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Here we have my second attempt at photographing star trails. This was a 16 minute exposure taken at a friend's camp at Sand Bay, roughly 45 km northwest of Sault Ste. Marie, ON.

There are a few 'hazy' patches in this image due to condensation forming on the lens as a result of the cool, humid conditions that night. There were also people hanging out on the dock and swimming during the exposure, and some of that activity is evident in the image.

The original image was quite noisy due to the long exposure, and so I had to perform quite a bit of noise removal on it. Unfortunately, this caused much of the detail of the fainter stars to be lost.

Location of photograph: [link]
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I didn't even know there was supposed to be a meteor shower that night, i got lucky. Same time and location as the last star shot, and again i don't know the details. The white glow to the right is the milky way, the orange at the bottom is light from town. The star in the middle is the north star of course ;)

Anyone who is interested in knowing the basics of how to set up a shot like this just send me a message!
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Picture was taken with my Asahi Pentax K1000, SMC PENTAX-M 50mm lens. Exposed about 45 minutes at f4 on Kodak Max 400 film. I like this, it's very violent and cosmic at the same time. The opposition of cold and warm colours. The green on the low horizon is amazing. Long exposures really lower colour temperature. Pictures taken at night sometimes have these sort of interesting effects to offer.
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The stars of night twist around the immovable Tetons mountains as the last remnants of light on the horizon fade into darkness.

Its amazing how many diffrent colors and lights show up when you do a long exposure, hints of subtle colors invisible to our eyes suddenly become visible.

2005 second exposure (33 minutes) ISO 200 at F4 on a 16-35 2.8 L lens. The freezing temperature help the sensor capture the scene with much less image noise than normally expected. none the less this is still a concept in progress and im excited for future generations of cameras that will capture this scene with less and less image noise.

The hardest part about photographing a scene like this on a moonless night is your blind, you have to level the camera by your bubble level and make a guess as to the field of view the lens is bringing in and your composition. Infinite focus is determined hours earlier while there is still enough light to use live view. Zooming the lens runs the risk of out of focus shots because zoom lens are not parfocal and change there infinite focus point throughout there zoom range.
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The Sky in the Southern Hemisphere, especially at a place like where I've been, far away from bright lights, is amazing by night.
Of course, I took many photos, and I think this one is the best.
Took me a lot of tries, experimenting.

ISO: 100
f/3.5
1h 26 min Exposure Time

hope you like it
cheers

EDIT:
As some people asked how I did this, here the explanation of this technique... (I'm not an expert in it ;) ).
What you need is a tripod, a remote control with snap in/lock function (don't know the correct word, it means, that you activate it and it keeps locked).
what would be good is a cold winter night, no humidity. go as far away from any light sources as possible (for this picture, I was 50km away from the neares city and you still see the light pollution).

If you work with a foreground, i suggest you to go to the scene during daylight to focus... can be difficult when its dark.
With canon cameras (don't know whether nikon/sony/... have this), turn on noise suspression for long exposures in the individual settings menu. you should also work on ISO 100, because it will even then be very noisy...
Chose "m" for manual settings.
as you work with ISO 100, and when its really dark, you should work with f/8 ish (max. ) to f/3.5 or how big you can get it... then, turn your exposure time as long until "bulb" appears (one step after 30" with most canon cameras).
attach the remote control, check one last time, and click'n'lock.
leave it for about 1-2 hours :).
keep in mind that you should charge your battery first.

after this time, you can get your camera back, make sure you don't turn it off when it's in 'busy' mode...

after another hour or so, the picture is finished.
it will be noisy and quite red'ish.

take it to photoshop, kick out the noise and correct some colors.
or dont... whatever...

i'm not an expert when it comes to stars, so i cant tell you where you have to aim when you want to catch the center of rotation, like here... just try out a couple of times.

hope i could help some of you.
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After a big night with friends, we ended on this tropical sandy beach just in time to catch the first light of the day...
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Freezing cold, gale force winds and pitch black darkness were all a significant challenge to achieve this photo. This is the Church of the Good Shepherd, at Lake Tekapo in New Zealand. The sky here at night is one of the most stunning and star-filled I have ever seen. If only the conditions were better I would have taken many more star photos, but the wind made it near impossible to keep the camera still for the long exposures, and the cold was turning my fingers to ice.

Taken with the fish eye lens, this photo is looking south, and among the stars one can see the Southern Cross and Milky Way at the bottom, the large and small Magellanic Clouds in the centre, and Orion to the left. The exposure time is approximately two minutes, held open manually with my finger on the shutter release. Stars far from the south celestial pole (eg Orion) show short star trailing.

The only illumination in the photo is from the street and hotel lights to the right, across the river, about a kilometer away.
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:magnify::magnify::magnify: FULL VIEW IS A MUST :magnify::magnify::magnify:

this is the cutdown version of [link] .

Exposure time was 20sek at 800 ISO. The picture is composed from 7 separate images that were stitched together.

Go to full view, hit F11 in your browser and dive into the night.

Edit:
Here [link] you find an interactive 360° panorama of that scene.
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Another star trail photo from that night out at my camp at Goulais Point, located roughly 50 km northwest of Sault Ste. Marie, ON. This one is a 37 minute exposure. The longer exposure resulted in a great deal of noise/hot pixels that had to be filtered out, but I did my best to clean it up.

Location of photograph: [link]
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This was the view from the shoreline as the moon was setting behind the trees during a night at a friend's camp near Canoe Point on St. Joseph Island.

Location of photograph: [link]
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