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Warhammer related art, this is one of a few pieces made to convince Games-Workshop to employ my artistic services.

Lets hope it works.

about 8 hours in CS5
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More Environments, this time an ancient UFO base with some Mayans going to see their Gods as the land.

CS4
2 Hours
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This alternate-history map shows the extent of the Empire of Lithuania, around the 18th-19th century.

The timeline changed during the 14th-15th century, with Grand Duke Vytautas achieving victory in the Battle of the Vorskla River, and expanding further into far Ruthenia. As a result, Vytautas continues working on his plans, eventually breaking the Union of Krėva and becoming King of Lithuania.

Over time, the Kingdom of Lithuania expands further and further east through its southern territories, taking over weakened Khanate territories before Russia could, and thus ends up reaching the Pacific Ocean, dominating over northern Asia.

Now, centuries later, the Empire of Lithuania is a great world power. Its primary language is Lithuanian, although various provinces in the west are mostly autonomous and thus use the their own languages ( like, for example, White Ruthenia/Belarus use the Ruthenian language ).

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Before anyone decides to point this out, know that I am aware that this map is somewhat implausible. I am also aware that the imperial province/territory names are barely, if at all, readable - it was intentional, since I don't know any alternative far-eastern Russian territory names.

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This was made using GIMP v2. I used the MEIOU ( it's an excellent Europa Universalis III mod ) world map as a basemap for the territory and geography shapes.

The fonts used aren't made by me - I found them on DaFont.

Download for full view ( 2550x750 )
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Heres another portfolio piece, a final illustration of a redesigned Raphael. I always figured since he was basically the tortured soul of the bunch, he'd be a loner and most likely to be boozing a alot.

I wanted to add more stuff to him but at the same time didn;t want him to seem weighed down with stuff, So I kept his pack simple.


be sure to check out my other TMNT re-designed of Rocksteady----> [link]
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Pencil sketch
PS cs5
Chicken Fingers and honey
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Here is my revision of George Orwell's 1984, where three superstates: Oceania, Eurasia, and Eastasia have divided the post-apocalyptic world after a Third World War, resulting from a Nazi victory in WW II. I admired Orwell because I feel that fascism, communism, and feudalism should be wiped out not by violence, but by free thought and equality. And to see people hate civilization and use the book as an excuse to divide up the world is indeed sick and twisted, just like how the three police-states were born. Here are the countries in my personal opinion.

Oceania
Government: Oligarchical-Feudalist State (cause everything is miserable and bombed out)
Capital: Possibly New Orleans, New York, or Toronto
Territories: Americas, Australia, New Zealand, British Isles, Antarctica
Ideology: INGSOC, Feudalism, Socialism, Celtic Nationalism (Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Briton)
Anthem: [link]

Eurasia
Government: Neo-Bolshevik state (de jure)
Fascist-military dictatorship (de facto)
Capital: Berlin
Territories: USSR, Europe (except British Isles), Middle East, and Africa
Ideology: Nazism, German Aryanism, Fascism, expansionism, Anti-Celtism, Anti-Zionism, Anti-Semitism
Anthem: [link]

Eastasia
Government: Communist Government (much like north Korea and Communist China)
Capital: Shanghai
Territories: India, Afghanistan, East Asia, Japan, and most of the Pacific
Ideology: Communism, Death worship, Pan-Asianism, Imperialism, Chinese-Nationalism
Anthem:[link]
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Cyborg assassin from the Lawless universe.
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An allohistorical map of North America, with an emphasis on Canada.

The idea for this map was inspired heavily by Dathi THorfinnsson's UltraCanada timeline on alternatehistory.com, with a point of divergence during the French Revolution.

* * *

November 1793: The Vendéens were actually met by British reinforcement, as expected, after more successful communications during the Siege of Granville and are able to take the town for a while. However, seeing that they cannot hold it indefinitely, the Vendéen forces along with their families and many Granville townsfolk fearing Republican retribution, are evacuated to England.

The evacuation sets a precedent in further operations, and more people associated with the counterrevolution (royalists, clergy, etc.) are taken in by the English who are committed to supporting the Royalists. They are also willing to pick up non-combatants, often whole families, especially as a condition for men to join the Royalist/British cause. However, instead of remaining in England, these people are encouraged to go to Canada, specifically Québec, where they largely take up farming and other activities.

Once the Treaty of Amiens established peace between the United Kingdom and the French Republic, the demobilization of former Vendée forces brought them largely to Canada, rather than staying in England or returning to a republican France. A portion of French royalists also began to find refuge in Canada once peace was established.

* * *

In this scenario, Canada experiences higher rates of immigration from France early on in its history, proving to be formative in the development of a stronger Canadian polity. By 2010, the North American continent has seen the maturing of two great powers who have often been at odds, but more often than not have relied on each other as two close brothers do. A quick (and very general) sketch of the three states presented in this map:

The United States of America, born of revolution against the British Empire, would realize the results of its antagonism against a more populated British colony to its north, culminating in the loss of the War of 1812 as well as the loss of New England. However, the eventual results of the war do not prove to present any obstacles for the young nation's ability to grow and even expand westward. Yet, the failure of the Americans to achieve parity, much less victory, in this war and in much future political and economic jostling on the continent marks the American national psyche in the decades which follow. On a present-day map, one can point out the often curious consequences of nativist or anti-British movements which have occasionally and briefly influenced American politics and society. Here, the United States has nonetheless emerged in a similar, if somewhat more muted, fashion to the one we know: a global superpower whose cultural, political, and economic might has reached far across the globe, yet which faces growing domestic ailments and increasing competition for power on the global stage. The nation gazes steadfastly towards Canada, watching the continued flourishing of its northern counterpart.

New England, having been notably less enthusiastic about war against the British for commercial reasons, declared independence from a disgruntled United States in the aftermath of the War of 1812 for reasons of self-preservation. Being able to maintain autonomy by way of formal relations with the British and strong, extensive economic ties with a number of partners (the United States included), the New Englanders have been able to maintain a marked and consequential presence on the continent despite being overshadowed by its larger neighbours. Indeed, Boston has often been able to act as a mediator between the interests of Windsor and Washington. In the present day, relations with the US have long since normalized, and the New England economy is deeply intertwined with those of the US and Canada.

Canada is, due to heavier immigration from France, decidedly more French in character. But more importantly, Canada is a lot more populous in its early history as a colony. This, broadly speaking, is a central factor in the British/Canadian victory of 1812, which would place what would become Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Champlain firmly in Canadian control and leading to the strengthening of Canadian self-assuredness, marking a watershed moment in the formation of Canadian national identity. The Canadian dominion would see its territory expand westward and northward after Confederation and, with the help of British efforts, would come to encompass a larger portion of the Oregon country, Alaska, and Greenland. While doing far better in a number of different arenas than the Canada we are familiar with, it still is fated to become the secondary power on the North American continent. This Canada is a lot more ambitious, however, taking the existence of its southern neighbour to be a challenge answered by the massive potential the nation holds. The geopolitics resulting from Canadian influence, assertiveness, and identity-making in the context of American leadership and dominance on an international scale has resulted in a long history of dynamic and interesting relations between the two countries, with the two always somewhere on a scale from warm embrace to vigorous strangling, but always somehow holding on to each other. With the outlook looking uncertain for what has thus far been called "the American Age", Canada sees itself in a position to establish itself further as an emerging world power and to embed itself at the centre of global relevance.

* * *

For a first cartographic project, I'd like to think that I've done fairly well for myself. I feel like I've generally approximated the clean look of an online atlas, and I'm quite proud of having drawn or traced every single thing by hand/from scratch. My familiarity of the continent's coastlines has definitely increased! That being said, there are number of things I'm unsatisfied with—lakes, typographic details, the absence of a scale bar, the absence of major cities... and my rendering of a narrative for the actual (allo)historical path towards the final state of things being one of the biggest ones—but I've decided to stop before it takes up too much of my time... Perhaps, I might rework this in the future or create another map focusing solely on Canada. In any case, the first of hopefully many projects.

* * *

04/24/14: Changed a few place names and added Canadian cities. Bolded city names indicate populations of 1 million or more.

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Acrylic paint on a 16" X 20" hard canvas board. Painted by Mark Barnett in August 2011.
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The Kingdom of American States had a tumultuous early history. Having won their independence from Britain in the dying years of the 18th century the thirteen colonies joined in a loose coalition of states. Unfortunately their coalition was flawed; the states fought constantly, both in the political arenas of federal government and, occasionally, on the battlefield. Their overlapping claims to territory, disputes over slavery and the disagreement about how the federal government should be organised caused constant friction.

This enmity existed between the states themselves as well as between the state governments and the federal government in Philadelphia - it was rare for Virginia to listen to the decisions made by the Continental Congress less than 250 kilometres away, and the rest of the states wavered between obedience and outright defiance.

It was decided something must be done. Either the United States remained strong together, or divided and became weak. In Europe Kings and nobility laughed at the Americans - "Their 'Republican Experiment' has failed!" they cried, "No common, elected man could rule a country!". In America, many people agreed.

An absolute monarchy was out of the question, so America must have a monarch tempered by elected bodies and meritocratic institutions. But even after the Americans had decided on the constitution, who would be King?

Virginia and its southern allies championed George Washington - their hero of the revolutionary war! The northern states disagree - Virginia had too much power as it was without their statesmen sitting on the throne! Again the nation was split, until one man stepped forward.

Christian Friedrich Karl Alexander of the German noble house of Hohenzollern was not an unknown to the American people. In the last few years of the revolution Prussia had thrown in its lot with America, hoping to damage the powerful Britain and, with a little luck, gain a new ally. Their contribution to the war was small, but significant. A handful of men under the command of a low-ranking nobleman, Christian Friedrich.

Though late on the scene, Christian Friedrich's contribution to the war was disproportionately large. He took command of a small force of volunteers and was fundamental to the American victory in the Florida campaign. He wasn't the greatest hero of the war, but he wasn't from any state in particular and was liked by statesmen across the nation. He spoke English and French with no real accent from his native German, and his Spanish was passable - though he could have only spoken Chinese for all the Spanish-speaking Floridians cared.

The states were in agreement. They had a central government strong enough to decisively solve disputes between the states; they had a modern, centralised military to protect the nation; and they had a King.

The hardships were not over for the Americans, though. In the mid 1840s, as Europe was wracked by revolutions calling for more reasonable government and greater democracy, so too did the people of America call for action.

In the north many stood with the King - known as the Imperialists they favoured a strong, federal government headed by a powerful monarch. They believed in the American state and the power of a nation over the rights of the people. In the south there were the plantation owners and those who were pro-slavery - many called for the preservation of states' rights, some even believed it.

At first it looked like the states were to be locked in a political stalemate. Then the people called for some else, a sentiment much more powerful than thinly-veiled support for slavery. They called for a republic.

It wasn't just the south that rose, but the west too. The Oregon territory was home to some of America's greatest republican thinkers, and their people rose up in support of their ideals of reasonable government and freedom from tyranny.

The fighting was brutal and bloody. Brother fought brother, fathers fought their sons. Thousands died to move the line a mere inch, and fields and cities were burnt down and laid bare. Both sides took their share of the casualties until, one by one, everything the south had going for it started to fall apart.

Mexico, which had covertly supplied the revolutionaries with funding and arms, had to withdraw its support in the face of domestic rebels. Britain, who had remained staunchly neutral, threw its weighty opinion behind the Imperialists - it did little to help the war in the field, but it did much to sway opinion. The people of East Florida, who had not joined the revolution but had it imposed upon them, rose up against the republicans. In the West the republican armies were destroyed by Maj. Gen. Thomas Williamson's Army of Montana, and the Army of Virginia under Maj. Gen. Josias "Buffalo" Krieger routed the republican forces and captured Richmond. It took less than a year for the Imperialist forces to push their way down the Mississippi and force the republicans to surrender.

Britain's official backing of the imperialists during the war was a surprise. America had revolted from under British rule and they had remained rivals throughout America's history. Cynics claimed that the British merely supported the Imperialists in order to get in their good books, hoping for something in return once the war was over. Others claimed the British merely wanted to prevent the republicans from winning, fearing a similar revolution in Britain itself. Both of these reasons are true, but there were other factors that contributed towards Britain's decision. Many British politicians were staunchly abolitionist and had been appalled that the Kingdom of American States had not outlawed slavery entirely - seeing that one side of the war supported slavery, they supported the other. In addition to this more pragmatic British politicians observed America's local dominance of North America and saw that they could not hope to regain control of the region. Seeing the American States' as the "natural leader of North America" they hoped they could exert more influence over the world, as well as expand their trade empire, if America were their friend and ally.

In the latter half of the 19th century Britain truly came into its own as a world power. The dominance of the British empire over the globe was so effective and absolute that contemporary historians came to refer to the era as "the Glorious Peace" and the diplomatic system that allowed for this peace as "the Glorious Regime". In effect Britain had, through their advantages in trade and cunning diplomacy, created a system whereby they ruled the world through trade and could use concessions and sanctions as sticks and carrots to get the rest of the world to do what they want.

Britain was also willing to sacrifice their interest in favour of their allies in hopes of engendering an unwavering loyalty to the system. Portugal was promised line of territory running from the east coast of Africa in the Congo to the west coast in Mocambique and the Netherlands had Sri Lanka, Austronesia and various trade outposts handed over for a reasonable sum. In order to cement America's place in the Glorious Regime Britain made an offer of much of British North America, excluding the more populated east. America accepted and gave up a tidy sum in return for the confirmation of their position as the natural great power of the Americas. Following this purchase the Americans sought to broadcast to the rest of the world that they had come into their own, that they were a great power not to be messed with, and they did this with a simple name change. The Kingdom of American States had become an Empire.


In bringing America into the Regime Britain also paved the way for the Cape Verde purchase, whereby Portugal sold the Cape Verde islands to America as an outlying naval base in return for a decent sum and trade concessions, helping to bolster their dying economy and give the Portuguese King much needed support when republican revolutionaries looked to overthrow the outdated monarchy.

When Haiti revolted and called for annexation to the EAS Britain co-ordinated a diplomatic effort with Prussia to have France back down and concede the colony to the Empire. And when the Spanish-American War broke out Britain threw its support behind America, harassing Spanish shipping in Europe and imposing a blockade that allowed America to overrun its American and Pacific colonies unimpeded.

Now it is 1900 and America enters the 20th century as a great power united with Britain in an alliance that rules the world. But, as always, the struggle is never truly over.

***

This took a couple of weeks to make and finish, and it took me another week or two to get around to writing the description and actually posting it. Sorry it's so late, but I hope you enjoy it!

The title comes from a quote from Stephen Decatur ([link]):

"Our country! In her intercourse with foreign nations, may she always be in the right; but our country, right or wrong!"
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Following the ratification of the United Earth Constitution the various states, provinces, etc of the Earth were mandated to redraw their borders to comply with the minimum population requirements necessary for statehood, effectively dissolving most of the Earth's historic regions and eliminating what remained of national boundaries. In North America this happened surprisingly quickly, as many former US States promptly established themselves as some of the first States within the United Earth. Many speculate this is largely due to the internal divisions within most North American regions.
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