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Pixel raffle

Journal Entry: Thu Jul 24, 2014, 7:03 AM
Time for the monthly pixel raffle :iconlazydanceplz:

Bullet; Pink HOW TO JOINBullet; Pink

Just fave this journal:) (Smile)

there will be 2 winners  and winners
get a pixel avatar of there choice

raffle will end in 2 days
goodluck
 :iconhappyhappyplz:


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  • Watching: tokyo ghoul, free!

Milk for The Ugly

Tue Jul 22, 2014, 8:07 PM















The
Latest
Thing
of Beauty







Imagine that you are a young social worker, dedicated to finding out the hidden and forgotten old souls who haunt the cold, mean streets of the city. You seek to report on their living conditions, possibly recommending they be removed from their roach-infested “homes.”










So it is that you have come to find yourself sitting at the kitchen table of a cadaverous old shut-in you’ve been assigned to visit. The kitchen is spotlessly pristine while the adjoining darkened living room reeks of rotting garbage.






The sun is setting. You rise to leave. You step over a cardboard barrier separating kitchen from living room, seeking the front door. But it is too late. They have risen. The old woman’s many “children” are awake... and they are hungry.







Let us pause here...






...in this preview of the new Madefire Motion Book experience, Milk for The Ugly, to tell you about the two longtime deviant artists who have created this remarkable achievement in storytelling.







In any case, no prose preview could begin to do justice to the Madefire experience of shifting illustrations in a fully soundtracked narrative. Milk for The Ugly truly has to be experienced to be really appreciated.









Anna & Kate




Rarely do artists of the deviantART community exemplify the skill, creativity, spirit and sheer arts career tenacity of Anna & Kate, the deviants we profile here, who have become, singularly and when working as a team, favorites and real role models within our community.







Anna Podedworna (akreon) & Kate Redesiuk (vesner) were born and raised in similar households in Poland by similarly “overachieving” parents who wanted only the best lives for their daughters, both girls being told, “You can choose whatever you want to be in the future, as long as it is a doctor, a lawyer or an architect.” Anna, being torn between natural science and the fine arts, chose a compromise in pursuing architecture. Kate was “persuaded” to choose architecture by her parents, who just happened to work in construction. Anna & Kate met over doodlings of mutant zombie bunnies at the university. Drawn together by their similarly off-kilter tastes in illustration, they eventually became roommates hooked on digital art, working on projects together.






During their time at the university they learned from one another and their roles started to slowly reverse. Ann grew to like the technical part of architecture, and Kate got more and more into art.









Anna works as a freelance artists while finishing her masters degree. As a freelancer she has worked on illustrations, comics and recently gotten into the world of fashion by working for Ewa Minge and creating a few designs series for her new brand Eva Minge Milano. Once she gets her master degree she wants to get back into architecture and continue pursuing her career as an architect.




Kate dropped out from the university just before becoming an engineer, after realizing she was living someone else’s dream. She decided to become a professional artist. At first she worked as a freelance illustrator for advertising companies but has now made her way into the game development industry and works full-time as a concept artist at CD Projekt RED.









Anna & Kate are known by their deviant followers to sometimes to embody and inhabit their peculiar alter egos, “Pugbun,” a bunny-eared pug dog and “Tailcat,” a cat with a second head on the end of her tail.







Battles over unwashed dishes and strewn crayons have led to war between the two characters. Pugbun of Pugbunistan usually upholds the Anna banner, with TailCat of Tailcatica being a spokescat for Kate’s positions.










Off-White




But it is Off-White, the ongoing adventure tale of a wolf clan on a mythic journey that has become a phenomenon for Anna & Kate as their premier collaboration. This project began as an experiment, a 5-page one-shot, but generated such a warm reception from the community that more pages were created and soon the tale snowballed into it’s current six chapters. The success of the story has spun off its own group on deviantART and a product line of Off-White artwork and collectibles. What Anna & Kate have achieved here is truly an ongoing fulfillment of the deviantART community spirit put into action.



















Not satisfied to rest on their laurels, Anna & Kate have now raised the bar of comic storytelling by utilizing the cutting edge comics sound and motion technology of Madefire, in which illustrated panels come alive at the tap of your device’s monitor screen.




This time out, as befits the subtle movements of light and shadow enabled by Madefire, Milk for The Ugly is more twisted to the playfully macabre tastes of creators, presenting what can be enjoyed as if it were a lost episode of The Twilight Zone. But upon deeper reflection, their little story would appear to be commenting upon modern times at several different levels. In this inside-out classic children’s cautionary tale, the terror in the “woods” has been transplanted to the environs of an urban apartment building.  The old crone’s face has been drawn to hint she might be Death him/her/its self, regenerating discarded half-eaten edibles into human-eating little monsters—making for a horrifying “cycle” of environmentally rational endless re-use.




Or possibly the darling little girl’s rejection of the street hag at the tale’s beginning is simply meant to raise the question of who are the true “uglies” of society? It’s the sort of “instant classic” must-have story that will be returned to again and again by readers. Best of all, the creativity and stylistic artistry (especially in their characters’ facial expressions) achieved in Anna & Kate’s book makes Milk for The Ugly is one of the most beautiful Motion Books you’ll ever experience. It will no doubt be regarded as one of the seminal issues of the "new comics."











Interviews with Anna & Kate





1.As master storytellers and world builders with a wonderful and attentive fan base on deviantART; What excites you most about how Milk for The Ugly looks and feels in terms of storytelling for an audience?





Art style in comics is a great tool of conveying mood and atmosphere of the story. We were very excited to try out a different style that isn't really signature for any of us. It's creepy and grungy, but also cartoony and expressive. It's a nice contrasts that hopefully makes the story feel even darker and more eerie.




2.Can you share what you feel are the most important aspects of telling ongoing episodic stories? Specifically as it relates to cultivating a fan base?





Since internet communities became a thing there have been tons of works written about cultivating fanbases. It takes a lot of time and effort but the theory is rather simple and can be narrowed down to a few most important points.





To be successful be sure to update your story regularly, so fans have something to look forward to every one or two weeks. Stubbornness is the key here, especially with webcomics—it's hard to have a fan base with just one or two pages. The more and the better story you deliver, the more people are going to get hooked up.


Be respectful to your readers and interact with them as often as possible. Answer questions, have fun in the comments, share your thoughts, organize small contests or giveaways.


Try keeping a relatively consistent style of art and writing. It doesn't mean that all parts of the story have to have the same mood and/or art style but it's best to pick 1-3 genres and stick to them.


Or just be like us—scrap the theory, do none of the above, and hope for the best.


3.What are the essential elements of building a complex escalating story world? Order of importance of these elements?




Have a top-down approach. When imagining your world, set a few basic rules for it and start from there.


These rules can be anything from "all animals can speak with humans", through "rain raises instead of falling down" to "ghosts are real and everyone knows that."



Build your story around it and keep questioning everything.”



Make sure your story makes sense within your universe. Think what would happen if your rules were the same but the story different. Always come up with more than you want to tell. The world you build is as important as your story, and can greatly enhance it. The rules we set in our stories are usually bits taken from different mythologies from around the world. We don't like to hold to them too tightly though and usually try to twist and turn them in a way that makes the stories fresh and interesting.









4.How does your process work as far as art creation and the actual writing of the story and dialogue?





Story, art, dialogues. We love telling each other stories while drinking tea. We tell each other's ideas and come up with new ones on the fly. Having someone who listens to your stories is very important. There are always plot holes and mistakes that need to be patched up or reworked, so critique is always important. If you don't have a partner to work with in a team, tell stories to your friends, family or people on the internet. After the story is ready, we sit down and come up with art sequences that could illustrate it. Rough thumbnails showing what's most important to show in a given panel are enough to plan everything out.




At this point we still don't have any specific dialogues, but rather a few important words that need to be spoken or emotions that need to be conveyed.



Only after the art for the comic is done, we once again sit down and try to figure out what would each character say in a given situation.”



Would they have the time for a few sentences or would they be too shocked to say anything at all? Would they use complicated words or simple ones? In some cases dialogues aren't even needed and the story tells itself by images alone.









Milk For The Ugly Character Creation In SketchBook Pro



Kate Redesiuk shows us how to create a character for Milk for The Ugly using SketchBook Pro.








5.Do you see Motion Books online as the inevitable next level of our increasingly mobile society?








It depends. Motion Books are a relatively new medium that still needs to be fully explored. On one hand they add a new value to the traditional comics, but on the other they require much more work. They have the potential for interactive storytelling, but could also go completely opposite direction and get closer to animation. It's all up to creators, and the more motion comics we get, the greater the chance for them to grow into something unique and irreplaceable.



6.As visual artists telling a story, what is the most valuable storytelling innovation enabled by the Madefire process?




Subtle movement! A gentle nod of the head, a flinch of the body, a twitch of an eye. In traditional comics it's incredibly hard to illustrate something that ephemeral without big close-ups or repetition. The motion tool makes it very easy and intuitive.











7.Fans are most familiar with your work as a team on your wolf clan adventure epic, Off-White. But does the darkly humored Milk for The Ugly better reflect your comic sensibilities?




We're very happy that we had the chance to work on something so different to our ongoing comic, but we honestly feel quite free in all sorts of different styles and stories. Off-White is a collaboration that is quite different from both our individual works and personal comic tastes. Milk for the Ugly brought together our joined love for dark and twisted stories, but on the other hand required a more work in finding a middle ground in terms of our art styles. Who knows what the next Madefire Motion Book collaboration between us will result in!








8.Will Off-White continue for as long as fans ask for it, or until you decide your own logical end for it?






Off-White is planned from start all way to its definite end. Our fans will know for sure which page is the very last one in the series.









9.How are Pugbun & Tailcat getting along? Or is that stalemate situation best left uncommented on?




















Anna Kate'sArtists You Better Be Watching











Pascal Campion


PascalCampion


“Pascal's works may seem simple at first glance but that seeming simplicity is what makes me love his art so much. Thanks to his minimalistic approach the amazing array of emotions he puts into each painting shines trough even more brilliantly. Every of his paintings tells more story than many movies or books can only dream of.”


akreon









Yoann Lossel


Yoann-Lossel


“All of Yoann's works are heavy in atmosphere. His unique technique of mixing graphite and gold is simply an epitome of class.”


akreon









Stephanie Pui-Mun Law


puimun


“My favorite contemporary watercolorists hands down. Her paintings are rich in detail, colors and texture. I especially love when she approaches mythological themes in her artwork. She has this wonderful gift to make the stories she illustrates seem satisfactorily familiar and at the same time amazingly fresh.”


akreon









Levente


leventep


“I'm always impressed with how Levente Peterffy can archive realism with the simplest of brush strokes. In every one of his painting you can find a very creative texturing, strong composition and moody lighting.”


akreon









Noah Bradley


noahbradley


“Noah Bradley is not only an incredible artist but also an amazing teacher. The advice he shares on his blog helped me grow as an artist and allowed me to become a successful freelancer.”


vesner









Hannah Christenson


Nafah


“Hannah Christenson is by far one of my favorite illustrators. Thanks to the finesse of lines and incredibly tasteful details, her art is always full of life and emotion”


vesner









Serge Birault


PapaNinja


“My daily dose of beautiful women and tentacles. Serge's art never ceases to amaze me with how clean and fresh it looks without losing its realism. I'm in love with his unique stylization and lighthearted approach to all of his works.”


vesner









Michal Ivan


michalivan


“Michal is a master of color and composition. He tames and controls chaos, creating incredibly detailed and yet perfectly clear compositions that flawlessly lead the viewer's eyes.”


vesner











A revolution in digital comics






When future anniversary celebrations mark the release of Madefire Motion Book Tool, much will be made of “under-the-radar” revolution this event precipitated in the creation, production and delivery cycle of content distribution.






With the Madefire Motion Book Tool on deviantART the artist controls the full creative, production and distribution chain, making it possible to self-publish digital comics for free or for pay, in motion or static, with or without effects, episodic or periodic. But it is really any “book” form that has become liberated—the Full Spectrum Narrative comes to life. And fans are empowered as well to directly engage in the the equivalent format with their favorite stories.






A new dawn is breaking in the online digital and mobile comics world—and Madefire is leading the creative caravan into the new day.











Questions For The Reader






  1. Have you had to make hard decisions between pleasing those who care about you in your family and following instead your own path to achievement no matter how difficult your chances might be?
  2. Who would you choose to have your alter ego or avatar befriend choosing between Anna & Kate’s Pugbun & Tailcat?
  3. Do you have an alter ego who can talk on your behalf. If you do, please place a picture in the comments?
  4. Motion Books open up a new medium between storyboards and animation. What would be the perfect fit for this medium?








:iconprojecteducate:
:iconprojecteducate:


Literature Basics Week

Okay, so maybe not everything. But there's a lot of stuff that I remember learning in middle and high school that turned out to not actually work for me -- or for pretty much anybody -- as a writer.  I'm hoping that if I can lay these lies out for you, we cans turn it around and unlearn some of these bad habits. Because, man, nothing says "noob" like practicing some of these frequently-taught faux pas.

Lie #1: Be super duper descriptive!


PLLSpencerSubtlety2

Wait, wait, I know what you're thinking. Descriptive language is good, right? You want your reader to know what you're talking about, and to be able to see, smell it, hear it, touch it, taste it the way you do in your head. The problem is that, when it comes to description, a little bit goes a long way.  Sometimes, it's about finding a better word to use, instead of a string of adverbs and adjectives to go with your verb or noun.  You know, you could say "She skulked through the forest" instead of "She walked sneakily through the heavily-wooded area."  See what I mean?  Now, that's kind of an obvious one, but when you go to write, here's a good trick to keep in mind: modifiers are evil. They are sneaky and they will slip into your poetry and prose without you even noticing. Your job, as a writer, is to keep an eye on those things.

Modifiers -- like adverbs and adjectives -- are words that describe other words. They should be used sparingly. Otherwise, you're going to have a mess on your hands. When you're writing, always ask yourself, do I need this word? Or is there something simpler and equally descriptive that I could use here?

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: Use descriptive language and sensory details, choosing words carefully. Every word you put on the page should be a word that NEEDS to be there.

Lie # 2: Show off your vocabulary!


PLLHannaBigWords

Some writers I've run into have a penchant for tossing around five dollar words. It's almost as if they want the reader to know that they totally nailed the vocab section on their SATs. The thing is, creative writing isn't about what you know, it's about telling a story in the smoothest way possible. So why use "loquacious" if you could say "chatty?" Think about how your narrator or point-of-view character would think and speak. Think of how the people around you speak. If you can't imagine someone using that word in a conversation, it's probably a no-go. When it comes to five-dollar words, they should be sprinkled, not poured, into your writing.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: If you want your writing to feel authentic, use authentic language. Use those five dollar words sparingly!

Lie #3: Spice up your speech tags!


PLLWorsetoWorser

Here's the thing about speech tags: They should be invisible. The reader should pretty much not notice them at all. I mean, there's a reason that you sometimes don't even need them -- like in an extended conversation between two characters.  There are pretty much only two speech tags you will ever need: "said" and "asked." (You can, and should, of course, alter the tense as needed.) You may be able to slip in a "screamed" or a "replied" here and there, but sticking to the basics is always the better option. You don't want your reader getting hung up on speech tags when she should be paying attention to the conversation and the story.

Another word on speech tags: Using simple tags like "said" and "asked" doesn't give you carte blanche to start throwing adverbs around. "She said, angrily" or "he asked, jokingly" is just as much of an offense as not using a simple speech tag. If someone is speaking angrily or jokingly, that should show in the words they're using, and in the body language in the scene.  This is a great case of "show, don't tell," which, thankfully, is a lesson from school that you can hold onto.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: You will hardly ever need to use words other than "said" or "asked."

Lie #4: Poetry is about your feelings!


PLLAriaForkInNeck

No. Poetry is about expressing yourself, sure -- just like any other writing. But it's not about emotions. It's about saying something. It's a narrative between the poet and the reader, and it should be full of images and ideas, not simply the thoughts you would write in your journal with some line breaks thrown in. Yes, poetry -- just like any other writing -- can be emotional. But your job as the writer isn't to emote onto the page. It's to get your reader to emote. Again, this is a place where that whole "show, don't tell" thing comes in handy.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: Poetry isn't about any one thing. And all writing should evoke emotions. Use your excellent writing skills to make the reader feel!

Lie #5: Capitalize the beginning of every line in your poem!


PLLAriaWeAllGetItWrong

This is actually an antiquated form. If you're reading poetry -- and if you're writing poetry, I hope you are! -- you'll notice that contemporary poets only capitalize where they would in a regular sentence. So lines can start with lowercase letters. You capitalize when you start a new sentence, or for proper nouns -- all the usual suspects. But when you start a new line, and the previous line didn't end with a period, no, you don't need to capitalize. In fact, I'd recommend sticking to the new way of doing things. We both know you're not Shakespeare, after all.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: Sure, you can capitalize every line, but it's going to make you look old-fashioned. And not in a trendy way.

Lie #6: Practice writing by writing!


PLLHannaEw

This is actually half true. Yes, you do get better at writing by writing. But you know what's even better? Reading. A well-read writer is going to be a way better writer than a writer who writes every day but never reads.  I promise you, this is a fact.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: If you're not reading as well as writing, you're doing it wrong.

Lie #7: A haiku is 5-7-5!


PLLWhat

Yikes! They really stepped in it with this one. Sure, some haiku these days are 5-7-5, but usually these are referred to as senryu, since they are Westernized and have less to do with nature and brevity and more to do with cramming something into that syllabic format, often with a humorous twist. There's a lot of information out there about haiku, but I'll leave you with this: Writing haiku is more about brevity and observing nature than it is about an exact syllable count.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: Haiku isn't about the syllables. Do some research and figure out what style of haiku works for you!

Lie #8: The classics are the right way to learn writing!


PLLAriaYouDidNotJustSayThat

Sure, the classics are great. But if you want to write for contemporary readers (like, you know, alive people), it's a good idea to read contemporary work! Enjoy some Emily Dickinson, but make sure you're also checking out Louise Gluck. Feel free to curl up with J.D. Salinger, but don't forget about Jennifer Egan. And, you know, there's lots to be discovered in your local library or bookstore -- not just the bestsellers. Read widely across genre and author background. Read books you like and books you don't like. Just make sure you're reading, and reading more than the tried and true golden oldies.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: If you want to improve your craft, read lots of genres and DEFINITELY check out your contemporaries!

Lie #9: Only write what you know!


PLLMonaBoring

If this were true, we wouldn't have, I don't know, any fantasy. Or space operas. Or historical fiction. Sure, it takes a lot of imagination and even more research, but writing outside of your comfort zone can be a good thing. Writing what you know can keep you grounded, and using your life experience to keep your writing honest is an excellent idea. But talking to people with different experiences from you, and reading about other lives and other ideas, and imagining schools for young wizards...well, these are all great tactics for writing richer stories.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: Start with what you know, use your imagination and your ability to do research to take your writing to the next level.

Lie #10: You're a genius!


PLLAliDontScream

Don't pretend someone in your life hasn't told you this. Someone along the line -- a mother, a teacher, a friend -- has probably read your writing and told you that you're going to be a New York Times best-selling author. And it felt good, I bet. But, you know what? If it's someone like a parent, a teacher, or a friend, they might be looking at your writing through rose-colored glasses. And you need someone who's going to be tough on you if you want to improve and have any chance at being a capital A Author. Are you a genius? Maybe. But don't take this "lesson" at face value.

SO HERE'S THE TRUTH: If you don't work hard and seek critical feedback, and learn to take critical (and negative) feedback, you probably won't succeed no mater what kind of talent you have.


PLLEmilySoMuchGoingOn

Got questions?  Leave 'em below!  There are exceptions to every rule, and there are plenty of rules that might not make sense, which is why talking to other writers is always helpful. (Another lie: Writers can only be successful when they are holed up in a cabin in the woods somewhere.)  And feel free to share some of the lies you've heard before! In the mean time, enjoy the rest of PE: Literature Basics Week!

http://www.ekristinanderson.com

 



July Art Raffle [OPEN]

Tue Jul 22, 2014, 11:20 PM

Hello lovely people ♥


My name is Jenn and I've been a deviant for 4 days.
I just wanted to thank everyone for the amazing support you have given me.
Thank you for all the warm welcomes and sweet comments.
I am blown away by your overwhelming responses to my artworks.
Thank you so much to my 200+ watchers :iconasdfghbeeplz:

To thank you guys, I've decided to hold monthly Art Raffles. So here is July's Raffle!
If you're interested in winning art from me, continue reading. <3

How to enter:


+Fav this Journal entry.

Comments are optional but will be very much adored.

This is for Watchers only. You can be a new watcher and still be put into the raffle.

Those who advertise this Raffle in a Journal entry and/or poll with receive an extra entry number. Make sure you mention me so I know you've made one.

I will be using a random number generator to generate the random winner. Each person has a chance of getting a total of 3 different numbers. One from faving this entry, another from making a  journal entry and the last one from making a poll.

This Raffle ends one week from now on July 29, 2014 10:00 pm Hawaii Time to ensure everyone has a chance to enter. I will announce and note the winner.

Good luck lovelies !

What you'll be winning:


A headshot of any character you want



Skin by SimplySilent
I haven't spend much time on my computer last weekend, but enough to see that DeviantArt was kept busy by a troll that apparently did really well for as much as trolls can 'do well' on the internet. A little over 4000 pageviews in just 4 days the account is online proved not only the artists involved in the matter took offense... but apparently a lot of other DeviantArt members as well. Even those that seemed (to me at least) totally uninvolved with the troll or the particular type of art.
For those that wonder about the issue; It's about Foxbun's rather cynical joke about the 'closed species' matter. (I'm usually against name calling here. But this account has intentionally created for its goal. It has been all over the site already and would've been in the comments within 10 minutes, even without me mentioning here. I don't provide a link, though. Use your search engine if you want to research it.)

The term white knight is to most older members of DeviantArt (or the internet in general) a well known term, and not for its positive connotation. It's most used in the context of fanatic fangirls or groupies that defend a celebrity or (in this case) famous artist on basically every front, regardless of checking sources, or if this person is right and reasonable or not. This often leads to awkward situations, harassing people, spamming and entire wars against a single (sometimes unaware) critic, often with devastating consequences. 

Seeing the huge amount hateful of comments on this single issue, and considering the fact that a few of the artists attacked where considered 'big shots' on DeviantArt, I consider this again a classic case of white knighting. And regardless of the person being a scam or not; I do not like the sight of that. Not at all. It reminds me a bit too much of the high school bullying where it was often 10 people against 1, and the rest stood by and just watched and laughed. I just can't help to cringe at that kind of behavior. 

Sure, this person might be an experienced internet user. A troll, or whatever people might call it. But not all people are aware of internet rules and community etiquette.
In one of my early years on DeviantArt, I once made the mistake to post a critical comment on an artwork from a user that had a rather big fanbase. Despite my good intentions of actually of wanting to help this artist, and the fact that my comment was overall balanced, the comment was everything but appreciated. At least; not by her fans. Even before she could reply I got at least 5 replies in my inbox written by her fans. They told me, not in the nicest way, my comment was unjustified and that I was a **** [you may imagine] for even having the guts to write something like that to their idol. In the end the artist herself never replied to me, but the negative feeling that came with her drawings lasted a long time. I unwatched her for a while. And even when I found back the courage to watch her again (when I realized she wasn't the one responsible, but her fans were) I actually never commented again. I liked her art, but wanted to avoid her fans really badly.

A few years of experience and a lot more watchers have basically forced to view the issue from the other side as well. 
And this makes it part of the reason why I want to share this with people.

Because as an artist I've learned that you can't completely control a watcher base. A few days ago I made a piece for the MH17 airplane disaster. Just, heartfelt, because as a fellow Dutchy (a lot of people from my country died there) I felt like it. Most reactions were positive. One, however, was negative. But before I even woke up the next day and had the chance to look at it and write a reply to it... another person already wrote something instead. Luckily this was a very sensible person and a very sensible and thoughtful comment. But the point is; with such exposure, people answer things before I myself can even get to it. And that's basically how part of this happens.
Part of it, I say. Because I firmly believe the other part is controllable with responsible behavior. There's a difference between making a journal about "Somebody insulted me. I feel bad today"  or "Person-X insulted me. What a ****". The first statement is probably going to get you some cyber hugs and comforting reactions. The second thing will most definitely redirect all the hate towards that Person-X. And while that sweet revenge might bring you relief for a second, it won't make you anything more than just a big cyber bully. Overall; refrain from name calling, unless positive... or unless it's such a big blown up matter that everybody already knows it and not saying the word is like ignoring an elephant in the room.

As for people in whose name is white knightned (if that even is a verb). I cannot speak for all of them on DeviantArt here, but I'm sure there are many people with me on this one, that don't particularly like it when their "fans" go all out on someone or something. Having a reasonable discussion with someone about a subject, even in the name of some else, is totally fine. As long as it's done in a polite manner and with some solid arguments. Trolling people, harassing them, spamming them, calling names, bullying them... etc... is not cool.
It might seem cute and everything. Defending your idol. And sure, I can imagine people being protective towards someone else that else that already gets a lot of criticism -- I don't deny the fact that some people here are in fact exposed to harsh criticism. But doing bad things in the name of your idol only gives your idol a bad name and reputation. And that's the one thing you don't want as fanatic fan. People turning away from your fandom, because they might've liked the fandom itself, but can't stand the fans. 

To return to the beginning of my DeviantArt journey. I was a newbie on the site, a non-native English person (took me ages to write a message in English) and unaware of the general culture on the site. I thought I did something helpful, and those reactions scared the shit out of me. That being one of the first experiences with that particular artist on the site, it left such a bad taste in my mouth that I never commented on the artist work again. Ironically not even up until today. I could've been an amazing fan, though. Considering that, back in that time, I was a basement dweller with basically no life and there were other people that I commented on all the time. But yeah, those so called fans just scared me away.

What I wanted to say is; just don't be that person that ruins the experience for other people on the website.
If the artist himself wants to be an ass and chase away his fans... that's up to him. Those are his fans, so it's his loss. But don't do it for another artist. If someone personally attacks you, your family, or your best friend... it's totally be okay to get involved. If someone attacks your art, it's okay to get angry. But don't get into a fight for an artist you barely know. Or at least not without doing a proper background check on the subject and having a solid opinion on the subject that's actually yours.

And as a final note. Before any of you go harassing to comment section saying "OMG! U support art theft!!!!" or anything like that, just because I mentioned this particular case; learn to read context. I don't support art theft at all, and I've never done so. But I don't support cyber bullying either. My stance on this case is rather neutral, and the only reason I brought it up is to serve as a recent example.
HETALIANS! LOOK! SPARKLEY NEW SEASON FIVE!!!!!!!
I did this for you guys :iconcryingfemamericaplz::iconpoutiefemamericaplz:
NO BASHING

:star: No Ep1 because it is not avaible in some countries :(


:star: Gakuen Hetalia : Go Forth! Newspaper Club!! First Half

:star: Go Forth! Newspaper Club!! Second Half

:star: Russia and Friends

:star:  Though I May Depart, You Shall Remain

:star: Romano's Diary

:star: Things That Often Happen When Rooming With An American

:star: The Gentle FIght Between Russia And I

@ Netherland

:star: Turkey & I

:star: April Fools

:star: Merry Halloween

:star: Finding Santa

:star: Brother, We Are...!!

:star:bientôt! Until We Meet Again!

:star: What Italy Forgot

:star: Hetalia of the Dead part 1

Did America just make a Paranormal Activity Ref? :D
:star: Hetalia of the Dead part 2

:star: Keep On Moving!! March Forward, Sealand!

:star: It’s the First Anniversary! The Tripartite Pact



:star: Buon San Valentino part 1

:star: Buon San Valentino part 2


:star: Liechtenstein and the Hedgehog Country



:star:NEW:star: Centennial Gift



:iconhappyfemamericaplz:I was Overwhelmed by Heroines!

(I sound like Fem!America :'3)
'I'm the heroine! Don't do drugs kids!'

:star: BLOOPERS :star:
  • Mood: Zest
  • Listening to: Hetalia
  • Watching: Hetalia

deviantART Customisation FAQ

Wed Jul 23, 2014, 11:26 AM
welp i'm starting the raffle now that i have some free time to judge the contest entry
the price list is:
P1.  monocolor headshots:  Elsa by Ex-Trident for 2 person
P2.  paint headshot: Raffle Prize: Hatsune Miku (Deep Sea Miku) by Ex-Trident for 2 person


How To Enter:

1. fave the journal
2. profit
(just fave and you're in the entry list :3)

and if you don't mind, do share
oryoucanjustfavitwithouttellinganyonesoyoucanwinthemallhuehuejk

Deadline:

28 july 2014

11 PM +7UTC

===================================================================
Winner list:
P1.
P2.
P1.
P2.
====================================================================
usual random.org for picking numbers
good luck peeps ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
  • Mood: Tired
  • Listening to: giji fukashigi
  • Reading: comments

Basic CSS Style Guide

Wed Jul 23, 2014, 11:16 AM

Introduction



CSS is a style language used to define the style and formatting of web pages. It is used in conjunction with HTML.


If we think of HTML as the building blocks of the web then, essentially, CSS is the painter and decorator. Very simply, HTML defines the structure of the page and CSS defines the style.

What I'll be helping you with here is getting to grips with the basics of CSS. I'll be explaining how use CSS as well as providing a number of examples that you can use to style your own web pages and journals. All you need to do is copy/paste the code and replace the sample text with your own content. Along with the quick reference I've also written a brief glossary of terms and provided a list of useful links in case you wish to do some further reading.

A point of note is that while the information and examples I've given here apply to CSS use anywhere on the web, this guide itself is geared towards the use of CSS on deviantART. As such, and given that this has been created as a basic guide and quick reference, you may require further reading to make the most of CSS's capabilities.

As always, if you have any questions or problems just let me know.




How To



CSS is written in the following format.

selector {property:value;}

The selector selects the element to be styled, the property defines the aspect of that element to be styled and the value defines the way the element will be styled. Let's look at a complete example to see how it works.



h1 {color:#4f4f4f;}

In this example we're saying that we want the colour (property) of all h1 (selector) elements to be dark grey (value).

You can specify a number of properties and values for the same element.



h1 {color:#4f4f4f;text-transform:uppercase;}

In the above example we're saying that we want the colour of all h1 elements to be dark grey and written in uppercase letters.

Now, CSS contains the information for styling elements but it can't act on it's own. HTML elements are needed to create content for those styles to then be applied to. Let's look at an example of how this works.



CSS
h1 {color:#4f4f4f;}
HTML
<h1>sample text</h1>


In the CSS we're saying that the h1 header elements should be dark grey. In the HTML we're declaring the sample text as a h1 element. The CSS will read the HTML <h1> tags and colour the text in-between them dark grey.

CSS on deviantART can be used in journal and gallery skins. For journals, the HTML will be written along with your normal journal text in the Sta.sh editor and the CSS will be written in the journal's Edit Skin area. For galleries, the HTML will be written in the description box and the CSS will be written in the Add CSS area.




Selectors



Selectors determine the element to be styled. There are a number of different selector types you can use depending on the desired outcome.

Element Selectors target the content of HTML tags based on the element name. The example below says that all paragraph text should be dark grey.



CSS
p {color:#4f4f4f;}
HTML
<p>sample text</p>


id Selectors target the content of HTML tags based on a specified id. The id should be unique and used for a single element on the page.  Id selectors are signified in CSS by a hash tag preceding the id name. The HTML element should include the text id="..." within the opening tag.

The example below says that paragraph text with the 'intro' id should be dark grey.


CSS
#intro {color:#4f4f4f;}
HTML
<p id="intro">sample text</p>


Class Selectors target the content of HTML tags based on a specified class name. Elements using the same class can be used multiple times on the page. Class selectors are signified in CSS by a full stop preceding the class name. The HTML element should include the text class="..." within the opening tag.

The example below says that any element with the 'info' class should be dark grey. In this case any <a> tag, <p> tag or any other tag including the 'info class' will be styled.


CSS
.info {color:#4f4f4f;}
HTML
<p class="info">sample text</p>


The example below says that any paragraph text with the 'info' class should be dark grey. In this case only <p> tags including the 'info' class will be affected. <a> tags, for example, containing the 'info' class will not be styled.


CSS
p.info {color:#4f4f4f;}
HTML
<p class="info">sample text</p>


You can use your own id and class names. Just remember to make sure that the class or id name you use in the HTML matches what you've written in the CSS.


References



The reference list below gives examples of a number of common properties that you can use to style your pages and journals. Simply replace the green text in each example with your own values. If there are limited acceptable values for a property then the options are given underneath the example. Where a numerical or hex value are required you can enter any valid value.



Text



font-family
specifies the font to be used
font-family: arial;
times new roman, georgia, arial, etc

font-size
specifies the size of the text
font-size: 12px;
insert a value

font-style
styles text as italic or normal
font-style: italic;
normal, italic

font-weight
styles text as bold or normal
font-weight: bold;
normal, bold

color
sets the text colour
color: #000000;
insert a hex value

letter-spacing
inserts space between letters
letter-spacing: 2px;
insert a value

text-align
aligns text
text-align: right;
left, right, center, justify

text-decoration
strikes out or underlines text
text-decoration: none;
none, underline, line-through

text-transform
sets text to uppercase or lowercase letters
text-transform: uppercase;
uppercase, lowercase


Design



background-color
sets the background colour
background-color: #ffffff;
hex value, transparent

background-image
sets a background image
background-image: url(http://website.com/bg.png);
insert your image URL.

background-repeat
repeats background image / used with background-image property
background-repeat: repeat-x;
repeat, repeat-x, repeat-y, no-repeat

border
creates a border around an element
border: 1px solid #4f4f4f;
solid, dotted, dashed

border-radius
creates rounded border corners / used with border property
border-radius: 5px;
insert a value


Layout



margin
creates space around the outside of an element
margin: 10px auto 10px auto;
insert a value for each side (top-right-bottom-left)

padding
creates space inside an element
padding: 10px auto 10px auto;
insert a value for each side (top-right-bottom-left)

float
floats an element left or right
float: left;
left, right

position
specifies the type of positioning used for an element
position: absolute;
absolute, relative

width
sets the width of an element
width: 50px;
insert a value

height
sets the height of an element
height: 50px;
insert a value

display
specifies what type of box to use for an element
display: none;
none, inline, block


Glossary



CSS (Cascading Style Sheet) is a style language used to define the style and formatting of web pages.

HTML (HyperText Markup Language) is a markup language used to create web pages.

Selectors specify the element to be styled. Below we are selecting all h1 header elements to be styled.


h1 {color:#4f4f4f;}


Properties are the different aspects of style that can be defined. Below we are defining the colour of all h1 header elements.


h1 {color:#4f4f4f;}


Values define the way elements are styled. Below were are saying we want all h1 header element to be dark grey.


h1 {color:#4f4f4f;}


Tags are used to define layout and styles. Tag names are enclosed in angle brackets and usually come in pairs consisting of an opening tag and closing tag. The closing tag includes a forward slash before the tag name.
<tag> </tag>


URL (uniform resource locator) refers to the specific location of an item on the internet. It is also refered to as a web address and is used to identify and link to specific pages and content.


http://www.website.com


Hex codes are a string of six digits and letters preceeded by a hash tag used to define a certain colour.


#ffffff


Helpful Links



deviantART Customisation FAQ
A list of the most frequently asked questions regarding customising your deviantART account. Answers include information and instructions.

Basic HTML Formatting Guide
A quick guide to formatting content with HTML.

w3schools
A comprehensive information resource covering all aspects of HTML.

Hex and RGB values
Get hex and rgb numbers for any colour

Google Fonts
A collection of Open Source fonts you can use on your pages for free.


.

Wed Jul 23, 2014, 2:04 AM
my grandfather died last night

and i sat on the roof for three hours
and i felt
and i felt
and i wrote
and i wrote

and then
i bit the night
and the night, it bit me back
and i cried

and today
i am still feeling
and today
i am still writing

and now
i have made
a decision;

i am letting
my mind

off it's leash

(i'm going to let my mind chew right through me)