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A Barred Owl at the Oregon Zoo perches in the bough of a tree in his enclosure. Normally, this exhibit is in near total darkness and since you aren't allowed to use flash (a rule I respect, but too many other's don't) he is very hard to photograph. This day however, they must have been simulating daylight for him as the lights were on bright enough to get this great portrait shot of both his face and the distinctive patterns of his back from which he gets his name.

Featured here:[link] Featured here:[link]


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I'm talkin' up a storm!


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IMPORTANT! © COPYRIGHT Lone Wolf Photography
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My work may not be reproduced, copied, edited, published, transmitted or uploaded
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I visit the Zoo Herberstein, Austria a few days ago. They have two european lynx babies, born at the 28th of May 2008. awwww :D
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Attributes of Danaus plexippus from www. butterfliesandmoths. org


Family: Brush-footed Butterflies (Nymphalidae)

Subfamily: Milkweed Butterflies (Danainae)

Identification: Upperside of male is bright orange with wide black borders and black veins; hindwing has a patch of scent scales. Upperside of female is orange-brown with wide black borders and blurred black veins. Both sexes have white spots on borders and apex. The Viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus) is a Mullerian mimic; it has similar coloration and is also distasteful.

Life history: Adults warm up by basking dorsally (with their wings open and toward the sun). Females lay eggs singly under the host leaves; caterpillars eat leaves and flowers. Adults make massive migrations from August-October, flying thousands of miles south to hibernate along the California coast and in central Mexico. A few overwinter along the Gulf coast or south Atlantic coast. Along the way, Monarchs stop to feed on flower nectar and to roost together at night. At the Mexico wintering sites, butterflies roost in trees and form huge aggregations that may have millions of individuals. During the winter the butterflies may take moisture and flower nectar during warm days. Most have mated before they leave for the north in the spring, and females lay eggs along the way. Residents of tropical areas do not migrate but appear to make altitude changes during the dry season.

Flight: In North America during spring and summer there may be 1-3 broods in the north and 4-6 broods in the south. May breed all year in Florida, South Texas, and southeastern California.

Wing span: 3 3/8 - 4 7/8 inches (8.6 - 12.4 cm).

Caterpillar hosts: Milkweeds including common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), swamp milkweed (A. incarnata), and showy milkweed (A. speciosa); and milkweed vine in the tropics. Most milkweeds contain cardiac glycosides which are stored in the bodies of both the caterpillar and adult. These poisons are distasteful and emetic to birds and other vertebrate predators. After tasting a Monarch, a predator might associate the bright warning colors of the adult or caterpillar with an unpleasant meal, and avoid Monarchs in the future.

Adult food: Nectar from all milkweeds. Early in the season before milkweeds bloom, Monarchs visit a variety of flowers including dogbane, lilac, red clover, lantana, and thistles. In the fall adults visit composites including goldenrods, blazing stars, ironweed, and tickseed sunflower.

Habitat: Many open habitats including fields, meadows, weedy areas, marshes, and roadsides.

Range: Southern Canada south through all of the United States, Central America, and most of South America. Also present in Australia, Hawaii, and other Pacific Islands.

Conservation: Overwintering sites in California and Mexico should be protected and conserved.

NatureServe Global Status: G5 - Demonstrably secure globally, though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery.

Management needs: Develop conservation and management plans for all wintering sites, migration corridors, and principal breeding areas
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Hirondelle Bicolore (Tachycineta bicolor)

Tree Swallow.
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Couleuvre rayée (Thamnophis sirtalis)

Common garder snake
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not the most interesting bird in the world to look at, but thankfully it gave me the opportunity to shoot it relatively close so im quite chuffed about that
+view

featured here under 12 March: [link]
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Eye to Eye with an Amur Tiger, you can feel the intensity of her stare and can only shiver at the thoughts you know must be going through her mind....

Featured here:[link]



____________________________________

If a picture's worth a thousand words...
I'm talkin' up a storm!


ALL OF MY IMAGES ARE FOR SALE
Even though you don't see the "buy print" button below my pics!
Read important information regarding ordering my prints on my profile page!!

All my images are now open for use as stock!
Please read my Rules of Usage before using.


IMPORTANT! © COPYRIGHT Lone Wolf Photography
This image is copyrighted ©2007 Lone Wolf Photography.
All rights reserved.
My work may not be reproduced, copied, edited, published, transmitted or uploaded
in any way without my written permission. My work does not belong to the public domain.
If you doubt this, feel free to email me: mrdakin_tmp@yahoo.com

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Midnight

I took this at the adoption center where I volunteer. Midnight was a very sweet dog from a local shelter looking for a home.

Midnight's owners got her when she was just a small puppy. They raised her and took care of her for years. Then they decided that they were too busy and felt like they weren't spending enough time with her. So they dumped her at the county shelter.

We hosted her at the pet adoption center for a day to get her (and shelter dogs in general) some attention, try to find her a home, and give her a fun day away from the shelter. At the end of the day when we took her back to the shelter, the adoption center put a memo on her saying we'd be interested in fostering her if they have to put her down. We usually do that for all of the shelter dogs we take in for the day at the adoption center. However, if they call us it's because they are putting the dog down that day and someone has to be there to pick up the dog right then and there. And since everyone at the adoption center has homes full of animals, it's not always possible to take in another pet at the time.

Well, about a week or so after we had Midnight at the adoption center, the adoption center got a call saying that they were putting her down that day.

Luckily there had been another volunteer working with me the day we had Midnight in. (Usually I'm the only one.) And luckily, that volunteer had grown quite fond of Midnight. And even more luckily, that volunteer had room in his home and was able to take in a foster dog.

So he went down to the shelter and picked up Midnight and took her to his house. He quickly bonded with her and she was a great fit in his home, so he decided to adopt her.

Midnight's original owners have no idea that the dog they raised since puppyhood came so close to being killed... just because they felt they weren't spending as much time with her as they used to!


There are plenty of really great animals out there that need homes! Search for adoptable pets in your area on Petfinder.com or visit your local animal shelter

Midnight's story has a happy ending, but there are millions of pets out there in shelters that aren't so lucky. Every day perfectly fine, adoptable animals are euthanized just because they can't find homes. So if you're thinking about getting a pet, whether it be a dog or a cat or a bunny or a hamster or whatever, please consider adopting from a shelter or rescue!

And please spay or neuter the pets you do have, because unwanted litters will just make the current problem even worse. For every puppy that is born each day means that one more shelter dog will have to die.



100% of the profits from sales of this print will go to benefit animal rescue.
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Cool Facts from .www. birds. cornell. edu

The House Finch was originally a bird of the southwestern United States and Mexico. In 1940 a small number of finches were turned loose on Long Island, New York, and they quickly started breeding. They spread across the entire eastern United States and southern Canada within the next 50 years.

The red or yellow color of a male House Finch comes from pigments that it gets in its food during molt. The more pigment in the food, the redder the male. Females prefer to mate with the reddest male they can find, perhaps assuring that they get a capable male who can find enough food to feed the nestlings.

When nestling House Finches defecate, the feces are contained in a membranous sac, as in most birds. The parents eat the fecal sacs of the nestlings for about the first five days. In most songbird species, when the parents stop eating the sacs, they carry the sacs away and dispose of them. But House Finch parents do not remove them, and the sacs accumulate around the rim of the nest.
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Beautiful portrait of Ceann, one of the Oregon Zoo's female Gray Wolves, against a backdrop of Autumn foliage.

She passed away last year and is sorely missed. She had such a great gentle personality and was the color of angels. Now, I'm sure, she's running with them! :nod:


Used in other deviants work here:[link]

Featured here:[link]


____________________________________

If a picture's worth a thousand words...
I'm talkin' up a storm!


ALL OF MY IMAGES ARE FOR SALE
Even though you don't see the "buy print" button below my pics!
Read important information regarding ordering my prints on my profile page!!

All my images are now open for use as stock!
Please read my Rules of Usage before using.


IMPORTANT! © COPYRIGHT Lone Wolf Photography
This image is copyrighted ©2006 Lone Wolf Photography.
All rights reserved.
My work may not be reproduced, copied, edited, published, transmitted or uploaded
in any way without my written permission. My work does not belong to the public domain.
If you doubt this, feel free to email me: mrdakin_tmp@yahoo.com

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