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Beast Vision Vol. 04

Mon Apr 28, 2014, 9:48 PM
BeastVision is all about showcasing inspirational digital art to the community!

:icondonmalo:

VALLEY by donmalo

:iconkuldarleement:

Brofist from god by KuldarLeement

:iconbayardwu:

Waisong Never End2 by bayardwu

If you have any suggestions for artists/work to feature please feel free to send a note to the group.


Textures by subtle patterns.
Skin created with SimplySilent's CSS Generator
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55-img-00 by techgnotic











In Bangkok, Thailand, students are being arrested for raising their hands in the air to flash Katniss’ three–finger “freedom” salute.


That’s right, the Katniss who’s the fictional heroine of the popular dystopian sci–fi “Hunger Games” movie series. The world has changed over the last few decades in a very big way, but some are apparently unaware of it or undisturbed by the stunning ramifications.




Advanced surveillance technology is endangering not only personal privacy, but also any possibility of political organizing being kept secret from government power. So even the most democratic nations are now faced with Big Brother seeing, hearing, and knowing everything. Drones and other military tech advances have meant a reconceptualization of warfare making resistance by those who have taken stands against their governments or ruling forces a difficult undertaking. Potential political leaders can be snuffed by drone strikes before anyone knows their names. Governments snooping on text messages can stop demonstrations before they happen. Still, the need to protest remains, leading us to ask—what form is left to us?


We still have the movies.


Putting on a Guy Fawkes mask or raising the “Katniss salute” are now actual political statements.


What many see as the planet’s politically leaderless void is now being filled by our movie hero champions. Fictional movie characters are delivering those heartfelt speeches about freedom and love of humanity that move us and inspire us, while the words of our actual political leaders, for many, continue to evoke only vague hopes of a better tomorrow. There may be a breath of hope in this—but the sword of movie propaganda cuts both ways. Movies are entertainments produced by corporations for profit. “Politically correct” messages are usually imparted only accidentally. The politics of “Katniss” will be determined at the box office by what her fans are willing to hear. Let’s hope her fans demand the studio not attempt to “soften” of her character so she can remain the female “Spartacus”—a Roman slave who lead an infamous revolt and a very cool movie.


The words of movie heroes are now igniting real passion in the hearts of people in Thailand, moving them to take a symbolic action: raising three fingers into the air. If this goes against government wishes and leads to arrests being made then these protesters will go to jail for referencing a fictional story from a movie.


In China, the premiere of Mockingjay, Part 1 has been delayed. A movie about a rebellion to overthrow a fictional oppressive government is quashed by a government perhaps fearful of the example Katniss and her comrades might put into the heads of audiences in China. But in a familiar pattern of banning content, China potentially makes the movie (which millions will see anyway on illegal downloads) all that more powerful as a symbolic torch for freedom.


Popular culture seems to have created a worldwide narrative of “freedom,” though it’s still as vague and hazy as the fictional sources it’s being extracted from to find its final shape. At the end of the day Katniss is a fictional character living in a fabricated world conceived of by her creator Suzanne Collins.


She is not taking real action, not facing consequences for marching in the streets, she may be the spark that lights the kindling—but the kindling has to be there to light. The heart of revolution lies in the people. Fictional characters don’t create social change, people do.
















Your Thoughts






  1. Have you seen the Katniss three finger salute used by people at your work, at your school or in the streets? Do you have a clear sense of its meaning?

  2. What fictional story, character or role has inspired you to political action in your own community?

  3. As an artist, have you used symbolic images to substitute for grand ideas such as freedom or social equality on the one hand or repression and fundamentalism on the other?










That’s right, the Katniss who’s the fictional heroine of the popular dystopian sci–fi “Hunger Games” movie series. The world has changed over the last few decades in a very big way, but some are apparently unaware of it or undisturbed by the stunning ramifications.


For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
Want to submit any ideas, suggestions, collections, or an existing work for consideration for the Today page? We'd love to look at it. Email us at share@deviantart.com
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Norman Rockwell, All American Deviant

Tue Oct 28, 2014, 7:51 PM
Norman Rockwell Tribute by Sarafinconcepts














Few artists have so definitively reflected the lives of average Americans as Norman Rockwell.


He began his lifetime dedication to being the “America’s Illustrator” as the 19-year-old art editor for Boys’ Life, the house publication of the Boy Scouts of America. A few years later he assumed his more famous position at The Saturday Evening Post, though he never broke his ties with the Boy Scouts. His first great achievement painting everyday scenes of America in his signature hyper-realistic style was “The Four Freedoms,” a series inspired by a speech by the U.S. President, Franklin Roosevelt, in 1943 during World War II. Two of the four paintings, “Freedom from Want,” depicting a family Thanksgiving dinner scene, and “Freedom of Speech,” with an average Joe voicing his opinion at a Town Hall meeting, have become all-American visual icons in the decades since their creation.







Freedom from Want
by Norman Rockwell







Freedom of Speech
by Norman Rockwell







Freedom from Fear
by Norman Rockwell







Freedom of Worship
by Norman Rockwell




Rockwell was a true American patriot, lending his talents when needed as a propagandist of war during World War II, but also painting pleas for peace and reconciliation when inner strife tore at the nation’s fabric in the 1950s and 1960s. He painted his version of the WWII female icon, Rosie the Riveter, for the Post, and not to be confused with the “We Can Do It” J. Howard Miller government commissioned poster gal. Rockwell’s “Rosie” cradled her riveting gun in her lap as she had her sandwich for lunch, the heel of her shoe resting on a copy of Hitler’s “Mein Kampf.”



When the threat from without was quashed and racial division boiled over as the threat from within, Rockwell, the visual “spokesman” for the majority of average Americans, painted “The Problem We All Live With” (1964). It depicts six-year-old African-American Ruby Bridges on her way to an all-white public school in New Orleans on November 14, 1960. School desegregation brought threats of violence against the child’s admission, so she was escorted by four deputy U.S. marshals. The wall behind her is vandalized with the n-word and the letters "KKK". A smashed tomato thrown at the little girl drips on the sidewalk. Rockwell obviously felt it was his duty to tell hard truths when needed about his beloved America, and he did it as forthrightly and effectively as he did when evoking the joy of a family gathered for Thanksgiving. He truly defined for all time “American artist.”



















Your Thoughts


  1. What is your favorite Norman Rockwell painting?













Few artists have so definitively reflected the lives of average Americans as Norman Rockwell.


For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
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You and I | Art Feature

Fri Apr 18, 2014, 12:35 PM


Others' voices by agnes-cecile

Suggested Soundtrack: "You and I" by One Direction | Artwork by agnes-cecile 



I figured it out from black and white.

lines hold the memories by agnes-cecile
Seconds and hours.
just one hour - memory III by agnes-cecile
Maybe they had to take some time.

two different lights by agnes-cecile
I know how it goes from wrong and right.
Silence and sound.

Others' voices by agnes-cecile

Did they ever hold each other tight
Like us?
intimacy on display by agnes-cecile

Did they ever fight
Like us?

our lines, our story, it isn't a linear path by agnes-cecile

We can make it 'til the end.
Nothing can come between
our great love story by agnes-cecile
Not even the Gods above
Can separate the two of us.

I don't want you to forgive me by agnes-cecile
I figured it out.
Saw the mistakes of up and down.

within the bounds of this single road by agnes-cecile
Meet in the middle.
There's always room for common ground.

wakeful by agnes-cecile
I see what it's like for day and night.
Never together

this thing called art is really dangerous by agnes-cecile

'Cause they see things in a different light
Like us.
But they never tried
Like us.

Forever yours, Freckles - detail - by agnes-cecile

We don't wanna be like them.
We can make it 'til the end.
Nothing can come between
You and I.

intimacy on display by agnes-cecile
No, nothing can come between
You and I.

xx love by agnes-cecile
Suggested Soundtrack: "You and I" by One Direction



Skin by Dan Leveille
Suggested Soundtrack: "You and I" 
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Animals Within, Spirit Animals

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 5:34 PM
71-img-00 by techgnotic













There has always been this obsession with the others we share this planet with.


We communicate with them on certain basic levels and yet they inhabit a plane so different from ours: savage, instinctive, a life of sheer survival. At the same time they can do things beyond human abilities: fly through the skies, swim the oceans, apply the physical strength of a dozen strong men. They survive and thrive where we would perish. Yet animals cannot tell tales of their experiences. When we speak of an animal, even our beloved pets and friends, we can only imagine their emotions, thoughts, and inner lives.


Is it then any surprise that from cave paintings to cereal mascots—animals and art are inseparable?



From the beginning of recorded time, animals have been immortalized in pottery, statues, been worshipped as gods, and had fables and myths created in their image. Seventeen thousand years ago, in a cave shielded from the sun, a Cro–Magnon artist raised her bundle of split reeds, dipped them into charred black soot, and began illustrating an opus of animal life: stags, cats, bears, birds. Five thousand years ago, Egyptians integrated animal features into creation myths, and used them as hieroglyphs, adapting the recognizable forms of vultures, bulls, cobras and lions (among others) into a communication system.


Today, in every culture across the globe, animals serve as mascots for sports teams and cereals. We have Tony the Tiger and Toucan Sam. Anthropomorphized animals star in movies and comics. My Little Pony has amassed groups of Bronies. Animal cosplay is mainstreaming into mass culture. It all still begins with a child given that first crayon who immediately begins to sketch the familiar forms of cat and dog.


Animals are intrinsic to creativity and art—but why are they so satisfying to observe, mimic, and draw? What is the power they maintain over us to the extent that so many feel an actual spiritual connection with a particular species of their own extended family—cats, dogs, wolves, dolphins, raptors? While so many feel this connection, artists seem particularly sensitive to the presence of their animal spirit kindred and guides.












Why are artists so drawn to animals?


Visually, animals are beautiful and compelling subjects.


Animals are an efficient subject. Identifying characteristics can be drawn and recognized easily— cat eyes, elephant tails, butterfly wings, bunny ears: all unique visual traits. Powerful physical capabilities lend themselves to artistic expressions of motion. The long fluid moves of a deer, expressively captured with a few expert lines. Quick brushstrokes sketch a hyperactive monkey. Heavy pen lines suggest the static power of a stoic elephant. Physical similarities help artists develop a quick visual shorthand for a specific species—but unlike humans, animals that look alike often behave similarly. While anyone who’s ever lived with a pet knows animals have individual personalities, it’s not over–simplifying to state that each type of animal has its own range of specific behaviors and attitudes. It’s this species–by–species predictability that draw individuals to become fond of a particular animal. Just as an artist may prefer certain subjects or materials, so do artists become fascinated with the idiosyncrasies of a species.



Emotionally, animals express primal urges and desires.


Animal personalities are predictable. Tigers are fierce, squirrels are nervous, sharks are stealthy, hippos are lazy. Compared to the complexity of human behavior, animals are simpler beings. They behave according to instinct, not reason. As such, they serve artists well as ciphers for emotion. It’s not just art that allows us to connect spiritually with animals. It’s easy to observe, in ourselves and others, subconscious similarities between personal behaviors and the characteristics of a favorite animal. We’ll call a clever person a fox, or a stubborn child a donkey. A sweet guy is a puppy dog. A sexy lady is a minx. An angry, stubborn man is a bull. Animals serve as elements of our visual and written language.


Humans explore our own instincts through animal art.


Using animals in art, we recognize the most beautiful and terrifying parts of ourselves—our instincts. Society and language are important for humans, but when we feel urges or emotions beyond what is widely accepted or understood, both of these creations fail us.


When we talk about “spirit animals,” it can be in a magical sense, the idea that an essence we can’t see is guiding us through our lives. Or it can be an affinity for a species we find our instincts connecting with. Perhaps we have a fondness for the way they move, finding them fun to draw. Maybe we can imagine the world through their eyes, running, flying or swimming at top speed. But perhaps we see something more than the animal. We see ourselves.


Animals provide a bridge between the alien and familiar, allowing humans to recognize ourselves in strange forms. We can represent our fears and our desires expressed without reserve. Through animal eyes, we can acknowledge the oddness and the fallibility of humanity. Featuring animals in art, we can interpret many spiritual aspects: the primal and the innocent, the beautiful and mysterious. As long as we share a planet, artists will look to our Earth companions for inspiration and understanding of ourselves.






Community Thoughts



I personally have been drawn to animals my whole life and my earliest pictures were always of wildlife. I think artists see the world through different eyes than most and the things that fascinate us speak to us on a deeper level. Animals are an enigma, they have intelligence and their own means of communication and yet we can only hope to understand and be a part of their world. If you've seen my gallery you know I clearly have a fondness for big cats, I find everything about them to be beautiful and awe inspiring. My art is a way for me to get close to these animals in the only way possible, I’ll never be a zoo keeper (because I know myself and I wouldn’t be able to respect the boundaries they do and I’d get eaten—that’s a fact) and I’ll never own one because it goes against everything in their nature to held in captivity as a pet. It can be a very intimate experience to draw an animal in detail and it makes me feel close to them and privileged to show a side of them that others may not see. Any great animal art in my opinion has to come from a deep love and respect for the subject first and foremost by the artist, and what follows is their tribute.”


:iconheatherzart: Heatherzart






I think people gravitate toward depicting animals in art because they are simply aesthetically stunning to look at. Humans are very visual beings and we have always enjoyed striking colors, beautiful patterns, flowing lines and powerful forms. All animals have something which can be appreciated. Like for example dramatic plumage, or the intricate silver and black patchwork that is the coat of a snow leopard. To capture that on canvas is something many artists find alluring.”


:iconailah: ailah












Your Thoughts




  1. What animal do you find yourself drawn to in your art? What about this subject is so ennobling that you would seek to emulate?
  2. What personal qualities do you possess that drive you to feel a shared connection with a particular animal?
  3. Do you have vivid dreams in which you become, or run with, your “spirit animal”?
  4. Over time, how has your understanding of this animal evolved? Has your perception of the creature changed?
  5. What are some challenges you’ve experienced in terms of drawing animals, and how have you solved them?
  6. How does drawing an animal compare to drawing a human?
  7. Who are your favorite animal-focused artists in the DeviantArt community?










We share the planet with them and communicate with them on certain basic levels. Yet they inhabit a plane so different from ours: savage, instinctive, a life of sheer survival. At the same time they can do things beyond human abilities: fly through the skies, swim the oceans, apply the physical strength of a dozen strong men. They survive and thrive where we would perish. Yet animals cannot tell tales of their experiences. When we speak of an animal, even our beloved pets and friends, we can only imagine their emotions, thoughts, and inner lives.


For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
Want to submit any ideas, suggestions, collections, or an existing work for consideration for the Today page? We'd love to look at it. Email us at share@deviantart.com
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103-img-og by techgnotic














January 19 marks the birthday of Paul Cezanne in 1839.


By the time of his death in 1906, he was recognized, especially by younger artists, as the genius who began his career under the tutelage of impressionist Camille Pissarro, and then went on to become the “architect” who reduced the subjects of his paintings to cylinders, spheres and cones before then building upon their geometry, careful stroke by careful, laborious stroke.  This “deconstruction” of subjects into their basic forms laid the basis for “cubism,” pioneered by Picasso and others, which then spawned a multitude of art movements. Cezanne was responsible for the revolutionary ideas about the essence and perception of art that inspired all that soon followed in modern art.  Picasso declared Cezanne “the father of us all,” and “my one and only master!







It would sometimes take hours for Cezanne to commit a single brushstroke to his work in progress, because he wanted each stroke to contain “the air, the light, the object, the composition, the character, the outline and the style” of the subject he was painting.  He believed in “seeing and sensing” subjects he was painting rather than “thinking” about them.  He sought to unify sight with touch, allowing no cognitive distraction to block the path between what his eyes were perceiving and his fingers were recording.  His mission was to capture a moment in time in his art  -- a moment that was about to cease to exist and never return again.







Art is a personal apperception, which I embody in sensations and which I ask the understanding to organize into a painting.”


— Cezanne








Unlike most other important figures in modern art who were forced to live most of their lives one step ahead of abject poverty and starvation, Cézanne was fathered by the co-founder of a banking firm and enjoyed a life of financial security, including a large inheritance.  Rather than poverty, it would be poor health that would be the bane of his existence, beginning with the onset of diabetes at the age of 51.  His father’s death and his chronic ill health are thought to have been what so negatively impacted and wrecked the all too briefly idyllic period in his life that came with the bourgeoning respect he was finally receiving for his art and his ideas.  His long friendship with author Emile Zola soured and ended and he wrote his wife out of his will, leaving everything to his son.  In the autumn of 1906, he was caught in an unexpected rainstorm in an open field where he was painting.  For two hours he continued to work despite the deluge.  Walking home, he collapsed and was rescued by a passing driver.  The next day, he tried to work, but fainted and was put into bed.  He died a few days later from pneumonia.  He was 67.






Cezanne, though well-known as an “important” painter, is not the creator of any single “fan favorite” paintings, in the manner of art history’s other great movers and shakers.  His importance came as being the architect who constructed the bridge from impressionism to modern art abstracts by inventing (though he was unaware of it at the time) “cubism.” He sought to see the “solid” forms in impressionism that could be built upon to create more accurate perceptions of moments of ever-elapsing and lost forever time. He was important as the visionary capable of mapping modern art’s course out of impressionism and onward to diverse new schools of artistic perception and expression.












Your Thoughts




  1. Can you name a Paul Cezanne painting without consulting Wikipedia?
  2. When you are enjoying a particular work of art, do you become interested in the artists who influenced the creation of that art, or do you leave that to the academics?
  3. Do you enjoy reading about or hearing lectures about great artist’s theories of the essence of art and how they perceive their missions as artists creating beautiful and inspiring moments for people through creating and displaying their art?  Or do you prefer just “looking” and having your own thoughts, free of the influence of having heard the artist’s ideas and theories?











January 19 marks the birthday of Paul Cezanne in 1839. By the time of his death in 1906, he was recognized, especially by younger artists, as the genius who began his career under the tutelage of impressionist Camille Pissarro, and then went on to become the “architect” who reduced the subjects of his paintings to cylinders, spheres and cones before then building upon their geometry, careful stroke by careful, laborious stroke. This “deconstruction” of subjects into their basic forms laid the basis for “cubism,” pioneered by Picasso and others, which then spawned a multitude of art movements. Cezanne was responsible for the revolutionary ideas about the essence and perception of art that inspired all that soon followed in modern art. Picasso declared Cezanne “the father of us all,” and “my one and only master!


For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
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Untitled-1 by techgnotic



















His Books of Blood in the 1980s established him as a premier master of the horror narrative, on an equal level or even surpassing Stephen King, who said of him;











I have seen the future of horror, his name is Clive Barker.


Stephen King










Like King, Barker’s works of horror have been adopted and adapted for movies, his stories becoming the basis for the Hellraiser and Candyman series and many more. Beyond his stories being used as source material, Barker has worked as screenwriter, producer, actor and director in the film world.


As with Stephen King, many of Clive’s fans have found him through enjoying his horror tales used as source material for films. (Sadly, such is the decline of the “reader” in the internet world.) His “Pinhead” character, a collector of souls, emerged from the pages of The Hellbound Heart to become the iconic focal nemesis of the Hellraiser movie series. His face full of nails has almost become thought of as Clive Barker’s alter ego. Clive has had a love-hate relationship with the movies. He directed the original Hellraiser and his “butchered in studio re-editing” Nightbreed has been recently re-released on Blu-Ray. He had his best luck with Lord of Illusions and Candyman.









Pinhead
























Clive’s writing has taken several directions since being born in the most hardcore horror narratives. In 2002,the first of his self-illustrated Books of Abarat series received the Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers.









Babilonium





It was also chosen by the American Library Association as one of its “Best Books for Young Adults.” Inspired by ideas coming to him in dreams, Clive’s 825-page magnum opus Imajica explores the themes of God, sex, love, gender and death through the prism of Barker’s “dark fantasy.” His more recent writings have turned more toward contemplative fantasy than his earlier exercises in relentless horror.




It’s instructive that only his success in powerhouse horror stories eventually gave Clive the creative space to explore the many spiritual and existential themes that his more recent works have continued to develop. His expert blurring of the mental retaining walls separating  the concept of Heaven and Hell, or his recombinant conception of pleasure and pain principles, suffuse his “dark fantasy” works with a societal subversiveness far more profound than the shocks of his “straight horror” earlier works. His early tales can be read for fun. His later work requires some contemplation of the evanescent nature of personal reality.













Never content to rest on his laurels, Clive is also an accomplished visual artist, and has long been a gallery-quality painter in the fine arts world, illustrating more and more of his own books.









Marapozsa Street





As an ‘artist first’ creative, all of Clive’s works, no matter the medium, begin with a painting. His artwork has been exhibited at Bert Green Fine Art in Chicago, at the Bess Cutler Gallery in New York and can regularly be seen at the Century Guild gallery in Los Angeles.


DeviantART is currently running multiple challenges for deviants to turn the table and write a horror or fantasy short story or poem to tell the tale behind any of the several Clive Barker original paintings he has provided from his private collection.




He has, as well, submitted both an unpublished short story and a poem to his gallery that we are spotlighting. Clive’s writings are like nothing that ever came before them. As you study his paintings, you will find that his visual imagination expressed in his brazen brushstrokes is just as unique and forceful as the audacious voice of his literary inventions.











Christopher Carrion










Gan Nug










Deetha Maas



















The really exciting news is that Clive Barker’s Books Of Blood, not having been published in 25 years, have been released today as Madefire Motion Books here on DeviantArt. Don’t take our word for it, take a look at the gorgeous preview below of the first installment, Books of Blood adapted into motion by writer Mark Alan Miller (Next Testament, Hellraiser) and artist mister-sam, The Books of Blood pushes the limits of the motion comic platform and the boundaries of terror. The motion book was produced by Clive’s nephew, Gareth Barker.



























Paintings and Drawings, Volume One

Clive's art can not only be seen on his DeviantArt page, but also in two gorgeous new books of his art. The first can be purchased from the Century Guild website.


While the most recent, which has already surpassed its Kickstarter goal, has only a few days left in its campaign.








25 Years Later: The Director’s Cut

You had to be there. Watching Clive Barker talk about the restoration of his fantastical vision, the audience sighed as he brushed tears aside to thank everyone who helped complete his picture. The film took on a whole new life as the monsters assumed their true role as the heroes of the tale. Executive Producer Mark Miller led a tireless campaign to find and restore the forgotten footage and quite rightly shared Clive’s standing ovation as the curtains closed.


The newly completed restoration is now available on Blu-Ray.
























1



How did publishers first react to the submission of a “Young Adult” book by Clive Barker? How difficult was it to get The Thief of Always and Abarat published?









I had the greatest difficulty, actually, with all of those books. There is a great reluctance amongst publishers to give successful genre writers the freedom to travel somewhere a little distance from the genre where they’ve been most successful.













The Thief of Always (1992)










I had to beg, steal and borrow; and say please, please, please.”









But eventually I actually sold The Thief of Always, which I had written already, for a dollar to Harper Collins in England. This is a somewhat reduced sum of money by comparison with my usual advances for a book. But, it was the only way I could get them to publish the thing.









Commexo Kid







I said to them, “Alright, you publish this for a dollar and I understand that you’re going to do your best by this book but I also understand that you don’t have much expectation, but I also understand that you purchased it for a dollar and you’re risking very little. But I have faith that if you give it the chance to perform in the marketplace it will do very well for you.”


They put it out there and they packaged it very well. There were some reviews that said “Alright, why is Barker doing this?” But then there were a lot of reviews that were very friendly toward it. And the book ended up very successful. Not immediately, mind you, but it gathered momentum. I think there is a certain sense that I’m not a horror author, and I’m not.





I’m an Imaginer, as I’ve said many times before.”





There are certain books in my oeuvre that preceded The Thief of Always, books like Weaveworld for instance, which are fantasy books. They’re not horror books. I thought, in some ways, Thief of Always fell into the same style as Weaveworld.











Candy Dressed for Abarat (Triptych)










Abarat (2002)





Abarat was a thornier problem, because I had told Harper Collins a long time ago that I wanted to write something that was in the same style as the Narnia books. To add to that idea, I had started to paint oil paintings to illustrate the books, and in fact that’s where the books were coming from narrative-wise. They were originating in my paintings, which is an odd thing for anyone to do, but it sort of worked for me, because it was a way for me to surprise myself.



There are are now many hundreds of oil paintings for Abarat, and not all of them by any matter of means will be published within the five books of Abarat. But, because I have Century Guild looking after my work and representing my work and publishing my work in various forms, I think the world will be able to see everything that I’m painting.









2



You executive produced Gods and Monsters, the marvelous film about James Whale's last years. How much of an affinity do you feel with Whale?









Interesting question, this. The initial conversation with Ian McKellen, to have him play James Whale, happened in the room I’m sitting in right now. He didn’t want to play the role. He felt that it was a somewhat melancholy depiction of what homosexuals were like, and he felt that as an out homosexual who had been very political in his recent life, he didn’t feel like he wanted to engage in a somewhat melancholy vision. But, I sat with him here and we compared notes on some things. One of the things was how much our lives were similar to each others’ lives, and how similar our lives were to James Whale’s life. We, all three of us, are northern English lads. We were all born within probably 70 miles of one another. We’re all homosexuals, obviously. We all had difficulties with the world around us in many ways, and yet at the same time found power and strength in our homosexuality.





And we found strength in using the ways that the universe says no to us as a way to say yes to art.”










Self Portrait





So, the conversations that Ian and I had here, comparing notes, was what got Ian to say yes to the movie and, finally, got me to feel closer to James Whale.













untitled







3



How do people react when they find out you are also a “fine art” level painter whose artworks are as notoriously audacious as your literary works?









This is a hard one to answer. I do this stuff without really thinking about it too much. People often don’t know that I paint. Recently, though, with Thomas Negovan of Century Guild having taken hold of my work in a major way, and put out the first volume of the Imaginer book, people have begun to understand what I’m doing a lot more. Thomas has become my great apologist and has really made people understand what I’m doing in a way that I never could. I’m really not that great at talking about my own art.





I’m not particularly good at talking about anything I do, generally. Because I do it with my gut, not with my head.”





I’ve had situations, with both Mark Miller and Ben Meares, in my writing room where I’ve started a conversation and I’ve started with an idea and within 5 or 10 minutes we have an entire script planned out. That’s happened to us a lot. A lot. That’s how I work, really. Ben and Mark have the closest vision, the closest understanding, of what it’s like to be in my head, because they watch me go through that creative process of linking one thought to another, and that to another, and watching it grow exponentially in front of us.


And I do it essentially without having that solid a grasp of what I’m doing, I’m just doing it. So, really, I can’t talk too much about that because while I know when people react to the art, they react pleasurably, but I don’t think I’m very good at being able to explain what I’m doing to them. I can leave Thomas to do that.












untitled










Untitled










The Itch









4



How are your satisfactions as a writer and as a painter different? And how are they the same? How do you know in the morning whether you must express yourself on the keyboard or the canvas?









Of course they’re different. Utterly different. For one thing, a painting can be finished in a night; a book takes a year, or at very least 6 months to complete. Writing is fucking hard, and very seldom is it pleasurable. Now...









I destroy a lot of paintings. A lot of paintings. But then, I also destroy a lot of text.”









I’m a very self-critical son of a bitch. I work fast, I think, and that allows me to throw out a lot of things. If I don't let things go, they sort of constipate the whole process and then I can’t move forward, so it really is important to me to not get overly besotted with one particular idea, but to instead simply move on to another one and let that happen.









Untitled







Right now, I’m working on the last two Abarat books and a couple of other things for young audiences. I’ve been working on a lot of paintings.





I’ve done over 400 paintings in the last 6 months. It’s a race now, really.”





I’m a 62 year old man, and I have a lot to do. I’ve been very sick the last few years. I had a period of being in a coma, and that left me sick for a long time afterwards, and I’m only now just coming out of that sickness.


So now, I’ve got a lot of stories to tell and a lot of people to love and a lot of dogs to raise and parrots to adore and all that good stuff. I have life to live, in other words, and that’s important. But, the satisfactions of writing and painting are very, very different. They are not really, in any way, the same. I suppose you could say, “Well, they’re the same because there’s a blank piece of paper or a blank canvas at the beginning and at the end there’s a finished thing.” But, that’s honestly the only similarity. A finished painting is not anything like a finished novel in any way shape or form. How do I know in the morning whether I must express myself on the word processor or the canvas? Well, first of all, it’s a handwritten process so there’s no word processor at all. But, I usually do both in a day. It isn’t ‘either or.’













Mater Motley









5



How much of a help has it been in having a fan base in online worldwide communities like DeviantArt? Has the support been genuinely palpable and benefiting to your good spirits?





It’s been wonderful! To have the deviantART folks help me touch base with people all over the world, it’s been very affirming. The support has been genuinely palpable and absolutely benefiting to my good spirits. There have been dark times of late and I’ve been so grateful to have people from all over the world who are able to tell me what they like and don’t like.








6



Is there anyone special project you’re currently working on, or planning, or dreaming about doing, that might eventually become a future reality for your fans to look forward to?





Yes, there is. And I ain’t going to tell anyone what it is. It’s one of the things I’ve learned over time: don’t tell anybody what your sweetest and dearest dreams are creatively, because that’s the way to kill them stone dead. So, yes, I have a couple of things that are very close to my heart, and that’s where they will stay, until such time that they are published or painted.












Untitled








Untitled










7



Poe, Lovecraft, Barker, King. How do you feel being added to the to that exalted honor guard of horror masters?








I can’t answer that. I want to be reasonably humble here.”







I do my thing, they do their thing. It doesn’t sit well with me to elevate myself in that way. It’s hubris, and it’s totally inviting someone to kick the legs out from under you. So, rather than say, yes, I am in the same ranks as Mr. King and Mr. Poe.




I’ll say this: I do my thing. I imagine, and sometimes I do good stuff and sometimes I do shit stuff and I’ll continue to do it. Whether I belong with them or not is up to someone in the future to judge, not me.









8



Finally we’d like to ask you to select your top five Deviant Artists from the community.







It's an impossible thing you ask. How can a man choose his favorite artists from such a wellspring of creativity. I can only offer 5 names that have recently inspired me:


















  1. Does it please or disappoint you when an artist with Clive Barker’s imagination and superlative talents of expression chooses to explore the darker side of human existence?



  2. Once a writer (or artist in any media) establishes him- or herself in a specific genre (e.g., “Clive Barker: Master of Horror”) do you feel betrayed or intrigued when that artist tacks to a new course (“Clive Barker: Fantasist Imagineer;” “Clive Barker: Young Adults Author”)? Do you welcome or resent joining the artist in this evolution?



  3. Do you think any of the cinematic treatments of Clive’s fiction (e.g., Candyman, Hellraiser” have succeeded in capturing the essence of his original (written) medium? Or are movies and books apples and oranges that defy comparison; each having unique attributes deficient in the other; and each having deficiencies easily resolved in the other.



  4. Would you like Clive to occasionally revisit his full-tilt horror writing in the future, or are you well-satisfied with his current works of his ever-expanding consciousness, like Imajica? (Are you hoping The Scarlet Gospels will be a return to hardcore Barker horror?)



  5. Who are your favorite writers and artists on DeviantArt who explore a darker tone in their works?



  6. What is your favorite Clive Barker book or film and why?









“I have seen the future of horror, his name is Clive Barker.”

Writers: techgnotic 
Designers: marioluevanos


For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
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Untitled-2 by techgnotic



















Star Wars Actor Loses Millennium Falcon Privileges


Harrison Ford crash-landed a small, vintage aircraft on a Los Angeles golf course yesterday, making it his third crash/emergency landing as a pilot. We are happy that Mr. Ford is in stable condition, and that no one else was hurt, but we’re also stuck wondering, who keeps letting this guy fly? Just kidding, get better Harrison!







Watch Forever


A community love project started with this journal. Who will absolutely stay on your watch list forever? Share your treasured deviants in a showcase journal of your own.














Unfinished Business
by iStockphoto LP


Getty Images and Fox Release Hilariously Dumb Stock Photos


The photos depict Vince Vaughn, Dave Franco, and other members of the cast of the upcoming film Unfinished Business. The photos are free to download and use (non-commercially)!








Nobody Does Cosplay Like the DeviantArt Community


DA member and cosplayer Ophidia (ketoh), photographed by Alexandra (aKami777), sets the standard for Dragon Age cosplay. These shots look so good, they might just convince someone out there to make a live-action Dragon Age show or movie.










The Lonely Whale Gets an Entourage


Adrian Granier, of HBO’s Entourage, will be responding to your questions in the comments section of our Whale Article today. The whole world is tuned in—except for one of us.








Welcome Wagon Group


New to DeviantArt and confused about where to start? Head over to DAWelcomeWagon. This group of friendly and helpful deviants will turn you into a super deviant in no time! Feeling helpful? Join the group and get involved!







Birthdays


Say happy birthday to some Deviants who make great work today! Peter is a fiction writer, and Mike is a painter and photographer.









Valentine Heart Contest Winners Announced


The winners of our Valentine Heart Contest have been posted! Go check them out and show some love, then give yourself a well-deserved congratulations for surviving another Valentine’s Day.








Toy Story 4 to be a romance and not following trilogy


Pixar has put the childhood memories of 90s children everywhere in its crosshairs this week with the announcement that the forthcoming Toy Story sequel will be a standalone film that does not relate to the original trilogy. Pixar’s president described the film as a “romantic comedy.” We await more news with baited breath.








Wil Wheaton to Voice Abraham Lincoln


Here’s our last, very Deviant interaction with Wil Wheaton!









Your Korrasami Ship Has Come In


The co-creator of Legend of Korra, Bryan Konietzko, is selling a new art piece which depicts Korra and her girlfriend Assami relaxing in one another’s arms. Proceeds from the piece will go to support LGBTQ suicide prevention. The image also confirms that Korra and Asami’s relationship is canon.







78-Year-Old’s Dying Wish to See a Rembrandt Granted


This touching moment was made possible by a Dutch charity called Stichting Ambulance Wens (Last Wish Foundation). Do you have an art bucket list? What’s on it?








Jared Leto Debuts His Joker Haircut for Suicide Squad


The actor has gone clean-shaven and blonde for his role as The Joker. Based on the image, we think he might have gotten lost and ended up at Hogwarts. He’s definitely getting Slytherin.








Along For The ScreamRide


We are still obsessed with ScreamRide. Here is a video to inspire you.










All The Feels


How often do you forget where you put your keys? We can all relate to doggyguts’s plight, and unfortunately, it does not get better. The struggle is real.
























Today's Headlines From The News Desk - 03-06-2015

Author: eawood 
Curator: Moonbeam13 

For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
Want to submit any ideas, suggestions, collections, or an existing work for consideration for the Today page? We'd love to look at it. Email us at share@deviantart.com.
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Anastasios Gionis is a digital sculptor and 3D modeler for the film industry. His work has been featured in films such as Snow White and the Huntsman, Cabin in the Woods, Land of the Lost, Hop, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor.

He also did character design for kids TV shows including As Told by GingerAll Grown UpSquirrel Boy, and Rocket Power.

Demon Soldier by Mavros-Thanatos
Bedside by Mavros-Thanatos
Figure In Doorway by Mavros-Thanatos

coneFace by Mavros-Thanatos      Hanging by Mavros-Thanatos

Room by Mavros-Thanatos
Dragonbat by Mavros-Thanatos
Demon Hound by Mavros-Thanatos
Demon Elite by Mavros-Thanatos

Crowned Alien by Mavros-Thanatos    Mohawk by Mavros-Thanatos    Painted Eyes by Mavros-Thanatos

The Cryer by Mavros-Thanatos
Tentacle Mouth by Mavros-Thanatos
Birdman by Mavros-ThanatosScavanger by Mavros-Thanatos
Quad Demon by Mavros-Thanatos
creatureBlackLagoon by Mavros-Thanatos
Werewolf by Mavros-Thanatos
Demoness by Mavros-Thanatos

Summoned by Mavros-Thanatos     Tentacle Alien by Mavros-Thanatos


Ground Caged by Mavros-ThanatosBeard Weird by Mavros-Thanatos

Atrocity Strapped by Mavros-Thanatos      Oracle by Mavros-Thanatos

Weeper by Mavros-Thanatos
tubeHead by Mavros-Thanatos
demonic halo by Mavros-Thanatos
Choke by Mavros-Thanatos
Cyclops by Mavros-Thanatos

Tall Troll by Mavros-Thanatos       Reptalien by Mavros-Thanatos

demonRun by Mavros-ThanatosPlated Demon by Mavros-Thanatos

Wheelchair Patient by Mavros-Thanatos      Atrocity 3 by Mavros-Thanatos

Thalidomide by Mavros-Thanatos
deathsHeadDemon by Mavros-Thanatos
Gemini by Mavros-Thanatos
Atrocity2 by Mavros-Thanatos
Bladez Poses by Mavros-Thanatos
floorTorment by Mavros-Thanatos

Finned Alien Creature by Mavros-Thanatos      Guard by Mavros-Thanatos

vampireCorpse by Mavros-Thanatos

Torment by Mavros-Thanatos     Patient2 by Mavros-Thanatos

Double3 by Mavros-Thanatos
Atrocity by Mavros-Thanatos
Spiked Demon by Mavros-Thanatos

Demon Sculpt Composite by Mavros-Thanatos      Bladez by Mavros-Thanatos

Bug Eyes by Mavros-Thanatos



Anastasios Gionis is a digital sculptor and 3D modeler for the film industry. His work has been featured in films such as Snow White and the Huntsman,Cabin in the WoodsLand of the LostHop, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,The Sorcerer's Apprentice, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon EmperorHe also did character design for kids TV shows including As Told by GingerAll Grown UpSquirrel Boy, and Rocket Power.
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:groups: :iconskyandnatureclub: :groups:




Hello dear members and non-members :wave: How are you ?


As you know, the SkyAndNatureClub features the Under-appreciated: submissions under 100 :+fav:s.
"Under-appreciated Submissions" News Articles are submitted twice a month! :woohoo:

:bulletred: We are hoping that the submissions below would get more comments and faves.
 They deserve more than that :nod: Please take the time to Comment OR/AND Fave these submissions, as it will mean a lot to them and to us :aww:

:bulletred: For your information, those submissions are chosen from the gallery folder
    October 16th - 30th 2011 :rose:

:bulletred: To join this group, please read this blog!




:star: Enjoy! :star:






Flowers, Plants & Macro:






Halloween Plant by verolive Private Sun by Egil21 Waldbewohner 4 by Martina-WW
S by venegra rosa by turulato :thumb165980398:
Flower hearts by aeolawind  Pink rose by PixxelleDevilicious  autumn IV by thestargazer23
Cherry Blossom 3 by simzcom  rose2 by Fede2090




Landscapes:






Lake by uae4u Reaching by dkwynia ...Interactive Panorama Hammerstad... by FelixInden
Ambient by theviita:thumb263586830:
Patchwork Vista by CrowManIC Blanket Of Color Print Quality by AngelaLeonetti Pastel sunset by Just-a-Witness
Grand Teton by makobsan Rural art India by Shashikanta




Waterscapes:






Fall by butterphoto Fall day by Reborn5
cascades by neronin Carezza lake by eve80 Lago by mARTinimal
Iclandic Nature v.2 by duvessa2 Stream 2 by craiggriggs  Swirling Beyond Belief by Hysazu
Dawn at Eagle Creek. by Allen59 Roots by gryphiz




Sky shots:






Dark Spectrum by Aztil The sun's speechless by jazzypao
 :thumb263047003: Autumn Sycamore by Grunvald limitless by sugarcoat
 Winter by gregor-hie Sunset 2 by rachwillows Color with passion moment by Littleboyathome  
Northern Lights Zenith Corona by SindreAHN  Flight For The Moon by MaximeDaviron Aurora Borealis by Killswitch88




Animals:






A0734 - Totem. by Lothringen Lupin by annatonks   Brownies by Rozowynos
 sleepy by blue5K :thumb263608633:  Triangle of Turtles by EWilloughby
Seagulls by mysterious-one  Lion by Karl-B  morning brunch by cristusdeath
Pao by NinoLolishvili Curiosity by FantasticFennec  You talkin to me? by mydigitalmind
triton by biba59
 



Insects, Arachnids & Invertebrates:






Flavour by truthdenied
yikes by inner-light Spotted by ida-in-thunderland Bee in flower by Kristinaphoto
Lunch on a Branch by ShamliRotem Preparing for Take off. by BelleEsprit
:thumb265062862: Quiet resting by morpheus880223  Suspendu by glimmering-butterfly
Life in wonderland by EyeDoorCinema Butterfly by Sonia-Rebelo Papillon by RaBBiTKa
 







"Photography helps people to see.  "
    Berenice Abbott (July 17, 1898 – December 9, 1991), American photographer








Practice makes perfection! :w00t: Keep working!

:clap: We are very proud to feature your best!




Contributor,
Egil21 on behalf of SkyAndNatureClub 
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