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Similar Deviations
A Barred Owl at the Oregon Zoo perches in the bough of a tree in his enclosure. Normally, this exhibit is in near total darkness and since you aren't allowed to use flash (a rule I respect, but too many other's don't) he is very hard to photograph. This day however, they must have been simulating daylight for him as the lights were on bright enough to get this great portrait shot of both his face and the distinctive patterns of his back from which he gets his name.

Featured here:[link] Featured here:[link]


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I visit the Zoo Herberstein, Austria a few days ago. They have two european lynx babies, born at the 28th of May 2008. awwww :D
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Cool Facts from www. allaboutbirds. org

The White-breasted Nuthatch is normally territorial throughout the year, with pairs staying together. The male has to spend more time looking out for predators when he’s alone than while he’s with his mate. That’s the pattern for most birds, and one reason why birds spend so much time in flocks. But the female nuthatch has to put up with the male pushing her aside from foraging sites, so she spends more time looking around (for him) when he’s around than when she is alone.

In winter, White-breasted Nuthatches join foraging flocks led by chickadees or titmice, perhaps partly because it makes food easier to find and partly because more birds can keep an eye out for predators. One study found that when titmice were removed from a flock, nuthatches were more wary and less willing to visit exposed bird feeders.

If you see a White-breasted Nuthatch making lots of quick trips to and from your feeder – too many for it to be eating them all – it may be storing the seeds for later in the winter, by wedging them into furrows in the bark of nearby trees.

The oldest known White-breasted Nuthatch was 9 years 10 months old.
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Cool Facts from www. birds. cornell. edu

The Red-bellied Woodpecker competes vigorously for nest holes with other woodpeckers, in one case even dragging a Red-cockaded Woodpecker from a nest cavity and killing it. But it is often evicted from nest holes by the European Starling. In some areas, half of all Red-bellied Woodpecker nesting cavities are taken over by starlings.

Stores food in cracks and crevices of trees and fence posts.
The woodpecker does not appear to defend its caches from other birds or mammals.

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker has a longer bill and a longer, wider tongue tip than the female. These adaptations may allow the male to reach deeper into furrows to extract prey and may allow the sexes to divide up the resources in one area.
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not the most interesting bird in the world to look at, but thankfully it gave me the opportunity to shoot it relatively close so im quite chuffed about that
+view

featured here under 12 March: [link]
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Elk in the snow
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Couleuvre rayée (Thamnophis sirtalis)

Common garder snake
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Midnight

I took this at the adoption center where I volunteer. Midnight was a very sweet dog from a local shelter looking for a home.

Midnight's owners got her when she was just a small puppy. They raised her and took care of her for years. Then they decided that they were too busy and felt like they weren't spending enough time with her. So they dumped her at the county shelter.

We hosted her at the pet adoption center for a day to get her (and shelter dogs in general) some attention, try to find her a home, and give her a fun day away from the shelter. At the end of the day when we took her back to the shelter, the adoption center put a memo on her saying we'd be interested in fostering her if they have to put her down. We usually do that for all of the shelter dogs we take in for the day at the adoption center. However, if they call us it's because they are putting the dog down that day and someone has to be there to pick up the dog right then and there. And since everyone at the adoption center has homes full of animals, it's not always possible to take in another pet at the time.

Well, about a week or so after we had Midnight at the adoption center, the adoption center got a call saying that they were putting her down that day.

Luckily there had been another volunteer working with me the day we had Midnight in. (Usually I'm the only one.) And luckily, that volunteer had grown quite fond of Midnight. And even more luckily, that volunteer had room in his home and was able to take in a foster dog.

So he went down to the shelter and picked up Midnight and took her to his house. He quickly bonded with her and she was a great fit in his home, so he decided to adopt her.

Midnight's original owners have no idea that the dog they raised since puppyhood came so close to being killed... just because they felt they weren't spending as much time with her as they used to!


There are plenty of really great animals out there that need homes! Search for adoptable pets in your area on Petfinder.com or visit your local animal shelter

Midnight's story has a happy ending, but there are millions of pets out there in shelters that aren't so lucky. Every day perfectly fine, adoptable animals are euthanized just because they can't find homes. So if you're thinking about getting a pet, whether it be a dog or a cat or a bunny or a hamster or whatever, please consider adopting from a shelter or rescue!

And please spay or neuter the pets you do have, because unwanted litters will just make the current problem even worse. For every puppy that is born each day means that one more shelter dog will have to die.



100% of the profits from sales of this print will go to benefit animal rescue.
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Went to the Minnesota Zoo today! Will slowly upload photos over the next few weeks. Probably.

There were two tigers right in front of the glass, just lounging around, looking quite content.
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Hirondelle Bicolore (Tachycineta bicolor)

Tree Swallow.
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