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Spotlight #061

Sat Mar 22, 2014, 3:08 PM
The Artist Spotlight, volume 61 - a detailed visual journey through the galleries of a selected artist, chosen from the ranks of many talented peers for their particular attention to aesthetic and conceptual composition.


LunaLemon




Poets of the fall. by LunaLemon
Moments. by LunaLemon
I wish I was like you. by LunaLemon
Never meant to say anything. by LunaLemon
World breathing from within. by LunaLemon
It's a small world. by LunaLemon
Atrophy by LunaLemon
You are the reason by LunaLemon
I can feel you when you breathe by LunaLemon
Heartbeats by LunaLemon
Selected Works


:iconlunalemon:
Featured Artist


Spotlight #060

Sat Mar 15, 2014, 5:47 AM
The Artist Spotlight, volume 60 - a detailed visual journey through the galleries of a selected artist, chosen from the ranks of many talented peers for their particular attention to aesthetic and conceptual composition.


alisinwonder




ferry to the past ( on repeat ) by alisinwonder
Home of the Brave II by alisinwonder
Protecting the Stones by alisinwonder
Jailhouse Rock by alisinwonder
mold_metal by alisinwonder
whispering motion by alisinwonder
the sea, the rain, the dream by alisinwonder
gold. by alisinwonder
Airborne by alisinwonder
Up That Hill by alisinwonder
Selected Works


:iconalisinwonder:
Featured Artist


Spotlight #059

Sat Mar 8, 2014, 3:52 PM
The Artist Spotlight, volume 59 - a detailed visual journey through the galleries of a selected artist, chosen from the ranks of many talented peers for their particular attention to aesthetic and conceptual composition.


windrides




sunset by windrides
trails by windrides
_________ by windrides
____ by windrides
_ by windrides
__ by windrides
_ by windrides
__ by windrides
_ by windrides
___ by windrides
Selected Works


:iconwindrides:
Featured Artist


Spotlight #058

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 3:18 AM
The Artist Spotlight, volume 58 - a detailed visual journey through the galleries of a selected artist, chosen from the ranks of many talented peers for their particular attention to aesthetic and conceptual composition.


lien




Catharsis by lien
ThreeMistakes by lien
Book II Empty Walls by lien
FloatingPoint by lien
SpringOffering by lien
RipCord by lien
Babel by lien
Defence by lien
Beacon by lien
DarkMoon by lien
Selected Works


:iconlien:
Featured Artist


Spotlight #057

Sat Jan 25, 2014, 8:58 AM
The Artist Spotlight, volume 57 - a detailed visual journey through the galleries of a selected artist, chosen from the ranks of many talented peers for their particular attention to aesthetic and conceptual composition.


sycamores-and-cedars




Shadow Tree by sycamores-and-cedars
A Stand Of Birches by sycamores-and-cedars
The Creek Beneath The Trees by sycamores-and-cedars
The Yellow Branch by sycamores-and-cedars
January Sunset by sycamores-and-cedars
A Moment At A Time by sycamores-and-cedars
The Elements by sycamores-and-cedars
Back Alley by sycamores-and-cedars
Scratched by sycamores-and-cedars
City Of Glass by sycamores-and-cedars
Selected Works


:iconsycamores-and-cedars:
Featured Artist


Spotlight #056

Sat Jan 18, 2014, 6:41 AM
The Artist Spotlight, volume 56 - a detailed visual journey through the galleries of a selected artist, chosen from the ranks of many talented peers for their particular attention to aesthetic and conceptual composition.


readyo




Traveller no.3 by readyo
Sensorium 2 by readyo
Alterations 1 by readyo
Cloud Passages by readyo
East of Paradise by readyo
Over Stormy Point no.13 by readyo
Pratt's Point no.1 by readyo
And the World became the World by readyo
Over Stormy Point no.14 by readyo
Plant Effects 1 by readyo
Selected Works


:iconreadyo:
Featured Artist


Spotlight #055

Sat Jan 11, 2014, 2:56 PM
The Artist Spotlight, volume 55 - a detailed visual journey through the galleries of a selected artist, chosen from the ranks of many talented peers for their particular attention to aesthetic and conceptual composition.


sjfbetty




daily_1941 by sjfbetty
reflection_0809 by sjfbetty
april_1941 by sjfbetty
miles_0411 by sjfbetty
sunday_5508 by sjfbetty
fog_722 by sjfbetty
winter_5847 by sjfbetty
wish_217 by sjfbetty
sometimes_0311 by sjfbetty
sleep_2108 by sjfbetty
Selected Works


:iconsjfbetty:
Featured Artist


Saturday Spotlight: Volume 053

Sat Nov 30, 2013, 1:46 PM
An Interview with-




> Please introduce yourself, in your own words. What are your interests?
Hi, and thank-you for the invitation! I set up my presence on deviantART under a screen-name that is German, and it means BlueBerryCake in English. It's pronounced more-or-ess like "blauw-bear-koo-khen", and was maybe not exactly the smartest idea, but now I am BBK here and that's fine.

I was born and raised in Germany, studied sociology and languages, and I've been working as a freelance translator (from English into German) for literature for quite a few years now; I love my job. Before this, I had a couple of years as a graphic designer – a job I had thought of as a makeshift solution but came to like a lot – which got me in touch with picture processing and other creative tasks.


> Where did you begin with artistic endeavours? How did you come across Abstraction or Surrealism?
From my childhood years I remember that my father, a dedicated engineer with an artistic mind, used to praise my drawings, but I guess that's what fathers do - at least what they should do! As a teenager I tried different drawing courses but never really warmed up to them. Then I got my father's old camera and loved it. Unfortunately, making photos was fairly expensive back then.

Later I felt more and more drawn to nature photography with the occasional urban capture in between, maybe as a counterbalance to all the words that surround me in my job. I think I gradually included abstraction in my photography when I moved to Montreal not that long ago, when nature became less available to me and my initial excitement for this city faded away a little. I had to start looking closer; beyond the surface, lingering a little longer, doubting first impressions, to get in better touch with my new surroundings. As a result, I am finding even nature again, albeit mostly in its very urban form of existence.


> How would you explain the concept of Abstraction or Surrealism to someone with no experience with the genre?
When you are more taken away by the lines, shapes, colours, patterns or textures of an object or a scene than by the actual thing, by a streak of light, a movement, a mood, an atmosphere... then chances are that you found an approach to the concept of abstraction.


> What inspires you to use Abstraction or Surrealism in your work?
Every-day observations inspire me - things I see, or feelings and thoughts, all combined with the freedom to do more than documenting mere visual facts, something that can become repetitive and demotivating, especially in an urban setting. I think it is the attraction of and the search for the unseen but remarkable, the memorable patterns beneath visual routine.


> What do you want to express with your artwork? What is the idea you're trying to put across?
My wish is to illustrate what I "see", what strikes me in a certain situation, the impression and sentiment of a moment. I want to isolate, underline, and frame seemingly insignificant details that caught my attention. Sometimes this involves adding something that was not in the original picture, maybe a texture or an intensity of light or colour, and sometimes I decide to remove distracting elements, but basically I stick to the "truth", my truth.


> What are your 'tools of the trade'? How do you create your art?
Even though it is possible to work with less, I enjoy using a Canon EOS 600D, a Canon EOS 6D (quite new and I still can't believe my luck!), a few lenses (zoom and prime), a Lensbaby Composer, and a cell phone. Except for the latter, I rely on shooting in RAW format, and for the final tweaks I use Aperture and/or Photoshop – the darkroom equipment of our convenient digital times. For phoneography I like what Snapseed has to offer.


> Do you think the quality of a piece depends more upon technical perfection, or the message contained therein?
Technical perfection is never a bad thing, unless you become so focused on it that it blocks your creative process. Strong images can tolerate some technical imperfection, but technical perfection does not automatically lead to strong images.


> Who are your favourite visual artists, and why?
Firstly, William Turner, for his brilliant abstract approach to landscape painting. his work is a never-ending source of inspiration! Secondly, Alfred Sisley. There is an almost tangible light and atmosphere in his landscapes. Thirdly, Andy Goldsworthy, because of his unique ability to anticipate and realize deceptively natural compositions in all kinds of places.


> Which dA Groups would you recommend to someone looking to get involved with abstract and surreal art?

:iconode-to-simplicity: :iconnadcreations: :iconnature-abstracted: :iconbeautiful-blur:
:iconwanderersoftheearth: :iconphotograph-ism: :iconminimalspace: :iconethereal-square:


> What advice would you give to an absolute beginner in the genre?
Jump in, play, experiment, get carried away, allow yourself to get lost in taking countless photos (if you're using a digital camera, that is!), don't be afraid to see disappointing results on your screen – they are part of the process.


> Any final words on abstract and surreal art?
Hopefully, there won't be final words on it so soon...
For now I'd like to quote my favourite comic strip by Bill Watterson: "There's treasure everywhere."


> In conclusion, pick nine works from your Favourites that you particularly enjoy.



Saturday Spotlight: Volume 052

Sat Nov 23, 2013, 10:35 AM
An Interview with-




> Please introduce yourself, in your own words. What are your interests?
I'm a gallerist, an author, and an artist. I'm living with my man, who is my constant muse; a teenager, who is challenging me not to grow old; a sheepdog, and three ocicats that make things quite lively sometimes. So, I'm living a full life, as they say! Making my photos is my passion at the moment. It's my language – and luckily art is a universal language, so no translators are needed - as is the case when one writes in Finnish. I love to tell stories through my artworks or by my writing. I'm a bit 'off' from the art scene because my art is marginal. That was also the case with my short prose and prose-poetry. However, that gives the freedom to experience and to be different without worrying about others. Aside from this, my deepest interest is with the human condition and what its minds have created in the past and present, and in which direction it will go in the future. I wish I had more hours in my days, and that I would never lose my childish curiosity.


> Where did you begin with artistic endeavours? How did you come across Abstraction or Surrealism?
As a child I was always drawing or writing. I grew up in a family with lots of artists in different fields, so I had difficulties deciding what to choose myself: whether it be music, writing, or visual arts? I compared my skills to my family and relatives and maybe because of that I chose safe academic studies - Comparative Religion, Folklore, Theatre, Literature, Art History and Aesthetics - perhaps to avoid competition with them. It took almost too long to find myself! The studies killed my creativity for years, and I had to live through a long period to get it back. Abstraction has always been inside me, since childhood. I remember having stared off into wallpapers, or clouds, or just plain porridge with milk; seeing faces, people, landscapes, buildings, and creating stories out of what I saw. So, maybe I haven't gotten very far from that point!


> How would you explain the concept of Abstraction or Surrealism to someone with no experience with the genre?
Abstraction is non-representative and in its simplest state it's playing with form, colour, line, and light. A painter may abstractise a landscape, for example, so that there are only these essentials left – and a watcher might see it as a landscape. Somehow a human mind tends to turn abstraction into something representative. Abstraction is like the universe, or life in itself: those big questions, where one tries to find an answer. Abstract work is not a riddle, where one has to find a right answer with one's intelligence; it's to be experienced.


> What inspires you to use Abstraction or Surrealism in your work?
Abstraction connects strongly with emotions and as non-representative work it speaks to every person differently. It gives the pleasure of studying, finding and experiencing. It doesn't speak or tell the story directly, but rather, makes the viewer create their own narrative.


> What do you want to express with your artwork? What is the idea you're trying to put across?
This might sound banal, but I want to express emotions and create stories. Urban decay is full of unseen treasures that most people never see or notice. So, I want to show this unseen world. For some people decay means chaos and ugliness, but for me it's a constant source of beautiful abstract material – in a way, I try to visually accomplish a cosmos out of this chaos.


> What are your 'tools of the trade'? How do you create your art?
My main tools are my camera, my eyes, and associations. Music accompaniment is mainly ambient or classical, to free my subconscious mind and imagination. Usually I make only minor edits to my images, such as contrast and light and saturation, but most of my time goes with "seeing" what the picture wants to tell me. Sometimes it doesn't reveal its secret and I let it wait, until I see and feel it differently - though some pictures stay numb from the very start. Sometimes I work with themes, such as dreams or myths. And as I must have a personal connection to my picture, I'm almost a perfectionist with the titles that I choose, as I want to express the right emotion for each piece. That might also be due to my literary background.


> Do you think the quality of a piece depends more upon technical perfection, or the message contained therein?
I appreciate technical perfection, but if the image does not convey some sort of message, it's just another nice picture. A picture with lousy technical quality may have a strong vision and personal touch, which then makes it much more interesting for me. What I'm looking for in imagery is the idea, and the personal view that I can see. Perfection can be flat; but imperfection can make perfect sense.


> Who are your favourite visual artists, and why?
Anish Kapoor's paintings have made a huge impact on me; I love his expression and strong emotions. Aaron Siskind is an abstract expressionist photographer, who was a master of using flat details and surfaces from surroundings and created new abstract images out of them. Additionally, Avant-garde photography and art from 1920s and 1930s always fascinate me, as well as old Japanese woodcuts, just to mention some examples. I also enjoy many works here on deviantART, and choosing just a few to feature at the end was the hardest point in this interview - almost like violence, as so many great works are left behind...


> Which dA Groups would you recommend to someone looking to get involved with abstract and surreal art?

:iconphotograph-ism: :iconabstract-and-surreal:


> What advice would you give to an absolute beginner in the genre?
I would advise someone to study every-day surroundings, learning to see the potential abstractions within. It's a question of finding a way to see and perceive, especially ones own way of seeing. There is not just one way to make abstracts: just create your own visual language and grammar.


> Any final words on abstract and surreal art?
I love the many facets of abstract art!


> In conclusion, pick nine works from your Favourites that you particularly enjoy.



Saturday Spotlight: Volume 051

Sat Nov 16, 2013, 5:53 AM
An Interview with-




> Please introduce yourself, in your own words. What are your interests?
Hello. My name is Wojtek, I am 34, I live in a Parisian suburb, and I've been working as a software engineer for about 10 years. I would say that I am a "curious about everything" type of guy, always eager to learn and share things. I've got a secret passion for good Belgian beers... but now everybody knows! I also like to play the drums in my free time, although I have to admit photography is taking more and more space in my life.


> Where did you begin with artistic endeavours? How did you come across Abstraction or Surrealism?
I guess art has always been around a little. My older brother is an artist, with a pencil in his hand as far as I can remember. Another close relative is a professional etcher, so we always had many paintings and prints on my parents' walls, and it is still the case at my place. All that must have given me some ideas, but since I have no clue how do draw, I had to find something else!

More recently, I believe that moving to Paris has clearly made my interest towards Art grow. I particularly remember one exhibition which had a great impact: it was an Hokusai art showcase at the Guimet Museum. It's been a revelation to me: it's amazing how simple drawings with a limited colour palette could have such a great evocative impact. All these dream-like and surreal landscapes, those ghosts and dragons, these warriors with their great armours; breathtaking! I really felt that art does not have to be that "complicated" and "elitist" to provide a lot of pleasure. I then started myself a little collection of woodblock prints, silk paintings and Japanese traditional ceramics. I also started to play GO, an amazing game indeed.

I have to admit that I really only came across abstraction and surrealism in photography here, on deviantART, and it has been quite a shock! Of course, I've been well aware of abstract and surreal paintings, but had almost no clue about abstract and surreal photography. Seeing how people play with blurry pictures, textures and simple geometric lines and shapes has been a great eye opener for me. Again, something quite "simple" in form, but that can provide so much impact and pleasure. Exactly what I was looking for as an artist.


> How would you explain the concept of Abstraction or Surrealism to someone with no experience with the genre?
Well, I am still very new to the genre so I'm really no expert, but of course I can share my personal feeling about that. I like to see Abstraction and Surrealism in photography as two opposed approaches.

To me surrealism is about the idea of "extending" the reality. You start with something "real", then "add" things to create a new dimension; a new world, a new layer of meaning. To me it can be as simple as finding a title that gives an unusual perspective to a "common" subject. And of course it can be as complicated as photo-manipulation that creates something that simply could not be captured.

On the other hand, Abstraction is about "subtraction". You start with something "real", then you "remove" some details; through context, through environment, to open up the field of interpretation. A very interesting process since the artist gives "less", and the viewer is compelled to fill what has been removed with their heart and mind to create their own final representation. Abstracting can be as simple as cropping or rotating a picture, and again, it can go all the way to photo-manipulation.

Of course sometimes things are more complicated than that. Some pictures can be abstract and surreal at the same time. I guess everyone should build their own definition of the genre!


> What inspires you to use Abstraction or Surrealism in your work?
The first thing I would think about is clearly the range of possibilities. When I started taking pictures, it was mainly cities, landscapes, and nature, but I felt a good deal of frustration about that. It was quite difficult to express something creative and original with those plain subjects. I've been constantly struggling against the "postcard effect", which is a state of beautiful pictures that don't do much to feed the soul. Discovering abstract and surreal photography has been some kind of a liberation. Now I know there is an infinite world of wonders out there to capture, without the need to go all around the world to get it. It is here, right in front of your nose, you just need a little imagination and soul to see it.

Another aspect that drives me to Abstraction is pure aesthetic enjoyment. I love playing with colours, rhythms, lines and shapes just for the sake of it. And again, not being bound to figurative representation gives incredible freedom. Not having to always care about the message is a great relief. Just like a good piece of music, you don't need to understand the lyrics to fully appreciate, and this is what Abstraction is great about.


> What do you want to express with your artwork? What is the idea you're trying to put across?
When I look at my pictures as a collection, it is a great mess! Obviously I am not building something you would call a "well defined personal universe", or at least not consciously so. But I am quite at peace with that because I am still learning a lot, and experimenting a lot. I would even say that I am glad to be still a little naive about all that. Sometimes I see people doing the "same thing" on and on again, I can't help myself feeling that they are kind of trapped in something, a kind of comfortable routine based on self repetition. I know, it may sound harsh, but at least it is an interesting debate to have.

If I really had to find a recurring outline in my work, I guess it would be the pleasure of finding beauty in the most common subject and revealing it through careful composition and editing. It is like some sort of a game with myself. When I am taking pictures, I am sure that people around are often asking themselves: "but what is he taking a picture of? there's nothing out there!". And I would like to demonstrate that actually there's always something out there, you just need to look hard enough with your heart and soul.


> What are your 'tools of the trade'? How do you create your art?
I guess my tools do not play a great part in the pictures I create. Perhaps I am wrong, but at least I don't want them to. For example, I always discard all exif data from my pictures before submitting them. I don't want people to see what camera/lens/shutter speed/aperture/processing software I used. To me it is some kind of a dream killer. I want people to appreciate pictures as they are, and not spending time making links between what they see and the technical details.

Of course, there is no secret between us! I use a Canon 5D, mainly manual fixed focal lenses (Samyang). I never edit my pictures in Photoshop (too lazy for that I guess). I only perform some editing inside Lightroom; that way I can keep a simple and straightforward RAW workflow: import - organize - edit - export. One thing I would like to mention is the importance for me of editing RAW format pictures. I discovered that only 2 years ago, and actually it changed my life. Sometimes I need to go really deep to dig up things, only RAW gives you the possibility to achieve subtle and clean results.

One last aspect of the way I create pictures is that a lot happens after I press the button. I spend a great time selecting pictures, and usually it is only at that moment that I realise there is something interesting in a particular composition. I usually see the abstract or surreal potential of a picture quite late in the creation process. It is kind-of fun, always a hidden surprise waiting there for me, I just need to concentrate enough to see it.


> Do you think the quality of a piece depends more upon technical perfection, or the message contained therein?
I believe that technical quality is like some kind of spice that makes a picture sublime: if it is missing, well, the picture is good, but not sublime. But that's my thing, I always like to get very close, enjoy every little detail. And in case there is a total lack of technique, it is clearly a deal breaker. I know, I tend to be a perfection seeker!


> Who are your favourite visual artists, and why?
Among traditional art I would first say Rembrandt and his Dutch peers. The quality of light is just amazing in these paintings, and it is something I appreciate a lot. Elsewhere I enjoy the Hokusai and the ukiyo-e style, and the Shin-hanga movement. I also like Monet a lot, along with Hopper, and Soulages.


> Which dA Groups would you recommend to someone looking to get involved with abstract and surreal art?

:iconabstract-and-surreal: :iconthink-abstract: :iconindustrialart:
:iconnon-real: :iconnadcreations: :iconethereal-square:
:iconphotograph-ism: :iconkaleidoscopism: :iconnature-abstracted:
:icondigital-abstract: :iconabstract--reality: :icondilicious-trips:


> What advice would you give to an absolute beginner in the genre?
If you want to learn fast, look at what others do. deviantART is a gold mine for that. And of course any museum of modern art should do the trick. Then, even if the genre is Abstraction or Surrealism, it remains visual art, so any general knowledge should apply: color theory, composition, movement, etc. And of course the most important: experiment, practice, and feel great freedom flowing into you!


> Any final words on abstract and surreal art?
When I was young I thought that nothing could beat a lovely sunset or a ladybug striking a pose on a flower, but I was so wrong, Abstraction wins hands-down... Just kidding around. I love sunsets and flowers, too!


> In conclusion, pick nine works from your Favourites that you particularly enjoy.

Not Here by lindelokse Song And Dance by ifsantag under the weather by VisitingFahrrad
:thumb401075057: Mecanique Celeste by A-Parrot Desperate Times by Einsilbig
The bowl of distortion by lomatic Hipstamatic Series by insolitus85 D-Red by Une-Vache