fruits is here:

Also, you can check another useful materials:



Good luck! And have a nice day! :)
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The Making of a Shadow Dragon

1.  Concept Sketch - I am admittedly not much of a sketch artist.  But I really like to do quick concept sketches like this to figure out poses and base arrangements.  This helps me and helps my client see what my plans are.  I normally only do this for more complex pieces or cake toppers.  This client wanted me to use Todd Lockwood's rendering of the Shadow Dragon from Forgotten Realms for inspiration.

2.  Initial Pose and Blocking - This was done directly off my concept sketch.  The base was made with Super Sculpey.  I like to use this clay for broad shapes as it is softer and easily formed.  My usual 50/50 mix of Super Sculpey/Sculpey Firm was used for the dragon; this helps hold detail better. 

3.  Pose Adjustment and Refining - Since it is supposed to appear as though the dragon is ascending through a tunnel, I modified the pose to make it look more like he is ducking to avoid the shallow ceiling.  This is also where I begin to define the anatomy and face.

4. Medium-Large Details - Once the anatomy is in place, I can start laying in larger scales as well as facial details and claws.

5. Fine Details and Finishing - All those tiny scales are sculpted individually.  It's very time consuming to make it look natural.  Some are pieces of clay pressed onto the sculpture, others were tooled in.  I use rubbing alcohol over the scales to soften the edges and then go back and carve some of the detail back in so they don't look uniform.

6. Painting, Membranes, and Metallic Effects - The sculpture is baked and painted with acrylics.  I then use a special paper called Glassine for the membranes of the wings and crests.  Finally, I finish off the piece with metallic powders by Pearl Ex.  This gives a striking sheen to the sculpture.  A spray finish is then necessary to lock the powder into place.

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Want to learn to sculpt like I do?

Check out my new book, Creature Sculpt!

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Check me out on : Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | Etsy | emilySculpts.com
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How i draw Knight =) sorry but find only that file

Concept art [link]

Low poly 3D model [link]
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